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  1. #1
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    New to commuting, need a bit of advice?

    First off i am new to the idea of commuting for multiple reasons and Looking at getting a bike so i can get started but can't seem to make decisions based on current knowledge. I am looking to make a commute that is 14 miles roughly each way mainly street/bike trails with very little incline/decline. Looking for more of an upright sitting bike but on a budget. I have checked the craigslist/ebay stuff but it is all kinda of foreign to me still on what im looking for. My size is 6'3" 225 lbs so i know i am looking for a larger frame/wheel size. Any tips or brands to lean toward/away from? or maybe bike style? Thanks for any help or advice.

    Thanks,

    Brad

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    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    A "hybrid" style bike may be best suited for you.
    What is your budget?
    For someone in your situation that feels "it's all
    foreign"; I highly recommend you go to a local
    bike shop. They'll help you you get a bike that
    fits right and usually will warranty their bike for
    a year. Good luck.

  3. #3
    King of Typos rickyhmltn's Avatar
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    I'm 6'. 235 and just bought my first "real" bike today
    I bought a 2012 Trek 7.1 it doesn't have suspension but doesn't need it for the highway from what I gather. It was $399 + tax, a total of $426. I also purchased a Rack for it.

    What exactly is your budget? Trust me I went through this very same thing.

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    Bugdet I am trying to stay around was nothing over $500, that's why i had been looking at used/older bikes. Cheaper is always better especially in the economy and not knowing for sure if ill enjoy this like i am thinking i will. Any good sources that are not sketchy for used bikes? Is the trek 7.1 what kinda style is that?

  5. #5
    Senior Member silmarillion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgruber1985 View Post
    Bugdet I am trying to stay around was nothing over $500, that's why i had been looking at used/older bikes. Cheaper is always better especially in the economy and not knowing for sure if ill enjoy this like i am thinking i will. Any good sources that are not sketchy for used bikes? Is the trek 7.1 what kinda style is that?
    Exactly why you should take your time and research all the variables for your ride. You should be able to get a good bike for what you want it for for that or maybe even less if you look around.

    It's important to understand the components and what the bike is set up for just in case you decide to start upgrading. I agree, maybe a hybrid bike would be suited for your commute. A 28 mile round trip commute is a pretty good one.

    Another thing you may want to do would be to borrow someones bike (if you have that option...) make sure that it's set up correctly so you can enjoy the ride and go for it. Ride for a couple of days or perhaps even a week or so, just to see what you think. At least you'll have a better feel for what you are going to want in a bike should you decide to buy your own. I would be willing to bet you could probably rent a pretty good bike there in Huntington Beach somewhere.

    Just one more thing, try to remember it does take a little getting used to when you start riding more routinely. Stick with it. Before you know it, you'll begin to feel better, look better and hopefully grow to enjoy cycling for more than just your commute. Not to mention the $$$ you'll save by riding that distance instead of pouring it into your gas tank.

    Good Luck!
    "Whenever you think you have something dummy-proof, someone builds a better idiot." - Wisdom overheard on the BF

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    Hey there Bgruber1985!

    My advice to you, with your current budget would be one of two options:

    1) Look for a chromoly steel-framed road bike on CL and gradually upgrade your components

    - OR -

    2) Order a bike online through Bikesdirect.com.

    This is the bike that I would suggest for you, if 61cm is your size:

    www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/mirage_xi_steel.htm
    The Motobecane Mirage Road Bike ~ $300



    * Chromoly steel is a very tough and durable type of steel. It's has a longer fatigue life than aluminum and will give you decades of service, if kept dry. It's ride quality is absolutely incomparable. The extraordinarily good thing about chromoly steel, is that when your components wear out, you can rest assured that your frame will be in the same condition after your replacement components have worn out, as well. Steel lasts for decades! Nobody can say that truthfully, about any other frame material, other than titanium.

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 11-03-11 at 12:23 AM.

  7. #7
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    Sure you want upright with 14 miles each way? How much time do you have to go that distance? Not sayin upright is necessarily slow but...

    Id start out by hitting up your LBS and riding a few bikes to see what you like. They will usually have a range of bike styles and prices to give you a good idea of what your looking at. You can always take that and go find a used bike if they don't have something for you there.

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    For 28 miles each way I'd definitely look at a road bike. Find one with mounts for fenders and a rear rack.

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    prefer an upright. I am not going to be in the biggest hurry to get to work so speed is not really a factor. The commute on the way to my destination is primarily bike trails being smoother terrain and minimal traffic, on the way home i plan to take streets because its going to be around 2 am so traffic will be minimal and wont have to deal with the homeless etc.. in the river trails.If speed is a factor getting there, i can always hope on a bus. I have ridden a few road bikes in the past and did not really enjoy the hunched over feel with the drop down handle bars, and the skinny road tires always seemed sketchy to me. BUt than again that is why i joined here is to get get info and opinions. Instead of an up right, what else would be a good choice to look at or would swapping out handlebars or forks etc on another type be more suited for a budget?? I have seen a few used bikes locally for cheap that i have thought about starting with to get a feel, one being a Gary fisher mako 2007 and another being a diamondback sorrento i believe it was and don't remember the year. I know they are older, but at least would get a foot in the door so to speak.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lot's Knife's Avatar
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    You're on the right track. Americans are obsessed with road bikes; you don't have to be. Make sure your lighting will last 90 minutes or so for your distance. I'd run 'em day and night. Charge your NIMH batteries while at work. Tactical flashlight in front, Radbot or PB Superflash in back. Think about a Kona Africa or KHS Green, maybe a Torker T-300, zip-tie a dairy crate to the rack, get some tire liners, a mirror and some pepper spray and you're good to go. New chain every six months or so. $500 max.
    Last edited by Lot's Knife; 11-03-11 at 04:54 AM.
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    I think the advice to look for chromoly steel only is a bit dubious. We have been riding Aluminium-framed, mass production bikes for several decades now and they work fine. There is nothing wrong with chromoly frames (I have 2) but I also ride an Aluminium frame.
    Since you are a big rider , 6'3", 225 lbs, you need a BIG FRAME. The largest "size" available is usually 23" but the exact fit of a 23" frame really depends on the length of the horizontal top tube (TT) rather than its standover height.
    Trek FX (25" size) quote a TT length =60.3cm
    Cannondale Quick (jumbo 23") quote TT length = 62cm.

    The Trek "size" is larger but the Cannondale frame is longer so would fit a big rider better. When you go to view a bike, take a tape measure and find out the horizontal length from (centre of) seat-tube to head-tube.

    I always like to recommend Cannondale for larger riders, they make some of the largest production frames and the style of their frames is very stiff. Larger frames always suffer from lack of stiffness compared to smaller versions of the same frame so extra stiffness is always welcome. I would never recommend Cannondale for small riders, they are much stiffer than required so not as comfortable.

    The hybrid/fitness style of frame is good for general purpose commuting. They come with threaded eyelets for fitting a rear luggage rack and bolt-on fenders. Cannondale also do a very nice touring bike in XXL size that comes highly recommended for longer distances.
    Big riders need strong wheels. You can upgrade the wheels but I would look for a conventional 36-spoke design rather than 32 or fewer spokes.
    For long commutes, a larger wheel (700c size) found on road/hybrid/touring bikes will roll more easily than the smaller MTB (26") wheel found on so-called "comfort bikes".
    The other dimension that is useful for big riders is crank size. Look for a bike with cranks that are 175mm long rather than the medium sized 170mm. You dont find any longer cranks on production bikes. Long legs can pedal more efficiently on long cranks.

  12. #12
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    Why do you want upright position? Have you ridden it long distance vs. drop bars? I find upright uncomfortable for anything over about 10 miles and very limiting. I do not like the way aluminum bikes typically handle - the tubes are typically too oversized and it leads to a very harsh ride.

    The best thing, IMO, at your price point is to go after an 80s Japanese touring or sports touring steel bike...even a more relaxed racing bike would likely be ok. You should be able to get a very high quality model at $400ish if patient. The older Miyata 912s and 914s with rack mounts would be great...the Lotus Odyssey and Eclaire would be a good choice, Miyata 610s are likely appropriate, several Fuji models, the Centurion Full Pro and Semi-Pros. Some of the Treks are also good choices here. There are so many models that it's impossible to be comprehensive.

