Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 40
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Converting cross to commuter...am I making sense?

    I have been on a long quest to find the ultimate do it all bike. I was really zeroed in on the FX series but then I spied the Cannondale Bad Boy. I thought it might be a bit beefier and hold up better for my road/dirt path/grassy knoll travels. The one thing that worried me was the flatbars and lack of positioning. Then I found the Gary Fisher/Trek Lane. A steel cross bike with commuter specs. I liked it but felt the components were a bit weak for the price. Now I have mixed all these images in my head to come up with:

    what if I get the Cannondale CAADX with the matte black finish and tiagra components? If you add street tires to it, isn't it bascially a Bad Boy with drops? I had a specialized cross bike and had problems with my toes hitting the front wheel on tight turns, is that par for the course with all cross bikes?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    11,076
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I have a Novara ( REI brand ) cyclocross bike. For a while I basically used it for everything; because it was the go-to machine for long weekend rides, I kept it as light as I could. When I got a road bike, I put fenders, panniers, and the whole nine yards on the cross bike. It's heavy ( although the frame was a bit heavy to begin with ), but it works very well. It's pretty comfortable for commuting and it's strong enough to take on the trails - when those panniers mean having food and an extra layer.

    With street tires ( 28 mm, which work decently enough on dirt trails with light gravel ) and a tiagra/105 mix, it's a great bike. I'd definitely recommend the same kind of thing. Cross bikes are incredibly versatile.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  3. #3
    Senior Member warnette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    56
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I second that. I use a tricross singlecross as a commuter and love it. Its got all the needed mounts and if comfortable with out feeling sluggish. They only thing I wish it had are tabs for disk brakes.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    36
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 for the cross bike. I bought a completely stock 2000 Jamis Nova a couple of months ago to replace the '03 Specialized Allez I had been using for commuting. I haven't kitted it out with racks, fenders etc. but the wider,knobby cross tires and the steel frame make the commute that much more enjoyable.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Southeast
    My Bikes
    cyclotank
    Posts
    720
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    2008 Tricross Comp commuterized. CX is an ultimate machine for high-speed long-distance commute. Just make sure you have enough bosses to put all the bells and whistles. And brakes tend to be more sensitive to good adjustment.

    Have fun

    SF
    I take great pride in my humility.

  6. #6
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    7,721
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The true race cross bikes often don't have the eyelets for fenders/racks/etc., but many (most?) of the lower end ones do.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by himespau View Post
    The true race cross bikes often don't have the eyelets for fenders/racks/etc., but many (most?) of the lower end ones do.
    It is an inflammatory statement to say that only lower end cross bikes have eyelets for fenders and racks. I read in another thread in the cyclo-cross subforum that the geometry of different cross bikes have varied intended uses. Some 'cross bikes are actually engineered to be good jack of all trades suited to doing a little bit of everything including commuting. Although they may not be amazing at cyclo-cross racing, I wouldn't call cross commuter bikes low-end.

  8. #8
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    7,721
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ok, that may be true, I was just thinking that I'd read that the cf race cx bikes with the higher end components (and therefore more expensive) were less likely to have the eyelets, but you may have a different experience.

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,320
    Mentioned
    48 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The true race cross bikes often don't have the eyelets for fenders/racks/etc.
    that's because the races are only an Hour long,
    and anyhow so many people bought Bianchi Volpe's
    that other manufacturers supply something similar
    a touring bike with a bit lighter tube set ,
    and shorter chainstays. stick a rack on it and you Might as well build up a touring frame ,
    and not kick your luggage, panniers, on the rack, so often.

    Now Pro Cross racing bikes cost as much as pro road racing bikes ..

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd say the Bianchi Volpe or Surly Cross-check make great commuters, if you can find them.

  11. #11
    nashcommguy
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    nashville, tn
    My Bikes
    Commuters: Fuji Delray road, Fuji Discovery mtb...Touring: Softride Traveler...Road: C-dale SR300
    Posts
    2,500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sci_femme View Post
    2008 Tricross Comp commuterized. CX is an ultimate machine for high-speed long-distance commute. Just make sure you have enough bosses to put all the bells and whistles. And brakes tend to be more sensitive to good adjustment.

