Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I'm going to have to rethink my requirements for a commuter

    After riding my current (and only) bike for the past few months, I thought that I'd like to try something different. I was thinking that something a bit more sporty, lighter and more agile, say like flat barred road bike.

    But after today... all that goes out the window. I took an unplanned test spin on a GF Sawyer. Huge tires compared to my 26x1.5's. Never experienced disc brakes before, and this thing had hydro's- I locked the rear (and skidded) without even trying. I even got the thing airborne launching off of the curb. As much fun as this bike was, It's not for me due to it's price and styling.

    So, basically, what are some models out there that would be considered "Urban Assault" or "overbuilt" for commuting in the city and on paved MUPs? I have a couple in mind already, but there maybe something out there that I'm unaware of. Requirements are it be a 29er, have disc brakes, and sticker under a grand.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,446
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A 622-35 tire bike would be more realistic as a day to day bike ,
    maybe one with the new Alfine IG 11 speed hub, or the good enough 8 speed model..

    what do you have for parking at the jobsite..secure?or just a sign post on the curb to lock onto ?

    IG Hubs are very good for commuters , change to your start out gear while stopped at the light, though the light changed and you stopped,
    while you were in High gear,
    just 1 advantage.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 12-19-10 at 12:22 PM.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    A 622-35 tire bike would be more realistic as a day to day bike ,
    maybe one with the new Alfine IG 11 speded hub, or the good enough 8 speed model..

    what do you have for parking at the jobsite..secure?or just a sign post on the curb to lock onto ?
    Current job parking is secure. On fair weather days, it goes in the break room (tile floor), foul weather days it goes to the work floor (concrete). Video cameras everywhere.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,446
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ride my Derailler bikes little these days , IG hubs work so well ,
    and recent ones have such a wide ratio range ..
    and you can put a chain guard trouser protection
    over that chain to keep your pants out of the dirt from the chain

    Civia from QBP is a frame to start with in the off the shelf stuff
    QBP is the Big Dog of US distributors owns Salsa and Surly brands
    all made under contract by the big contract bike companys in Asia.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Civia Bryant is a sweet frame, but too pricey for me @ $625 for the frame and fork. I'm sure that IGH would be nice, but I feel that disc brakes are higher on my list. Models that feature both disc and IGH get up to that $1k ceiling pretty fast.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  6. #6
    Tawp Dawg GriddleCakes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    My Bikes
    '06 Surly Pugsley, '14 Surly Straggler, '88 Kuwahara Xtracycle, '10 Motobecane Outcast 29er, '?? Surly Cross Check (wife's), '00 Trek 4500 (wife's), '12 Windsor Oxford 3-speed (dogs')
    Posts
    1,222
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're willing to build a bike up instead of buy a complete bike, you might want to think about a Motobecane 29er frame. $165 for the frame, plus about $70 for a Surly 29er fork, comes to $225 for a frameset. A pair of Avid BB7s (which rock, btw) are running about $105 on Amazon, JensonUSA has a 29'r wheelset for $100, which would bring you to $430 for frame, fork, brakes, and wheels. The rest you could pull over from your old bike, if you've already got a MTB.

    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    A 622-35 tire bike would be more realistic as a day to day bike...
    Ten years as an urban cyclist, and the narrowest tire that I've ever run was 38mm. My current tires run 622-54 in the winter (Nokian Gazza Extremes) and 622-50 in the summer (Schwalbe Big Apples), and I'm thinking of sizing the summer tires up to 622-60 for next summer. I ride these every day and, realistically, and they work just fine. The Big Apples are super smooth, surprisingly fast, and soooooooo cushy.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    2,834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    The Civia Bryant is a sweet frame, but too pricey for me @ $625 for the frame and fork. I'm sure that IGH would be nice, but I feel that disc brakes are higher on my list. Models that feature both disc and IGH get up to that $1k ceiling pretty fast.
    civia hyland frame is on close out at qbp 250

  8. #8
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,538
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No1mad, you've been back-and-forth on this new bike thing for far too long now. I think you're putting much too much thought into it.

    Over the course of the next few years, you can own one of every type of bike you've been discussing. What that means is that you needn't put so much pressure on yourself to get exactly the right bike now. Pick one of the dozens you've been considering, ride it and have fun. Then a year or two from now, buy a different one.

    When I started out, I bought a new or new-to-me bike every nine months, like clockwork, although I recognized the pattern only in retrospect. I still own two of those bikes and have added two more in the past year. Each one is a little different, I love them all, and have the luxury now of picking the perfect bike for whatever ride I'm about to embark upon. Even commuting--I use them all depending on the day.

    So don't sweat it. You don't have to pick the perfect bike now for forever. Pick one, ride it, love it, and repeat. N+1 is a wonderful thing!
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  9. #9
    This bike is cat approved monsterpile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    My Bikes
    To many to list...
    Posts
    1,528
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are plenty of BD bikes that fit your expectations and you can add plenty onto them before you get to your upper limit. I agree with tsl you won't find the perfect bike, but it doesn't hurt to look. I tend to find deals on bikes that I can ride for a while to see what I like. Personally I like the feeling of my 26 inch mountain bike for commuting so far, but I guess I haven't tried a 29er yet.
    My SUV is a bicycle

  10. #10
    Tawp Dawg GriddleCakes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    My Bikes
    '06 Surly Pugsley, '14 Surly Straggler, '88 Kuwahara Xtracycle, '10 Motobecane Outcast 29er, '?? Surly Cross Check (wife's), '00 Trek 4500 (wife's), '12 Windsor Oxford 3-speed (dogs')
    Posts
    1,222
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This $800 Bikesdirect.com 29er's got hydraulic discs, and a (single) lower rear fender/rack eyelet. No seat stay braze-ons, so you'd have to use P-clamps on the seat stays to mount a rack. I just built up a Motobecane Outcast 29 as my new commuter, and when I was looking up 29er frames to buy, I had a hard time finding 29ers with rack/fender braze-ons. My new ride has seat stay braze-ons but no eyelets at the drop out (I know, WTF, right?). I just altered the lower rack attachment to bolt directly to the sliding drop out bolt.

    If the OP is willing to forgo a rear disc brake, I'd recommend this Motobecane. $350 for a complete bike + $70 for a disc-compatible fork + $55 for an Avid BB7 front brake = $475 for a complete SS 29er with a front disc brake and full fender and rack eyelets and braze-ons. If you want some gears, you can pick up a Handspun wheel with an Alfine 8 IGH for $240 and a shifter for another $20 (trigger shifter will run you about $50), which will get you an 8-speed internally geared 29er, ready to be commuterfied, for $735. A set of Schwalbe Big Apples or Fat Franks will run you another $90 or so, and you'll have tires for both pavement and dirt. This is the frame that I would've gone with, if I could've found it in my size.

  11. #11
    Senior Member dynodonn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    6,868
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    .....Pick one of the dozens you've been considering, ride it and have fun. Then a year or two from now, buy a different one......
    Agreed, I now limit myself to one bike purchase or build up a year. I usually buy/build in the Spring, that way I get one summer and winter under my belt to take notes.
    Take lots of notes!

  12. #12
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I know that I've been throwing up a bunch of 'which bike/ thoughts on __' threads of late. It's just like I feel a virgin walking into a brothel... so many choices!!

    But part of the dilema is the local shops- I'm limited to what they offer. Though the brand selection is decent (Giant, Specialized, Trek, Felt, Kona, Marin, KHS, Scott, Raleigh/Diamondback, Bianchi, Fuji, Look, Litespeed, Orbea, Schwinn, GT, a few others that escape me atm... hell, even the 'bents are represented with Sun/EZ Racers, Greenspeed, Catrike, and Rans) the shops only stock what the owner/staff thinks will sell.

    Most of the clientele that shops at the LBS are either the local road riding club member, the off roaders who go bombing down Turkey Mountain (y'all in CO would laugh), with a few "just need something for the MUP" thrown in. So, the shops are catering to their market.

    As far as special orders go:

    -Shop A told me that if they had to order something for me, I had to buy it. No returns or exchanges was even mentioned by them. And that was for a brand that they carry (GT), but not a model that they stock (Traffic 3.0). Might as well go BD with that attitude.
    -Shop B was more helpful. They could order a Redline Metro 9 no problem, as they stock the Conquest for the blooming CX scene. But it would also be a bit more like the "buy before you try" scenario, however they did say that they should be able to return it for a restocking fee + freight if I was unhappy with it.
    -Shop C might be willing to do an exchange for something off the floor, but i've been in there so much inquiring about this model or that one (kinda like I've been doing here of late) that their once warm attitude has cooled somewhat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  13. #13
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,538
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since it seems to be a case of an overwhelming variety of choices, then maybe the old advice, "shop for a store, then shop for their bike" is the place to start. That eliminates a lot of choices right there.

    Your second requirement--sticker under a grand--also eliminates a whole lot of choices.

    By then you should be down to only three or four choices. At that point, just go with your gut. Over-analyzing will lead only to buyer's remorse. You'll be unhappy with whatever you buy.

    Instead, take a stab at it, and make the decision to like the bike, even if it turns out to be completely wrong for you. You *will* learn from the experience and be able to refine you choices for the next bike.

    Remember, the purpose of your first bike is to teach you what you want and need in your second bike. Likewise, your second bike is there to teach you what you want and need in your third bike.

    Instead of wallowing in indecision, become a willing student.

    My first bike was completely wrong for me, although I had no way of knowing that. While my eye kept being drawn to road bikes, my practical, over-analytical side followed the LBS's advice for an over-50s guy who wanted to ride three or four miles to work. I left with a hybrid, which I later figured out was a size too small besides.

    It was completely the wrong bike for me. It was heavy, slow, handled like a barge, and climbed like it was dragging an anvil uphill. Yet, I put 3,850 miles on that bike while I had it, 3,500 of them before I bought a second bike. And despite the mismatch, I enjoyed nearly every mile.

    I was still unsure when I bought the second bike, so I went used. I waited for the right thing to come along--a road bike, 58cm frame, that needed some work, and had contemporary STI shifters. I didn't want downtube shifters.

    On paper--with its race geometry, low front-end, skinny tires and all--it's a crummy choice for a commuter. I love it. It even had rack and fender eyelets. Four years and 6,000 miles later, it's still one of my favorite rides.

    Yet, it wasn't "perfect", something you seem to be looking for. But it taught me what to look for in my next bike, and nine months later, I was confident enough to drop just over two grand (including rack and accessories) on my beloved Portland.

    And you know what? That bike isn't "perfect" either. It's a wonderful ride, and if I could own only one bike, that would be the one, but there are things about it I would prefer to be different. BFD.

    My fourth and fifth bikes have each taught me new things as well.

    Although you'd never hear someone give the advice to buy an all-out criterium racing bike for inner city commuting, my crit bike (the 4th) is a hoot to ride in the daily slice-and-dice of stop-and-go city traffic. I arrive at work not just smiling, but laughing. I'm not tired from racing cars, I'm full of P&V, ready to start my day. No rack or fenders or mounts for them either, yet for the days when I'm not hauling stuff, it's a great "commuter".

    My point here is "commuter" is not a style of bike, it's a ride that you take. You seem to be drawn to sportier rides than you already have. Go with that feeling. You have a fallback in the bike you already own. You can afford a little experimentation with your next bike.

    So whittle down the choices of shops, whittle down the choices within your chosen shop, and decide based on what you think you need the bike to *teach* you. Write the check--call it tuition if you want--and begin your lessons. With an attitude like that, even the wrong bike will be the right choice.
    Last edited by tsl; 12-19-10 at 06:43 PM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sage advice as usual, tsl. I can shop for the Shop by eliminating 3 based upon location alone, which takes Marin, Masi, Scott, GT, Orbea, Litespeed, Look, and Raleigh/Diamondback off the table. That leaves two Trek shops (same owner), two shops that feature Giant, Felt, Kona, and KHS (again, one owner) and one that has Specialized and Bianchi. These brands all have models that appeal to me at a price I can afford; the list does not include brands/models that could be special ordered.

    That still leaves a bunch of bikes to wade through on paper, but in reality, the selection will be a bit easier if I just limit it to what is on the floor. But I've already basically narrowed it down to just that are on the floor- the Giant Escape City (has all the goodies included), and the Specialized Sirrus Sport. I can get either for $500, but the Giant has that extra value added in with the included accessories.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  15. #15
    Digging in the pain cave. midschool22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    698
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another option might be the Redline Monocog 29er. I tried riding a Trek 4500 for commuting and I hated it. On a whim, I tried the Monocog. Bought it on the spot. One gear, big 29 inch wheels and v brakes. With a price tag of $499, you will have plenty of cash leftover to add disc brakes to it and whatever else you may want for under a grand. Here is the 2011 model-


  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    2010 Kona Dr. Dew, Yuba Mundo V3, 2009 Diamondback Kalamar
    Posts
    798
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    Sage advice as usual, tsl. I can shop for the Shop by eliminating 3 based upon location alone, which takes Marin, Masi, Scott, GT, Orbea, Litespeed, Look, and Raleigh/Diamondback off the table. That leaves two Trek shops (same owner), two shops that feature Giant, Felt, Kona, and KHS (again, one owner) and one that has Specialized and Bianchi. These brands all have models that appeal to me at a price I can afford; the list does not include brands/models that could be special ordered.

    That still leaves a bunch of bikes to wade through on paper, but in reality, the selection will be a bit easier if I just limit it to what is on the floor.
    You don't necessarily have to limit to models on the floor. Many/most brands have multiple variants of a particular bike. You could use what's on the floor to evaluate geometry fit, then order whatever variant of that bike has the features you want. That's what I did when I bought my Kona Dr. Dew back in February. I checked out an appropriately-sized Dew Plus at the shop, decided I liked the geometry and fit, and had them order the Dr. Dew.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,888
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Schwinn Super Sport DBX can take up to 35c tires. Its not as light or fast as a road bike but its not meant to be. An adventure bike is built to haul stuff comfortably and for that purpose its a great bike. Oh and the disc brakes help with stopping in all weather conditions. When you want to commute or go on rails to trails journey, overbuilt is a good thing in a bike.

  18. #18
    This bike is cat approved monsterpile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    My Bikes
    To many to list...
    Posts
    1,528
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After riding that bike what did you learn you wanted? I hear you wanting disc brakes. How wide of tires do you really want for a commute that you are hoping to add miles to over time? I don't know how overbuilt you really need for a commute. A 29er seems like something that would fit alot of what you are looking for. Like I said ask yourself what that Trek made you want and add that to what you already know you want.
    My SUV is a bicycle

  19. #19
    Senior Member crdean1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    '06 Litespeed Siena
    Posts
    402
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I also rode the Sawyer the other day. What an awesome bike. I agree, pretty expensive though. But very nice.

  20. #20
    Old, but not really wise CptjohnC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Fairfax, VA commuting to Washington DC
    My Bikes
    2010 Kona Dew Drop (the daily driver),'07 Specialized Roubaix (the sports car), '99 ish Kona NuNu MTB (the SUV), Schwinn High Plains (circa 1992?) (the beater)
    Posts
    811
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    Since it seems to be a case of an overwhelming variety of choices, then maybe the old advice, "shop for a store, then shop for their bike" is the place to start. That eliminates a lot of choices right there.
    THIS! In spades.

    Honestly, pick the shop you feel best with - it will likely matter far more over the long haul. Then, look at their offerings, and figure out which one you like best for now.

    If you buy a quality bike, and it isn't quite perfect, it will retain enough value that you'll be able to get plenty out of it if you decide to trade /sell it to buy #2. Or, better, if you can you keep it and buy #2. And then #3. No one bike can really do it all -- just as no one car or motorcycle or boat or pair of pants or kitchen gadget or... you get the idea. But if you find one that you like and that will do most of what you want, you'll be happy.

  21. #21
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by monsterpile View Post
    After riding that bike what did you learn you wanted? I hear you wanting disc brakes. How wide of tires do you really want for a commute that you are hoping to add miles to over time? I don't know how overbuilt you really need for a commute. A 29er seems like something that would fit alot of what you are looking for. Like I said ask yourself what that Trek made you want and add that to what you already know you want.
    That Sawyer pretty much sold me on disc brakes; other than that, it just felt like a fun bike. The fact the frame could run various drive trains- SS/FG, RD, IGH, Belt Drive, even a Rohloff was also of interest. But have my doubts that it would be something that I'd like to put miles on day in and day out.

    I think I'll peruse the 29er's and see if there is anything that I feel might be a better fit for my commute. Seems like a lot of mtb's offer disc brakes at a lower price point than the performance hybrid/ flat bar roadies do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  22. #22
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NE OK
    My Bikes
    '06 Kona Smoke
    Posts
    8,026
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CptjohnC View Post
    THIS! In spades.

    Honestly, pick the shop you feel best with - it will likely matter far more over the long haul. Then, look at their offerings, and figure out which one you like best for now.
    Well, there is actually a couple of shops that generally give me the "warm and fuzzy" when I talk to them. Plus, they both have space set aside to fit someone on a bike- it's either rollers or a trainer, I'm just not sure. My old LBS where I bought my current bike just checked the stand over, did a quick seat height adjustment, and out the door I went.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    4,332
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
    civia hyland frame is on close out at qbp 250
    The Civia Highland frame is rated by for a max tire size of 35c by Civia. You might be able to fit a 40c on if you didn't have fenders on it, but you can't put any huge tires on it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •