Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    It started raining, what do I do now?

    I have been commuting for about 2 months, and have enjoyed it thoroughly. Today it is raining. I don't have a problem getting wet, but was wondering if there were any safety issues with riding on racing slicks, I have Ritchey race slick tires (700 x 23). I don't want to start home and realize I am going to most likely eat **** at some point. The rain is light, but there will be a nice slick surface on the road.

    Is this going to be dangerous with my tires? or should I be OK if I ride cautiously
    .

  2. #2
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,395
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The typical bike tire can't hydroplane until over 100 MPH, so you don't have to worry about that part.

    Just be careful with the reduced grip of wet roads. Painted and plastic road markings, tar strips, and metal are especially slippery, as are wet leaves in the road. Brake earlier to clear the rims too.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bhop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Via Nirone 7, Jamis Sputnik
    Posts
    1,890
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Pros race in the rain with race slicks.. just sayin..

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PNW - Victoria, BC
    My Bikes
    2002 Litespeed Vortex - 2007 Trek Madone 5.9 - 2004 Redline Conquest Pro - Specialized S-Works Festina Team Model - 93 Cannondale M 800 Beast of the East
    Posts
    1,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    The typical bike tire can't hydroplane until over 100 MPH, so you don't have to worry about that part.

    Just be careful with the reduced grip of wet roads. Painted and plastic road markings, tar strips, and metal are especially slippery, as are wet leaves in the road. Brake earlier to clear the rims too.
    +1

    Your best option for normal but wet roads is getting tires with a slick (no tread features) tire with a grippy compound. As for paint, man-hole covers, gratings..... listen to tsl.... he knows what he speaks of.

    Or, you can listen to Sheldon Brown:

    Tread for on-road use

    Bicycle tires for on-road use have no need of any sort of tread features; in fact, the best road tires are perfectly smooth, with no tread at all!


    Unfortunately, most people assume that a smooth tire will be slippery, so this type of tire is difficult to sell to unsophisticated cyclists. Most tire makers cater to this by putting a very fine pattern on their tires, mainly for cosmetic and marketing reasons. If you examine a section of asphalt or concrete, you'll see that the texture of the road itself is much "knobbier" than the tread features of a good quality road tire. Since the tire is flexible, even a slick tire deforms as it comes into contact with the pavement, acquiring the shape of the pavement texture, only while in contact with the road.

    People ask, "But don't slick tires get slippery on wet roads, or worse yet, wet metal features such as expansion joints, paint stripes, or railroad tracks?" The answer is, yes, they do. So do tires with tread. All tires are slippery in these conditions. Tread features make no improvement in this.
    Guy K. Browne

    Schwalbe North America
    USA | CANADA | Central/South America
    1-888-700-5860 | 250-598-0397 ext.105
    www.schwalbetires.com

  5. #5
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    WEST NEW YORK, USA
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott CR1 Pro carbon, 2013 Brompton S6L-X titanium, 2013 Citizen Tokyo steel
    Posts
    3,117
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    biking in the rain on Bontrager Racelite slicks, 700X25

  6. #6
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,871
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Just be more vigilant, and get most of your stopping power from the front wheel. Paint or metal in the road will make your tires slide - it can be effectively the same thing as hydroplaning. If you go over a metal slab, keep in a straight line, and don't brake until you get to the other side.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the advice guys.

  8. #8
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    My Bikes
    Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    29,674
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If this is the first rain in months, be very careful of oil that seeps up from the asphalt, particularly at intersections. You should be fine, just take it easy.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

  9. #9
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    ariZona carbon fiber tandem & single
    Posts
    9,975
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You could always use a bit less pressure in your tires for a larger footprint on the pavement.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PNW - Victoria, BC
    My Bikes
    2002 Litespeed Vortex - 2007 Trek Madone 5.9 - 2004 Redline Conquest Pro - Specialized S-Works Festina Team Model - 93 Cannondale M 800 Beast of the East
    Posts
    1,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Beyond all the advice, I actually enjoy riding in the rain, once I'm out and in it..... unless it's below 40 degrees, then it can get a bit miserable.
    Guy K. Browne

    Schwalbe North America
    USA | CANADA | Central/South America
    1-888-700-5860 | 250-598-0397 ext.105
    www.schwalbetires.com

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    2010 Kona Dr. Dew, Yuba Mundo V3, 2009 Diamondback Kalamar
    Posts
    798
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    The typical bike tire can't hydroplane until over 100 MPH, so you don't have to worry about that part.
    At one point I figured out that you could potentially hydroplane on ~30 psi tires if you got up to around 40 or 45 mph. That's unlikely to happen.

  12. #12
    Single-serving poster electrik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,097
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hydroplane on a bicycle tire and you'd be on your butt quick... thankfully you have to be going very fast! What is more dangerous is rain washing away all the micro-grit that gives your bicycle tire grip. Usually road paint, sewer grates and street-car tracks are gonna get ya!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Aurora, CO
    My Bikes
    CAAD9-1, Windsor Cliff 29er
    Posts
    1,306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've often heard the argument that bike tires can't hydroplane. That's all well and good, but is hydroplaning the only cause of a tire slipping? I honestly don't know, but I doubt it. It seems like debunking hydroplaning is a bit of a straw man argument, people don't care how they go down in the rain, just whether or not they do.