    Have fun

    SF
    When I was looking for a bike to use for a 40 mi rt commute w/rolling hills(one 18% killer ) and 95% asphalt I ended up stumbling on a Motobecane Fantom CX from BD. It's a 2x9. I swapped out the 36t low for a 40t and the stock tires for some SMPs after about a month. Already had a rack, bags, lights, wb cages, toolbag, framepump, clipless, etc. So, all I had to do was set it up and ride. It was a winner from the first pedal stroke and is still going strong after 15,000 commuter/utility miles.

    Later this spring I'm changing out the chain, cassette, cables and brakepads. Adding full coverage fenders and new hb tape. Both hubs, bb and headset bearings...probably will replace them all.
    Last edited by nashcommguy; 03-02-11 at 09:24 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by himespau View Post
    ok, that may be true, I was just thinking that I'd read that the cf race cx bikes with the higher end components (and therefore more expensive) were less likely to have the eyelets, but you may have a different experience.
    read that again, didn't mean to flame you.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Champaign, Il
    My Bikes
    Litespeed and a Fantom Cross Commuter
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  14. #14
    Because I thought I could ks1g's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Wash DC Metro
    My Bikes
    November, Trek OCLV, Bianchi Castro Valley commuter
    Posts
    969
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A cross bike can be a wonderful commuter. I built up a Bianchi Castro Valley frame (basically Volpe geometry with frame set up for 1x9 drivetrain) as my year-round commuter. While heavier than my carbon fiber road bike, it's lighter than a hybrid or the CV has all the fittings for: full coverage fenders, rack, plenty of space for lights, the canti brakes and wider forks give clearance for anything from 23mm road slicks (summer) to 32mm or wider road (my default set) to 35mm studded (depths of winter). It would take wider tires if I removed the fenders. Modern cantis can provide plenty of stopping power and work with drop-bar brifters. Front fork has rack brazeons, so I could do reasonably full touring on it if I wanted to.

    There are some "performance/flat bar" hybrids that I think work well, too. My son has an older Jamis Coda that I liked as a commuter when I "borrowed" it, performed fine for a self-supported C&O Canal towpath tour when he was in Boy Scouts, and is now his college bike. It takes much wider tires than my cross bike, which might be important if you live someplace with lots of snow (although based on his photos, epon's Fantom Cross seems to have no issues in that department).

    Limitations are few. I get some toe overlap on the front wheel, only an issue at very slow speeds, exacerbated by the fender. Chainstays are shorter than on touring bikes, so potential for shoe heels wacking panniers. I mounted my rack as far aft as I could and have not had a problem.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,645
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here in bike country there are a few large institutions (OHSU and PSU to name two) that have large bike parking facilities where a person can spend a minute or ten oogling a vast array of two wheeled iron (steel, aluminum, various alloys, etc.). I see quite a few Redline cross bikes built up into commuters. FWIW.

    H

  16. #16
    not a role model JeffS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    4,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I went through a lot of buying and selling ebay bikes early on. One of those bikes was a Bad Boy that had been built up with higher end parts. It was undoubtedly the worst bike I have ever had the misfortune of trying to commute on. I'm not sure why, but it felt slow and dead.

    I knew I was selling it after the first ride, but rode it once more just to confirm. That was also the last flat bar bike I've tried riding on the road.

    For reference, I also have a Cannondale Cyclocross (for racing only) and it's nothing like the Bad Boy - even remotely. If you want a cross bike, buy one - though I think there are more commuter-appropriate bikes than the Cannondale.

  17. #17
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Windy City
    My Bikes
    Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Origin8 monstercross, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2
    Posts
    9,463
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another vote for a cross bike. My Soma Double Cross has 8000 miles of commuting, fitness riding and century events. Next fall I'll add another cyclocross bike to the quiver and convert the Double Cross to winter duty with studded tires, disc brakes and a Dyno hub for lighting. A cyclocross bike can be built light for faster road usage and can be easily converted to dirt road use. The bike can also support untra-light touring and winter bike usage.