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    Here's my recommendation, as someone who has been gradually switching from bus commuting to bike commuting for a year now.

    Don't spend more than $250 on a bike; ideally, don't spend even that much. Save the rest of your budget for fixing up the bike and buying a second bike. It's very difficult to research bikes well unless you've been riding awhile.

    Upright is fine; I prefer it.

    Here's the basic accessories you'll need:
    Good helmet--$50
    Pump, patch kit, levers--$50
    Multi-tool--$15
    Lock--$35
    Lights--at least $60 (for this Romisen from Shining Beam, with accessories, which is what I use, plus a rear blinky.

    Things that you saved a couple hundred so you could improve after a month of riding.
    Seat.
    Handlebars/stem set-up.
    Tires.
    Shifters.

    If you have a reliable local shop, I'd get something like this Lotus, and spend another $250 right up front on tires, cables, and a new stem/bar/control setup--and save the old bars and controls so you can easily switch back.

    This bike in your general area is very like my well-liked commuter which was stolen last week.
    Last edited by SamChevre; 11-03-11 at 07:46 AM.
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  14. #14
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamChevre View Post
    Here's my recommendation, as someone who has been gradually switching from bus commuting to bike commuting for a year now.

    Don't spend more than $250 on a bike; ideally, don't spend even that much. Save the rest of your budget for fixing up the bike and buying a second bike. It's very difficult to research bikes well unless you've been riding awhile.

    Upright is fine; I prefer it.

    Here's the basic accessories you'll need:
    Good helmet--$50
    Pump, patch kit, levers--$50
    Multi-tool--$15
    Lock--$35
    Lights--at least $60 (for this Romisen from Shining Beam, with accessories, which is what I use, plus a rear blinky.

    Things that you saved a couple hundred so you could improve after a month of riding.
    Seat.
    Handlebars/stem set-up.
    Tires.
    Shifters.

    If you have a reliable local shop, I'd get something like this Lotus, and spend another $250 right up front on tires, cables, and a new stem/bar/control setup--and save the old bars and controls so you can easily switch back.

    This bike in your general area is very like my well-liked commuter which was stolen last week.
    If I didn't have bikes already, and had time to be patient, I'd agree more on price...but if you don't have that luxury, I'd just go on Craigslist and be willing to spend a little more to get me going. You'll find that you save so much money that it's justified. The Lotus linked above is a high end model and likely a good bike. It might be a little limiting on tire clearance...the Legend was more a racing model. I think I see rack mounyts, which i;d want as an every day bike.

    I also agree with the above poster on more than one bike. If you're really going to commute every day, it helps to have a back up bike...I also like having a dedicated winter beater. That's something to worry about another day, and you can be more cheap/picky on the second since you won't need it.

    The advice on saving money for upgrades to tires and saddles is right on...and those things matter as much, or more, than the bike and parts you're using. Good tires and a comfy saddle make a WORLD of difference. The truth is that no matter what advice we give, you're largely going to have to figure out what works for you by making mistakes and with experience. In a lot of ways it makes sense to start cheap to figure out what you want. The nice thing about buying used Japanese steel is that you'll get what you paid back out of it when it's time to change.

  15. #15
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    Hi there Bgruber1985!

    You've gotten a lot of mixed advice here. Most of it is well-intended and warm hearted. However, let's just stick to the facts. The fact remains, that you're on a tight budget. Therefore, I'm most certain that you'd prefer to get the most bang for your buck.
    Aluminum frames are fine if purchased new. However, they do have limited stress thresholds. That means, that they all have a finite service life. The longer you use them, the closer you bring them to their point of failure. This stress comes from road vibration, the act of pedaling, and the force the frame is subjected to by placing weight upon the bicycle. Weight upon the bicycle, includes the weight of both the rider and any cargo. Larger, more massive people, subject aluminum frames to greater stress. You're a big guy, Bgruber1985! When you combine all of the stress factors together, that translates into a shorter fatigue life.

    Check these sites before you make a purchase decision:

    http://talu.com/materials.php

    www.brightspoke.com/c/understanding/bike-frame-materials.html

    http://tetcycles.com/bikes/frame-materials/

    Now, more facts. Flat or near flat hybrid styled handlebars are fine for short distances. What people consider as short distances may widely vary. However, the fact remains that drop handlebars, offer you more hand positions. You can ride in a more aerodynamic style by leaning forward and latching your hands onto the lower hooks, while lowering your head and pedaling faster for optimized speed. Alternatively, you can ride in a more relaxed manner, by holding on to the hoods of the handlebar, sitting more upright in a more relaxed riding postion. There are other hand placements, but the ones already mentioned demonstrate the most range in variation.

    If you are able to obtain the Motobecane Mirage I've already suggested, that IMHO would be your best bet. If you for some reason cannot obtain the Mirage, then CL would be your next most viable option. Look for bicycle frames made of chromoly-steel. The frames must be in excellent condition minus paint considerations, with no rust (or very minor surface rust). Make certain that the bike feels comfortable first, then close the deal with payment. I personally own four bicycles, one is a Trek 7.5FX. It has an aluminum frame. It doesn't ride as well as any of my steel-framed bikes. My best riding bikes for long distances are my steel-framed road bikes.

    Aluminum can be a good material too, provided that you know something about its history. Older aluminum frames tend to fail faster than newer ones. We don't make statements like that about steel frames, because that statement is false, as long as that frame has been properly cared for, by keeping it dry.

    IMHO, the shorter the ride, and the smoother the road, the more aluminum should be considered as an option.

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 11-03-11 at 08:10 AM.

  16. #16
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    Quick question on aluminum and fatigue life...

    I know that's absolutely true...aluminum will, at some point, fail with usage. CF also has a fatigue life as I recall. I know the air force learned that the hard way when planes with aluminum wings kept failing. My question is - is it a theoretical problem because the frames are over engineered and the point at which they fail long after we're dead? In other words - how many aluminum frames truly are failing due to fatigue life? How long does it take? My gut reaction is that, while they will fail, the point it happens is so far down the road as to be irrelevant in the real world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
    Quick question on aluminum and fatigue life...

    I know that's absolutely true...aluminum will, at some point, fail with usage. CF also has a fatigue life as I recall. I know the air force learned that the hard way when planes with aluminum wings kept failing. My question is - is it a theoretical problem because the frames are over engineered and the point at which they fail long after we're dead? In other words - how many aluminum frames truly are failing due to fatigue life? How long does it take? My gut reaction is that, while they will fail, the point it happens is so far down the road as to be irrelevant in the real world.
    Hi there KAS!

    That's a fair question. The answer is usage dependent. The more the aluminum frame is ridden and the harder it's ridden, the closer it approaches its fail point. The aluminum frame is also subjected to the rider's weight. That too contributes to a shortened fatigue life. However, that's not the only negative factor about aluminum that should be considered. Aluminum has a very low yield strength or yield capacity. That means that in an accident, aluminum will prefer to break or snap, as opposed to bend or flex. It therefore, is not too impact-resistant. Also, while aluminum will suffer dents, fractures, and gouges, steel will only suffer nicks and scratches, upon most minor to medium impacts.

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 11-03-11 at 08:41 AM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member canyoneagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Hey there Bgruber1985!

    My advice to you, with your current budget would be one of two options:

    1) Look for a chromoly steel-framed road bike on CL and gradually upgrade your components

    - OR -

    2) Order a bike online through Bikesdirect.com.

    This is the bike that I would suggest for you, if 61cm is your size:

    www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/mirage_xi_steel.htm
    The Motobecane Mirage Road Bike ~ $300



    * Chromoly steel is a very tough and durable type of steel. It's has a longer fatigue life than aluminum and will give you decades of service, if kept dry. It's ride quality is absolutely incomparable. The extraordinarily good thing about chromoly steel, is that when your components wear out, you can rest assured that your frame will be in the same condition after your replacement components have worn out, as well. Steel lasts for decades! Nobody can say that truthfully, about any other frame material, other than titanium.

    - Slim

    The Mirage is a great bang-for the buck option IF you are somewhat familiar and comfortable on bicycles in general. The DT shifters are supremely simple (less maintenance an cost than brifters) but may not suit you if you have balance issues on a bicycle.

    Also, I'd go with wider, more comfortable 32mm tires (such as Panaracer Pasela TG) - the 25's that come on the bike would likely be too skinny for your size and intended use. Eyeballing the detailed photos, it looks like there is plenty of room for 32's on that frame.

    On to other topics....
    While I generally agree with others here that a pure flat bar bicycle is somewhat limited for commutes longer than 7 or 8 miles, bear in mind that any flat bar can easily be swapped for a much more versatile bar that would be compatible with the flat bar controls. Examples include "trekking" bars, bar-ends, or ergonomic mountain bike bars (Titec Jones, On One Mary, etc). Just know that you are not limited to two choices (flat bar or drop bar).
    In a similar vein, there are options for conventional "drop bar" designs if you find them unsuited for your preferences. Options include "mustache bars", "compact drops" or "dirt drops". All of these provide less of a drop and more of a lateral flare.

    The best advice I can offer is to go to several shops and test ride different styles and models to see what suits you. Try to find a shop that specializes in "transportation" cycling rather than racing - they will have a more balanced approach to finding a good style for you.
    You don't have to buy a bicycle from a shop just because you test ride some bikes and want to learn more. You are not obligated. I personally try to throw at least some business to shops that help me out (buying parts, tubes, food, etc) to keep my service karma in tact, but that's just me.

    Take your time if you can. Rushing into decisions typically ends in compromise and higher cost in the end.
    Good luck!
    Last edited by canyoneagle; 11-03-11 at 08:46 AM.
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  19. #19
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    Slim - I don't have any aluminum frames, I'm not trying to play devil's advocate and I far prefer steel. I also agree about aluminum shattering vs. steel bending. The main issue for me is more about tubing diameter...I find most aluminum frames so oversized as to be VERY harsh.

    I understand that the usage and rider will affect the fatigue life - and I'm sure not all aluminum frames are equal. A Kona might be more or less over built than a Cannondale. I'm still wondering if it's a relevant consideration though - I haven't heard of too many frames just snapping based on fatigue. Obviously wide spread aluminum use is fairly recent - early 80s on - so there is a limited sampling pool. That being said - I still see a LOT of 80s used Cannondales around and I haven't heard of frame snapping stories. Cannondale's life time warranty indicates that they thought it would be around long enough not to worry about fatigue life.

    Ultimately, if aluminum frames were actually snapping due to fatigue, i think there would be more warnings and more data on actual incidents.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Dean7's Avatar
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    You could go with something like this:

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...scid=0&scname=

    I owned one for a while and it was a fine ride. I never liked the feeling of having a front shock but my commute is also only 4.1 miles of smooth road each way so it might come in handy for you.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
    Slim - I don't have any aluminum frames, I'm not trying to play devil's advocate and I far prefer steel. I also agree about aluminum shattering vs. steel bending. The main issue for me is more about tubing diameter...I find most aluminum frames so oversized as to be VERY harsh.

    I understand that the usage and rider will affect the fatigue life - and I'm sure not all aluminum frames are equal. A Kona might be more or less over built than a Cannondale. I'm still wondering if it's a relevant consideration though - I haven't heard of too many frames just snapping based on fatigue. Obviously wide spread aluminum use is fairly recent - early 80s on - so there is a limited sampling pool. That being said - I still see a LOT of 80s used Cannondales around and I haven't heard of frame snapping stories. Cannondale's life time warranty indicates that they thought it would be around long enough not to worry about fatigue life.

    Ultimately, if aluminum frames were actually snapping due to fatigue, i think there would be more warnings and more data on actual incidents.
    Hey there KAS!

    You hit the nail on the head when you mentioned "sampling pool". There are quite literally no statistics available. However, if you were to talk to bicycle mechanics in LBS, they will tell you that they get so many aluminum frames that fail, and they get so many steel frames that fail. The primary reason that steel frames fail, is due to lack of proper care and issues related to oxidation. With aluminum, it seems it could be almost anything.

    We need to have some type of mandatory recording of failed frames and the estimated reason for their failure. This information can then be distributed or disseminated to world cyclists, so that we may better make cycling decisions when it comes to purchase. However, I do get the feeling that the bicycle manufacturers already know more about frame statistics than we do. They're just keeping that info close to the vest!

    - Slim

    PS.

    I think that the government should step in and collect its own independent bicycle data.
    Last edited by SlimRider; 11-03-11 at 09:16 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
    Slim - The main issue for me is more about tubing diameter...I find most aluminum frames so oversized as to be VERY harsh.
    Are you riding the XXL size that the original poster is looking for. As I said, in the large size you want as much stiffness as you can get; in the small size, bikes are usually over-built and too stiff. If you ride small bikes, this complaint simply not relevant to the OP.

    All frames can crack, even steel or titanium. I wouldnt worry myself about it.

    I think we have lost the OP in a highly technical argument. He needs a bike to ride to work. Almost any big brand bike in aluminium or steel will do the job. For longer commutes you need a variety of comfortable handholds which you can achieve by using drop bars OR trekking style bars OR aerobars OR barends. For riding on rough shoulders, a wider tyre of about 32mm is about right. If the bike can do all of this, ride it.

  23. #23
    Senior Member canyoneagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    For riding on rough shoulders, a wider tyre of about 32mm is about right. If the bike can do all of this, ride it.
    32mm is my preferred road bike tire width, by far.
    However, I've been getting flat out spoiled rotten by the giant 60mm (2.35 inch) Schwalbe Big Apples on my son's 29er that is doing stand-in commuting duty as I patiently await my new frame. Those tires are FUN.
    In fact for a bigger guy, the 29er MTB with fat slicks is something to consider. I love it. I've found my commute time for my 15-16 mile (RT) flat urban commute are no different (real world conditions) than with my road bike. Plus, I don't have to stress about my line like I do on my road bike.

    Here's a pic of my temporary monster commuter - my son's bike with some of my components.
    I keep the fork locked out so there's no front squish. I actually pass roadies on this bike, and it really pisses them off


    Something to consider....
    Currently one bike: Singular Gryphon do-it all bike with Nuvinci N360
    Coming soon (winter project) Ciocc Designer '84 mod build
    Temporary (on loan from a buddy): 1985 Raleigh Prestige

  24. #24
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    Are you riding the XXL size that the original poster is looking for. As I said, in the large size you want as much stiffness as you can get; in the small size, bikes are usually over-built and too stiff. If you ride small bikes, this complaint simply not relevant to the OP.

    All frames can crack, even steel or titanium. I wouldnt worry myself about it.

    I think we have lost the OP in a highly technical argument. He needs a bike to ride to work. Almost any big brand bike in aluminium or steel will do the job. For longer commutes you need a variety of comfortable handholds which you can achieve by using drop bars OR trekking style bars OR aerobars OR barends. For riding on rough shoulders, a wider tyre of about 32mm is about right. If the bike can do all of this, ride it.
    Good point - I ride mid-size (54-56).

  25. #25
    Senior Member Slaninar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Hey there KAS!

    However, I do get the feeling that the bicycle manufacturers already know more about frame statistics than we do. They're just keeping that info close to the vest!
    When I bought a new bike from a Slovakian manufacturer (named "Kely's"), they gave a 3 year warranty on aluminium frames and a 5 year warranty on steel ones.

    To stay on topic: as a first bike I'd get a 50$ - 100$ second hand mountain bike, or a 29er with some gears and see what bothers me and what I like. Then I'd look for a bike that suits me, after several months of experience.

    You have to know if you like flat, or drop bars. If you like gears, or is one suitable gear enough. Do you like suspension, or not. Do you like fast slim tyres, or comfy fat ones. Are decent LED lights enough, or do you need a bike with a HUB dynamo and a very good headlight.

    In the mean time, you can find equipment that will suid you on any later bike: helmet (if you're not a real man like me ), clipless pedals and shoes, seat, LED lights etc.


    Start small, gather experience. And do get a fast Yamaha for hot summer days, nothing beats that!
    Last edited by Slaninar; 11-03-11 at 11:24 AM.
    Evviva il comunismo e la libertÓ.

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