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  1. #1
    Senior Member rockhoppernc's Avatar
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    Any ideas on how to keep my weight of my handlebars?

    Any ideas on how to keep my weight of my handlebars?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Boozerguyzer's Avatar
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    Raise your seat if it isn't already high enough that your leg is almost fully extended by the bottom of the stroke, move your seat back, raise your handle bars, buy a larger frame (or if size isn't the issue which it almost always is, a frame with more relaxed geometry)
    Put no stock in the tick of the clock - from the bottlecap of a Magic Hat #9

  3. #3
    Bike addict, dreamer AdamDZ's Avatar
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    Is your bike the right size and type for you?

  4. #4
    Randomhead
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    move your saddle back

  5. #5
    AEO
    AEO is online now
    Senior Member AEO's Avatar
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    ride handless.

    actually, move your saddle back.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  6. #6
    Senior Member Stubby's Avatar
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    The way to get weight off the handlebars is to get yourself in a more upright seating position. Many of the more aggressive geometry bikes, and that includes most bikes sold in the USA, have a relatively steep seat tube angle. That will push the rider forward. It does put the rider in a more aerodynamic position but there's a price to pay for that, and one of them is more weight placed on the hands.

    Getting weight off the handlebars is a two prong approach. First is moving the seat farther back. You can also get seat steams that are more angled back if you can't get enough with the seat alone. This will effectively place you farther back from the crank so you won't be thrown into the handlebars (or at least as much). Next you have to be able to comfortable reach the handlebars without leaning to far forward. That could mean a new handlebar with more sweep back. There are lots of choices on the market and the switch is easy. Hopefully you won't have to lengthen the cables which can complicate things but it shouldn't be a deal breaker.
    Last edited by Stubby; 06-10-11 at 12:14 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member chrisb71's Avatar
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    My girlfriend rode for weeks on this arm barely complaining. So if your arm doesn't look like this, you need to toughen up.

    IMG_20110607_140157.jpg

    (It broke in August of 2010, she was told it was healed by a doc who probably didn't look very hard, which is why she was riding thinking it was healed but just hurting. Needless to say we found a new doc and she's scheduled for surgery in a week.)

  8. #8
    Senior Member cod.peace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockhoppernc View Post
    Any ideas on how to keep my weight of my handlebars?
    There's always this option.
    old steel Specialized Hardrock

  9. #9
    Bike addict, dreamer AdamDZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cod.peace View Post
    There's always this option.
    A 'bent?!?

  10. #10
    The Fat Guy In The Back Tundra_Man's Avatar
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    Stand up when you pedal.


    Sorry... couldn't resist.
    '81 Panasonic Sport, '02 Giant Boulder SE, '08 Felt S32, '10 Diamondback Insight RS, '10 Windsor Clockwork

    Visit me at the Tundra Man Workshop

  11. #11
    Senior Member canyoneagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cod.peace View Post
    There's always this option.
    fork's 'bent
    Currently one bike: Singular Gryphon do-it all bike with Nuvinci N360
    Coming soon (winter project) Ciocc Designer '84 mod build
    Temporary (on loan from a buddy): 1985 Raleigh Prestige

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    As a technique to get more setback, 1 way, the use of a Brompton Saddle adapter pin,
    attaches to the top of a plain seat post, then the saddle clip rotated above the pin,
    attaches to the SAP, it is a rear facing horizontal tube, when fitted.

    Or, a crank forward bike they put the seat tube well behind the BB,
    for flat footed stops.

    Or, a 'dutch bike' with a mid 60 degree seat tube angle

  13. #13
    Senior Member Stubby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    As a technique to get more setback, 1 way, the use of a Brompton Saddle adapter pin,
    attaches to the top of a plain seat post, then the saddle clip rotated above the pin,
    attaches to the SAP, it is a rear facing horizontal tube, when fitted.

    Or, a crank forward bike they put the seat tube well behind the BB,
    for flat footed stops.

    Or, a 'dutch bike' with a mid 60 degree seat tube angle
    I've never ridden a crank forward bike so can't say to much about them. They look like a type of semi recumbent cruiser. I would guess they would be terrible on hills. Its like going from one extreme to another. The Dutch style bikes with a relaxed 67 degree angles or there about would be a better solution. How much anyone needs to lay it back to get comfortable is individual. It likely also changes with age.

    I had a recumbent I sold about 5 years ago after over 4 years of use. I never could get used to the way it handled hills, especially with any kind of load. That may have more to do with the Bike E (now out of business) then recumbents in general. I haven't ridden enough other styles to know. But on top of that it was just not convenient for tooling around in an urban area.

    It doesn't surprise me that the issue of pressure of the hands and wrist comes up for discussion quite often. Nearly all bikes sold in the USA are designed for sporty type riding with aggressive angles that throw the rider forward. Add to that the either drop or straight type handlebars and you have a recipe for pain. Contrast that to the European style everyday type bikes with more relaxed angles and swept back handlebars designed for more upright riding. These type bikes take pressure off the upper body. You lose some efficiency but gain comfort. What you get depends on what's important to you. As the years go by comfort has become much more important than gaining a few mph. Being on a bike does not mean having to be uncomfortable. There is no need to suffer.
    Last edited by Stubby; 06-10-11 at 03:22 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member SouthFLpix's Avatar
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    Raise the handlebars or tilt the nose of your saddle slightly up.

  15. #15
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    keep elbows bent?....i don't know if this will help but it's something i try to do and it helps me.

  16. #16
    already soaked perspiration's Avatar
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    Just throwing my vote in for MOVE YOUR SEAT BACK
    you can also pedal harder, this takes weight off your butt and hands
    If it's peace you find in dying, and if dying time is near,
    Just bundle up my coffin 'cause it's cold way down there!

  17. #17
    Senior Member gear's Avatar
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    Pilates, it will strengthen your core muscles so they can lift more of your upper body's weight rather than resting all of it on your hands.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    My vote for moving the seat back. I have also replaced my sem with a slightly longer 30 degree angle one, and it helped tremendously.
    "There are many causes worth dying for. There are none worth killing for." Albert Camus

  19. #19
    The Professor akohekohe's Avatar
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    The way to keep the weight of your handle bars is to not cut them or abrade them.
    The more you drive the less intelligent you are. - Tracy Walter as Miller in Repo Man.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by akohekohe View Post
    The way to keep the weight of your handle bars is to not cut them or abrade them.
    Hehe

  21. #21
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    The less weight you have on your hands, the more weight is on your butt.

    When I ride my wife's Townie, my hands aren't carrying much weight at all. But, I end up wishing for a sprung seatpost or saddle because the existing super-plush, super-wide saddle just doesn't seem to be enough.

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