  18. #18
    Senior Member JAG410's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Moorhead, MN
    My Bikes
    A few ;)
    Posts
    919
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Cross Check commuter, road rider, gravel grinder, century cranker-outer, and overall joy to ride.


  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build
    Posts
    4,568
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JAG410 View Post
    My Cross Check commuter, road rider, gravel grinder, century cranker-outer, and overall joy to ride.

    I use something similar to this for commuting. It's very nearly perfect.


    Cross bikes make great commuters if they have:
    1. Good enough clearance (if you want to run studs make sure it can handle more than a 34c tire)
    2. Mounting points for fenders and a rack.

    Touring bikes also work great. If you want a snappier ride go with a cross bike, if you want something more stable and better able to handle truly large loads go with a touring bike. Most commuters I've met don't load up more than 25lbs of stuff, so a touring bike is not necessary.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    My Bikes
    '96 Trek 800, '10 Specialized Steel Allez
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A tad disappointing. I've been looking towards making the Caadx Tiagra as my new all-round general purpose bike (never ridden one though, lbs didn't have my size) Honestly, I just think it looks really nice, very low key yet fierce. I was looking for something rough-and-tumble like a cross bike, but fast enough to zip out on the roads with. So question: As far as cross bikes are concerned, are commuter-appropriate and race-inspired-fast mutually exclusive?

  21. #21
    Senior Member canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Palisade, CO
    My Bikes
    Singular Gryphon fully rigid 29er multi-use. Nuvinci N360 IGH
    Posts
    4,236
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Phyoomz View Post
    So question: As far as cross bikes are concerned, are commuter-appropriate and race-inspired-fast mutually exclusive?
    Not necessarily.
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._pro_ti_xi.htm
    Last edited by canyoneagle; 04-04-11 at 12:11 PM.
    Currently one bike: Singular Gryphon do-it all bike with Nuvinci N360
    Coming soon (winter project) Ciocc Designer '84 mod build
    Temporary (on loan from a buddy): 1985 Raleigh Prestige

  22. #22
    not a role model JeffS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    4,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by canyoneagle View Post

    I don't get it. It's a cross bike, not unlike most other cross bikes on the planet.

    I have to think that one of the bikes with fender eyelets and/or rack mounts would have to be considered more "commuter appropriate" by most.

    The the OP... there's nothing magic about a cross bike. For most people riding on the road, a "sport touring" road bike would be a better choice. They don't have the appeal though, as people seem attracted to race equipment.

  23. #23
    Senior Member canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Palisade, CO
    My Bikes
    Singular Gryphon fully rigid 29er multi-use. Nuvinci N360 IGH
    Posts
    4,236
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffS View Post
    I don't get it. It's a cross bike, not unlike most other cross bikes on the planet.

    I have to think that one of the bikes with fender eyelets and/or rack mounts would have to be considered more "commuter appropriate" by most.

    The the OP... there's nothing magic about a cross bike. For most people riding on the road, a "sport touring" road bike would be a better choice. They don't have the appeal though, as people seem attracted to race equipment.
    I was responding to the question. The link I provided is a cx racing bike cross bike that also has eyelets. I thought it was a pretty straightforward, so my apologies for any confusion.
    Currently one bike: Singular Gryphon do-it all bike with Nuvinci N360
    Coming soon (winter project) Ciocc Designer '84 mod build
    Temporary (on loan from a buddy): 1985 Raleigh Prestige

  24. #24
    Senior Member tarwheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    My Bikes
    Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL
    Posts
    6,479
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    If you don't actually plan to cyclocross race, check out the new Salsa Casseroll. Like a cross-bike, it has canti brakes and clearance for larger tires, but it is designed for commuting and light touring. It has mounts for fenders and racks, front and rear, and includes a front rack. Very reasonably priced.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  25. #25
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    My Bikes
    Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    30,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I really like that Casseroll. If I had to be limited to one bike, I think that's the do-it-all frameset.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •