Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: tire question

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Redding, CA.
    My Bikes
    Giant trance II MTB, Centurion Accordo
    Posts
    187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tire question

    Hello,
    Okay I have read on the forum to run slicks. I ride a MTB to work this fall I will be putting on new rubber. My thinking is if I ride Nobbies the Nobbies gives added protection with glass and sharp objects. Isn't slicks a lot thinner. I have Kevlar tires now. So is my thinking wrong. Thanks

  2. #2
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    CID
    My Bikes
    1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX
    Posts
    8,354
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That might be true, but slicks are so much nicer to ride on pavement that I'll take my chances. A big part of avoiding flats is to watch where you're going, and get off the saddle when you're going over bumps.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  3. #3
    All Bikes All The Time Sawtooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Boise, ID
    My Bikes
    Giant TCR 0, Lemond Zurich, Giant NRS 1, Jamis Explorer Beater/Commuter, Peugeot converted single speed
    Posts
    2,345
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting question....I don't think I get more flats with slicks than with knobbies, but I hardly ever run knobbies. Most of what flats my slicks would also certainly flat my knobbies (huge goat heads, cotter pins, nails, staples, etc).

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PNW - Victoria, BC
    My Bikes
    2002 Litespeed Vortex - 2007 Trek Madone 5.9 - 2004 Redline Conquest Pro - Specialized S-Works Festina Team Model - 93 Cannondale M 800 Beast of the East
    Posts
    1,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are also a lot of tires out there that are designed to minimize the potential for flats with thick, puncture resistant belts. Pretty much any major bicycle tire manufacturer makes a quality, extrememly puncture resistant commuting tire that is going to be a lot nicer to commute on as compared with a knobby.
    Guy K. Browne

    Schwalbe North America
    USA | CANADA | Central/South America
    1-888-700-5860 | 250-598-0397 ext.105
    www.schwalbetires.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,884
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Knobbies don't stop as well as slicks, on pavement, because they have less contact with the ground. That would be enough reason for me, but, honestly, if you try them out, you'll "feel" everything you need to know.

    Knobby tires are for dirt; slicks are for pavement.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Chesha Neko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kardar2 View Post
    Hello,
    Okay I have read on the forum to run slicks. I ride a MTB to work this fall I will be putting on new rubber. My thinking is if I ride Nobbies the Nobbies gives added protection with glass and sharp objects. Isn't slicks a lot thinner. I have Kevlar tires now. So is my thinking wrong. Thanks
    I would expect the opposite. I think knobbies and tread give glass and other stuff more opportunity to stick to the tire and cause a tear or puncture. A slick tire is IMO always the best bet on the road, and as others have said you can get smooth tires with anti-puncture belts.
    "I stick to my basic plan of simply keeping the pedals turning."
    -- Kent Peterson, The Way of the Mountain Turtle

  7. #7
    Senior Member Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PNW - Victoria, BC
    My Bikes
    2002 Litespeed Vortex - 2007 Trek Madone 5.9 - 2004 Redline Conquest Pro - Specialized S-Works Festina Team Model - 93 Cannondale M 800 Beast of the East
    Posts
    1,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Knobs do hold the vulnerable part of the tire (the casing) off the ground, so the theory is legitimate, but as Seattle Forrest pointed out, a knobby has very limited grip and adhesion on pavement so as a matter of safety, using a road tire on pavement will provide a better experience and safer travel than a knobby will.
    Guy K. Browne

    Schwalbe North America
    USA | CANADA | Central/South America
    1-888-700-5860 | 250-598-0397 ext.105
    www.schwalbetires.com

  8. #8
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    Two wheeled ones
    Posts
    12,324
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Knobbies also are more prone to collecting debris, which can work its way through the tire. I get fewer flats with slicks...and the performance issues have been discussed.

  9. #9
    kamikaze college commuter
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bike capital (of the United States, at least)
    My Bikes
    Free spirit FS21 (dead) + Specialized Rockhopper
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rode over a thumbtack on the weekend. Lodged all the way in...the knobbly part of the knobbly tire. Just missed the tube.

    Also, on a related note, is it considered bad to run a bigger tube on a narrower tire? I've got a 1.5-2" tube and am thinking about getting a 1.25" tire.
    Bikes owned:
    Free Spirit FS21 - the dead one in need of some lovin'
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper - the day-to-day monster
    -(secret)- the one I aspire to.
    1989 Peugeot Ocean Express - "found" bike

  10. #10
    Senior Member Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    PNW - Victoria, BC
    My Bikes
    2002 Litespeed Vortex - 2007 Trek Madone 5.9 - 2004 Redline Conquest Pro - Specialized S-Works Festina Team Model - 93 Cannondale M 800 Beast of the East
    Posts
    1,482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by graytotoro View Post
    I rode over a thumbtack on the weekend. Lodged all the way in...the knobbly part of the knobbly tire. Just missed the tube.

    Also, on a related note, is it considered bad to run a bigger tube on a narrower tire? I've got a 1.5-2" tube and am thinking about getting a 1.25" tire.
    It's not a huge issue, just makes it more difficult to mount the tire without twisting or pinching the tube. This probably wouldn't work if your tire were any narrower.
    Guy K. Browne

    Schwalbe North America
    USA | CANADA | Central/South America
    1-888-700-5860 | 250-598-0397 ext.105
    www.schwalbetires.com

  11. #11
    Senior Member Monster Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warwick, UK
    My Bikes
    2000-something 3 speed commuter, 1990-something Raleigh Scorpion
    Posts
    1,048
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tubes are fairly forgiving, and you'll get away with putting a smaller tube in a slightly too-big tyre (the tube expands a bit more to fit the space) or putting a larger tube in a smaller tyre, but fitting is more difficult. If you're somewhere around the borderline between two tube sizes, I'd recommend the slightly larger one.
    I've got a bike, you can ride if you like it's got a basket, a bell that rings and things to make it look good- Pink Floyd, 1967

  12. #12
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,028
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tube should be fine if you get it to fit. I have 20-25mm tubes in 35mm tires. I don’t think you will be able to fit a 2” tube in a 1.25” tire (I can’t).

    There is all kinds of flat protection out there, from the thinner lighter Kevlar membrane, to the thicker heavier padding in the tire. Many good tire companies offer normal, medium, and heavy duty flat protection. I have some pretty big slices in some of my tire tread, but nothing that has gone through. Generally the only flats I have gotten are pinch flats (sharp corner with too much weight on the wheel and/or not enough air).

    Knobbies are just going to slow you down, and offer minimal flat protection. It does work to a limited degree, but it isn’t the best way to protect yourself.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •