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Thread: Kona Dew Plus

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    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Kona Dew Plus

    I believe that I will give this one a shot. However, my LBS doesn't have any on the floor. I'm toying with the idea of asking about any leftover 2010 models that may be in the pipeline somewhere or just get the 2011 version.

    The main differences are slight changes in geo, mechanical to hydro discs, and tire width went from 37 to 35.

    As the Dew line features IGH at the upper end, I should have no problems converting in the future if I want to explore that route. But I do *want* the disc brakes. Only other options would be either the Trek PDX (don't like the cable routing) or the Giant Seek 2.
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    Born Again Pagan irclean's Avatar
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    The Dew Plus has vertical dropouts, whereas the IGH offerings in the Dew lineup do not: The Dr. Good has horizontal dropouts and the Dr. Fine has a sliding dropout setup. To convert the Plus to IGH you would need to run a chain tensioner or an eccentric BB.
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    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Disc brakes are really nice in wet weather. I can feel a huge difference between my bike with and without in terms of stopping power in the rain.
    Don't believe everything you think.

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    Pro Paper Plane Pilot wunderkind's Avatar
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    Since the rear brake contributes little to stop the bike, I find rear disc unnecessary and only adds weight. Not to mention limits one's choices for rear racks.
    Are there still bikes made with front disc brake only?

    BTW, I am a fan of the Kona line.... only at the extreme end of the model line. Kona Dew at the base model because it is simple and possibly lightest with the exception with the highest end - Dew PhD which is my other favourite.
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    Tawp Dawg GriddleCakes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wunderkind View Post
    Since the rear brake contributes little to stop the bike, I find rear disc unnecessary and only adds weight. Not to mention limits one's choices for rear racks.
    Are there still bikes made with front disc brake only?
    Weight and necessity aside, both models of the Dew Plus and the Giant Seek 2 that no1mad posted have the rear disc mounted on the chainstay, which eliminates any rack compatibility issues. Salsa has a few models that do the same, as will the Surly Troll, whenever it comes out.

    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    As the Dew line features IGH at the upper end, I should have no problems converting in the future if I want to explore that route. But I do *want* the disc brakes.
    Of the IGH Dew bikes, the Dr.Good has semi-horizontal dropouts and the Dr.Fine has sliding rear dropouts to tension the chain. The rest of the line has vertical dropouts, which make them no more or less IGH compatible than any other bike; you'll have to either run a chain tensioner, or find a gear ratio that fits the frame. Of the two IGH bikes, only the Dr.Good has eyelets for a rear rack and fenders; to mount a rear rack on the Dr.Fine, you'll have to figure out a work-around, like so:



    If you plan on upgrading to an IGH later on, I'd say to just spring for the Dr.Good. Like wunderkind said, front disc is plenty, you can mount whatever racks and fenders you want easily, and a rear roller brake is about as low maintenance as they come.

    edit: heh, didn't read the thread, Irclean already explained the dropouts
    Last edited by GriddleCakes; 12-24-10 at 02:04 AM.

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    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    This is why I start threads like this- the feedback is invaluable.

    So what I've gathered so far is that:

    -Converting the Dew Plus to IGH in the future would be a bit more complicated than new wheel/hub/shifter.
    -Disc brakes do enhance the stopping power. What's debatable is the value of added weight/performance of the rear brake.
    -Location of a rear disc brake mount could lead to rack/fender issues.

    I decided to spend a little time trying to dig up info on the Dew and Seek over at RBR. Nada on the Seek, but there was a little on the Dew. Of course, someone had to go and post about what they had- a GF Wingra. Just as I thought I had it narrowed down...
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
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  7. #7
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    It seems like you're going about the whole buying-a-new-bike thing backwards. It really sounds like you're going around thinking "ooh that ones neat, and I like that one, and oh that one's shiny, that one would be fun" and on and on an on. You'll never buy a bike (or anything else) that way unless you just one day impulse buy something.

    Try this:
    1) Figure out how much money you can spend. It can be exact, "no more than $1125", or a ballpark "around $1000", but have a real number. When I did this, my number was "less than $1000".

    2a) Figure out what purpose the bike will serve. Commuting, obviously, but what else? Groceries? Rail trail riding? Winter riding?
    2b) Based on 2a, figure out what features you need and what features you want. For me, I needed a moderately aggressive flat bar bike with disc brakes that would hold up to lots of abuse and take a rack and fenders. I wanted an internally geared hub and an all-in-one dynohub+lights+rack solution.

    3) Identify what bikes actually meet your needs and wants within your budget.

    4) Of those, figure out which you could potentially get locally.

    5) Go try out the bikes you can try out, or close relatives thereof.

    At this point, you should have your list narrowed down pretty severely. This is more-or-less what I went through when I bought my Dr. Dew back in February. See this thread where I discussed it on here.

    Looking at that thread reminded me: If you want the Dr. Fine or Dr. Good, you may want to jump on one Right Now. When I tried to get a 2010 Dr. Fine in February they were completely and utterly sold out.

  8. #8
    Hooligan Abneycat's Avatar
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    There are plenty of bikes out there that offer a flat bar hybrid styling like the Dew Plus, with disc brakes and the ability to accept varied drive trains.

    Locally i've had rides on a derailleur equipped Civia Hyland and an MEC Shadowlands, both of which feature everything you are seemingly looking for (based on current info). Both came with disc brakes, a sliding dropout with derailleur tab, flat bar hybrid styling, and the chainstay disc mounting that will not interfere with normal racks / fenders.

    MEC has a line of 4 bicycles all with the same frame that has the sliding dropouts and inner mounted disc tabs. If you aren't in Canada, I don't know what their policy on international sales is.

    For IGH equipped bikes, I tried out the Brodie Ocho, which had an eccentric bottom bracket for tensioning, and of which I believe had a blank for a derailleur (although you have to check that an appropriate derailleur hanger IS available to replace the blank). Again, chainstay mounted disc brake tabs.

    My personal preference is certainly for the eccentric bottom bracket. It's very elegant and reliable, and i've picked my last 2 bikes with this as a factor, my current toy being a Globe Live 2. I equipped it with a front disc brake, and replaced the derailleur hanger blank with a full derailleur hanger (the plan is to purchase a SRAM dual drive for next year, for bike touring), it also has a chainstay mounted disc brake tab as well. If it wasn't such an upright piggie bike with a huge front basket, it might be what you want

    Basically, there are certainly choices out there that would probably suit your fancy. They have varying price ranges, materials, tire clearance, geometry, etc.. But all of that basic criteria so far can certainly be met.

    I definitely agree that it would help to think about what you want a little more, and provide a little more information.

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    My Schwinn Super Sport DBX is the quintessential commuting/adventure bike. Has a commuting bike geometry, drop bars, disc brakes and it will take fenders and large tires and accept racks. Something not possible with a road bike.

    The Salsa Vaya is also in this category of bikes. They superficially resemble the road bike but are capable of doing much more than a road bike: they're jack of all trades bike.

  10. #10
    Descends like a rock pallen's Avatar
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    If you're still looking at the Dew Plus, I would hold out for the hydro brakes. I have a Kona Dew Drop with cable operated discs and have been very happy with them, but my wife has a Kona Dr Lisa with the hydro disk brakes. Wow, huge difference in stopping power and modulation. They are possibly heavier, more difficult to setup, and impossible to repair on the side of the road should you have a problem with the hydraulic system (which is very unlikely), but I was very impressed with how they perform.

  11. #11
    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    Only other options would be either the Trek PDX (don't like the cable routing) or the Giant Seek 2.
    I own a Trek PDX. It's an alright bike after about $400 in upgrades, but out of the box it's pretty unimpressive. First thing you have to do is throw away the junk Promax mechanical discs and invest $100 in BB7's. They bill the bike as a "fast commuter" and it's really just the old FX disc hybrid with cheaper parts and different handlebars. Very upright riding position stock.

    I put carbon flat bars on it and different wheels/brakes, converted to LX triple in the front and Ultegra 9 speed in the rear and it's a solid commuter. But it's far from the $500 bike it started as. I think the only thing still original is the frame and seatpost.

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    The Salsa Vaya is also in this category of bikes. They superficially resemble the road bike but are capable of doing much more than a road bike: they're jack of all trades bike.
    I dunno if I'd categorize the Vaya where you have other than the jack of all trades part. I'm building one now (frame was an xmas present from the wife) . It's really a sloping geometry steel frame touring bike with discs that will also take very wide rubber. It's in a bit different class, pretty much between your DBX and a 29er MTB with a strong lean toward the 29'er side. I have 38mm cyclocross rubber on it at the moment and it's lost between the stays. Definitely almost get 1.95 rubber on it depending on the brand of tire.
    Last edited by CCrew; 12-28-10 at 06:26 PM.

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    There is a 56cm Kona Dew Drop on eBay right now. Don't know if it fits your needs but you might check it out.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Kona-Dew-drop-56...l%3FMyEbayBeta

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    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pallen View Post
    If you're still looking at the Dew Plus, I would hold out for the hydro brakes. I have a Kona Dew Drop with cable operated discs and have been very happy with them, but my wife has a Kona Dr Lisa with the hydro disk brakes. Wow, huge difference in stopping power and modulation. They are possibly heavier, more difficult to setup, and impossible to repair on the side of the road should you have a problem with the hydraulic system (which is very unlikely), but I was very impressed with how they perform.
    IIRC, the 2010 model had mechanical while the 2011 model is stated as having hydro's...
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
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    Mechanical Avid BB7s are very reliable. I see no need for upgrade to hydro disc brakes. Just my 2c worth.

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