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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 10-05-10, 01:10 PM   #1
LazurusTaxa
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700c Disk Wheel Suggestions

Ok I'm not sure if any of you saw my previous 'which frame' threads, but I finally settled on a Gunnar Fast Lane. I now need to get a set of 700c disk wheels for it, and I am not sure what is out there in this market. I want them to be pretty sturdy so they will support my 180lbs and panniers. I suppose some cyclocross oriented wheels might work, but i am not familiar with those options. Does anyone have experience with the Mavic Speed City wheels? I dont know how much I like the 24 count spokes, but i do like the cartridge bearings. Would the best option be to just build up some 32 hole Open Pros with XT Hubs?? Thanks for any input!
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Old 10-05-10, 01:31 PM   #2
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Since you're building nice wheels from scratch for a commuter, consider getting the front wheel built with an Alfine dynohub. Dynamo-driven lights are pretty awesome if you're doing a decent chunk of riding at night.

I bought this wheel (or a very close relative) earlier this year and it is serving me very well. The rim actually has retro-reflective paint, which is a nice bonus for a commuter wheel.
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Old 10-05-10, 01:40 PM   #3
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Thats a good point.. I havent really looked into dynamo hubs. I will be doing some night time commuting, especially during these upcoming winter months.. Another question though, I have never gotten wheels custom built. How much extra would I expect to spend on spokes, nipples, and labor, when getting wheels built?
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Old 10-05-10, 01:58 PM   #4
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This will give you a rough ballpark: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/wheel...#wheelbuilding
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Old 10-05-10, 02:06 PM   #5
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Thanks for the info... Kojak, I like your idea, but apparently i cant send PMs untill my post count reaches 50.. Sooo.. i dont know where to go from there.
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Old 10-05-10, 02:36 PM   #6
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If you haven't done this before, leave wheel building to the pros. My first set of wheels was not good at all and I spent more money on it that it would cost to get a set of similar wheels from Bicycle Wheel Warehouse.

Adam
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Old 10-05-10, 02:54 PM   #7
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If you haven't done this before, leave wheel building to the pros. My first set of wheels was not good at all and I spent more money on it that it would cost to get a set of similar wheels from Bicycle Wheel Warehouse.

Adam
It won't save money, but an option that I used was to hire a wheelbuilder to build my wheelset with me - I did most of the tedious work, he stood over my shoulder for the final tensioning and truing. I ended up with a great set of commuter wheels, a good feeling of accomplishment, and some knowledge and skill in the mix. BTW, my commute wheelset has a schmidt dynohub up front, and a Phil Wood cassette hub in the back, both 36 spoke and heavy duty rims (Mavic A719). Not sure why anybody would want to commute on a disc wheel.
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Old 10-05-10, 03:46 PM   #8
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I recommend going with a 36 spoke build, especially if you are a heavier rider and carrying loaded panniers, higher spoke count makes the wheels much stronger. There are many good quality strong rims out there.You should do a search on the touring forum to get an idea which rims would best serve your purpose.
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Old 10-05-10, 06:08 PM   #9
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I'm very pleased with the disc brake wheelset I had built for my commuter last autumn.

I used a Shimano Alfine dynamo hub in front, and a Velocity 130mm disc hub in back (my frame is 130mm). Hoops are Velocity VXC (disc-brake specific) on each end, and everything's tied together with DT Competition double-butted spokes.

Strong, true, and great on rough roads.

FWIW, the Avid G3 rotors I used are fantastic as well. Like wheels, the more "spokes" a rotor has, the better it stays true. I havne't had to true the G3s at all in a year, where the other rotors I'd used (Deltas, and Avid Roundagon) required truing monthly.
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Old 10-05-10, 08:02 PM   #10
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How does one true a rotor? My bike, a 2010 Norco Ceres, has 8 "spokes" per rotor. The bike uses mechanical Shimano BR-M416 brakes with 160 mm rotors, but I don't know the brand of said rotors.
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Old 10-05-10, 08:10 PM   #11
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How does one true a rotor?
Bend it, preferably with a tool that fits smoothly yet snugly on the rotor.

Set the brake pads close to the rotor, close enough that you can hear a periodic "zing-zing-zing" drag, but not so close that they drag all the way around. As you spin the wheel, look inside the caliper to see which direction the rotor's wobbling, then bend that portion the other way.

When I say "bend", I obviously don't mean to yank on it with all your might. Just tug at it, check for clearance, and tug again as necessary. Always better to tug too lightly than to overdo it.
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Old 10-05-10, 08:11 PM   #12
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How does one true a rotor?
Bend it.

You can use hands, a crescent wrench, or, (Gasp!) Park Tool makes a specific tool for it. Before changing to the G3s, I got best results with just my hands. I started with the Park tool, but was always overdoing it. With my hands I can feel what's happening, and I can make smoother adjustments. takes about half the time too.
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Old 10-05-10, 09:09 PM   #13
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I have just about 5000 miles on my Mavic Speedcity wheels and am pretty happy with them. I have ridden them over some pretty rough stuff and they are still running true. I weight 185lbs and carry loaded panniers and run 25c gatorskins.
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Old 10-06-10, 07:13 AM   #14
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Speedcity wheels are pretty freaking bombproof, but I'll second the generator hub idea.

irclean, depends on your wheels, but the Deore front hub uses a Shimano Centerlock rotor, so options are limited. To true rotors I use a small crescent wrench.
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Old 10-06-10, 08:06 AM   #15
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irclean, depends on your wheels, but the Deore front hub uses a Shimano Centerlock rotor, so options are limited. To true rotors I use a small crescent wrench.
The Alfine generator hub also uses Centerlock rotor attachment, but Shimano sells an elegant and fairly fool-proof adapter for standard ISO rotors. Runs about $25 for the adapter, and another $10ish for the Centerlock wrench head from Park Tool.
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Old 10-06-10, 08:12 AM   #16
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Open Pros on Shimano M775s. DT db spokes.

Use them for mountain biking sometimes too.
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Old 10-06-10, 08:52 AM   #17
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The Alfine generator hub also uses Centerlock rotor attachment, but Shimano sells an elegant and fairly fool-proof adapter for standard ISO rotors. Runs about $25 for the adapter, and another $10ish for the Centerlock wrench head from Park Tool.
I was also gonna mention the Problem Solvers Centerlock-to-ISO 6-bolt adapter:
http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ock+To+Is.aspx
http://problemsolversbike.com/index...._rotor_adapter

I've seen these at several LBSes in my area, too, so they should be easy to find.
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Old 10-06-10, 09:29 AM   #18
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another $10ish for the Centerlock wrench head from Park Tool.
You don't need a special wrench for CenterLock rotors. The same one you use for your cassette works on CenterLock rotors.
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Old 10-06-10, 09:38 AM   #19
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You don't need a special wrench for CenterLock rotors. The same one you use for your cassette works on CenterLock rotors.
That's what I meant. I bought it specifically to move my front rotor to my Alfine hub.
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Old 10-06-10, 10:51 AM   #20
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You don't need a special wrench for CenterLock rotors. The same one you use for your cassette works on CenterLock rotors.
Maybe. I had an older Park one that didn't fit over the end of the axel with enough length to engage the teeth of the lockring. The new ones are all long enough, it seems.
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Old 10-06-10, 11:34 AM   #21
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So if i go the build my own route, will a mtb hub take a 10sp road cassette? Will open pros be the best options? What about a 29er rim, considering that I will be running at least a 28c tire? Also, I prefer cartridge bearing hubs, but dont want to spend 200+ on just a hub... are there any cheaper cartridge style options out there?
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Old 10-06-10, 02:04 PM   #22
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So if i go the build my own route, will a mtb hub take a 10sp road cassette? Will open pros be the best options? What about a 29er rim, considering that I will be running at least a 28c tire? Also, I prefer cartridge bearing hubs, but dont want to spend 200+ on just a hub... are there any cheaper cartridge style options out there?
I have the Speedcitys, and am very happy with them. They are a little lighter, and I think a little stronger than the Open Pro/disc hub build. Keep in mind that Speedcitys are made for road width tires, whereas a typical 29er rim is made for offroad width tires, so make sure you get the rim that will accept the tires you want to use. I run 23-28mm road tires on the Speedcitys, and 1.6" MTB slicks and 1.75" studded winter tires on my 26" wheelset.
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Old 10-06-10, 05:32 PM   #23
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will a mtb hub take a 10sp road cassette?
8, 9 and 10-speed all fit the same freehub body.

Will open pros be the best options?
Some people like them, some people prefer others.

What about a 29er rim, considering that I will be running at least a 28c tire?
The Velocity VXC hoops I used on mine are wider (23.5mm) although not called a 29er rim. I like the wider rims with 28s, and especially with my 35mm snow tires. I could tell the difference immediately coming from "standard" 19mm rims.

Also, I prefer cartridge bearing hubs, but dont want to spend 200+ on just a hub... are there any cheaper cartridge style options out there?
Look into Velocity hubs. I used their 130mm rear disc hub on my build ($140 list) and have been pleased with it so far. It's been only a year, so I can't speak to long-term yet.
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Old 10-06-10, 06:00 PM   #24
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You don't need a special wrench for CenterLock rotors. The same one you use for your cassette works on CenterLock rotors.
Actually, not always. I have a rear wheel sitting here that will make you eat those words :-) 135mm width, tool runs out of depth before it engages.
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Old 10-06-10, 08:22 PM   #25
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Schmidt uses 6 bolt rotors., though they also offer a centerlock model.
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