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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 03-10-11, 02:32 AM   #1
Sirrus Rider
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Mixed tire sizes on the same bike

Anyone running mixed tire sizes on the same bike? I'm currently having a fender rubbing issue on my hybridized Alpine MTB. I just replaced my 26 X 1.5 tires with 26 X 1.85 Michelin Citys. I love the plush ride; however, these new Michelin fill the front fender with only a hair's worth of clearance to spare at the front of the fender and I can hear the fender make contact when under load. These tires are only available in 26 X 1.85 and 26 X 1.4 and I'm wondering if I went to the smaller size on the front if I would have any handling issues. I suppose I could also notch the fender for more fork leg clearance, but I don't want to compromise the strength of the fender.
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Old 03-10-11, 03:16 AM   #2
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Sheldon brown has an article on tire sizing and has a section on mixed tire widths at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html . Basically it'll work fine but if smooth ride is the goal large in front/small in back is more ideal.
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Old 03-10-11, 06:41 AM   #3
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I've run smaller (narrower) tires on the front of my road bikes several times with no affect on handling. Most of your weight is over the rear wheel, so it's actually a benefit having a larger tire in back. You can also run lower air pressures in the front (and should) for the same reasons, and your bike will ride much more comfortably.
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Old 03-10-11, 12:21 PM   #4
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I've run smaller (narrower) tires on the front of my road bikes several times with no affect on handling. Most of your weight is over the rear wheel, so it's actually a benefit having a larger tire in back. You can also run lower air pressures in the front (and should) for the same reasons, and your bike will ride much more comfortably.
+1

Sheldon Brown notwithstanding.
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Old 03-10-11, 03:31 PM   #5
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I've ran set ups like this. Really makes sense if you are carrying a load on the rear as the wider tire in the back will transfer less shock to the rims and make it last longer.

I've had 26 x 1.25 up front and 26 x 2.0 in the back. It works out great because I got quicker handling up front where I didn't have any load and I got a plusher more shock absorbing rear end.

sometimes it is better to use a front tire with better grip for better handling.
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Old 03-10-11, 03:41 PM   #6
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While not a "commuter" bike, I've got a mid '80s Concorede that I'm running the Continental Attack/Force combo. Attack is on the front and is 700x22 & the Force is the rear @ 700x24.

Not much difference, but they are different size tires... It's the only bike I'm running different sizes on (out of a half dozen or so).
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Old 03-10-11, 08:00 PM   #7
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Solved my own problem. The light bracket had slipped down and was putting pressure on the fender. Once I pushed the bracket back up and tightened it back into place, the fender popped up.
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Old 03-10-11, 10:37 PM   #8
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28C front, 32C rear.
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Old 03-11-11, 10:48 AM   #9
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28C front, 32C rear.
Me too.

It's a bicycle, not precision medical equipment.
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Old 03-11-11, 11:58 AM   #10
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I'm frugal, so I want to get the most bang for my $. The cost of the Michelin City is the same, regardless of size. But the 32C has a lot more rubber, which will translate to longer wear. 28C is good for at least 9K miles at the front. 32C can reach 8K miles without jack-rabbit starts.

BTW, there's a JensenUSA promo @ General Cycling Discussion. Buy $25 JensenUSA gift card, get $50 credit to purchase stuffs at JensenUSA. JensenUSA will pricematch. Now is a good time to check out the Michelin City at 1/2 price...$13 per tire. Less if you find another online retailer with a lower price. 700 x 28, 32, 40, and 47.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...1#post12346060

http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...trip+Tire.aspx
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Old 03-11-11, 04:45 PM   #11
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lest you fret about a few measly mm, I had a 28mm tire in back, and a 50mm Big Apple in front. Only problem I encountered was all of a sudden I had a slopping top tube.
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Old 03-11-11, 05:54 PM   #12
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Hell my wifes bike has a 27x1 1/8 on the back (about to be a 700x23) and a 24x 1 on the front! LOL

Quit over thinking it.

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