  14. #14
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Des Moines
    My Bikes
    1974 Huffy 3 speed
    Posts
    9,086
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Arcanum View Post
    At one point I figured out that you could potentially hydroplane on ~30 psi tires if you got up to around 40 or 45 mph. That's unlikely to happen.
    I would consider this an arcanum. And also likely to give yourself a severe charley horse.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,871
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234 View Post
    I've often heard the argument that bike tires can't hydroplane. That's all well and good, but is hydroplaning the only cause of a tire slipping? I honestly don't know, but I doubt it. It seems like debunking hydroplaning is a bit of a straw man argument, people don't care how they go down in the rain, just whether or not they do.
    I think you're right.

    Like most people in this thread have pointed out, anything other than pavement ( or dirt ) is dangerous when things get wet. Metal grating means your tires have very little traction, and could lose their grip if you messed up. Same with paint, like road striping. Or leaves on the edge of the road. Or even some pavement - stuff you're more likely to find in urban parks where bikes shouldn't be anyway. Watch out for all of this stuff. Don't turn too steeply here.

    I've locked my rear wheel a couple of times when it was wet and I had to make panic stops. The back wheel starts to slide sideways in an arc ... it's scary for a split second, until you let up. Rely mostly on the front brake; the weight moving forward as you stop keeps the tire pressed up against the roadway.

    This is probably obvious, but don't lean as far into turns because you have less contact area with the road this way, and your tires already have less grip.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  16. #16
    One-track, one-speed mind XianRL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    My Bikes
    Surly Karate Monkey, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Rustbelt Marco polo bike
    Posts
    358
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Now on to the part about not getting too wet, right?

  17. #17
    Daily Rider hairlessbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    89 Bridgestone MB-3, 93 Bridgestone RB-1,93 Bridgestone MB-1, 95 Klein Fervor, 02 BikeE AT, 06 Surly Cross-check, 8? Schwinn Frontier
    Posts
    638
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One word: fenders.

  18. #18
    Bike addict, dreamer AdamDZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Queens, New York
    My Bikes
    Surly Disc trucker (DIY), Fuji Reveal 1.0 (DIY MTB), Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    5,161
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And avoid puddles, they may be hiding unpleasant surprises!

    For not getting wet in cold temps it's hard to beat Pearl Izumi's Amfib tights and bibs. O2 rain shells are cheap and effective for the upper body. Columbia hiking outerwear is also good and they often have sales or look for an outlet shop.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    736
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rain is great riding, but you do have less grip. I've never fallen due to rain, though, and it's unlikely you will. Slicks are actually better in rain because they give you more contact surface. I have skidded my rear tire on a couple of occasions, but it's easy to recover from a fishtail.

    Go slow on corners, and give yourself lost of braking distance. Enjoy.

  20. #20
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker, 1999 Jamis Exile
    Posts
    2,846
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just be more cautious when riding in the rain.
    lil brown bat wrote:
    Wow, aren't other people stupid? It's a good thing that we're so smart. Yay us.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Painted and plastic road markings, tar strips, and metal are especially slippery, as are wet leaves in the road.
    This is great advice. When riding on wet roads, try not to roll over anything that isn't asphalt.

    Beyond all the advice, I actually enjoy riding in the rain, once I'm out and in it..... unless it's below 40 degrees, then it can get a bit miserable.
    Funny, that's when I enjoy riding in the rain the most because I can wear as much as I want and not get too hot or wet. I dislike summer rain the most because anything that will protect against the rain will be too hot, so my only option is to get wet, which I don't like.

  22. #22
    Single-serving poster electrik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,097
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is some bonus seasonal advice, never turn or brake on wet fallen leaves!!

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    My Bikes
    Gerry Fisher Nirvana, LeMond Buenos Aires
    Posts
    1,035
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234 View Post
    I've often heard the argument that bike tires can't hydroplane. That's all well and good, but is hydroplaning the only cause of a tire slipping? I honestly don't know, but I doubt it. It seems like debunking hydroplaning is a bit of a straw man argument, people don't care how they go down in the rain, just whether or not they do.
    The Michellin web site, clearly posts that Hydroplaning is not a problem with bike tires... but as you note, things can get slippery. The problem is that knobby tires are worse than slicks on normal roads. At the end of the month I'll be switching over to my Nokia W109's. I can tell you that I can notice that they have less grip on dry and rainy days than my slicks. Once the snow comes out, the Winter tires are infinitly better with gripping in a few inches of snow. A slick tire would get no grip, but I can power my way throught he snow. On icy roads, the carbite steel studs dig in and give me far more traction and grip than I'd have trying to walk. I can always tell in winter when I am hittting black ice, because my tires get quiet. As other pointe dout painted lines, and steel cover plates are probably the greatest risk, as these can be slick as snot. Just be sure to go easy in the rain.

    Happy riding,
    André

  24. #24
    ride for a change modernjess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-check & Moonlander, Pivot Mach 429, Ted Wojcik Sof-Trac, Ridley Orion. Santa Cruz Stigmata
    Posts
    2,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love riding in the rain. It's sort of a small yet welcome challenge. Heed the advice posted above. It's all good.

  25. #25
    Fred on Foot dwilbur3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sacramento
    My Bikes
    None right now
    Posts
    740
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 Slow down
    +1 Slicks
    +1 Fenders
    Disk brakes are also great and grippy tires. I had some Armadillos that slid all around, but my Marathon Supremes get good grip on wet pavement.

    AND, you really don't want to change a tire in the rain, so I'd make sure I had some decent flat protection

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •