Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-14-05, 05:10 PM   #1
Charles Ramsey
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Is a commuting bike a touring bike?

Touring bikes and commuters are rarer than racing bikes and mountain bikes If you design a bike that tours and commutes maybe the manufacturers will start making them.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 05:57 PM   #2
Grasschopper
He drop me
 
Grasschopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central PA
Bikes: '03 Marin Mill Valley, '06 Cannondale Rush, '02 Eddy Merckx Corsa 0.1, '07 Bottecchia Euro Sprint Tour Comp Elite Pro 1000
Posts: 11,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't get it, what are you looking for. Many companies now have flat bar road bikes which IMO seem to be a good choice for Commuting and or Touring. For instance my Marin Mill Valler has 700c wheels centilever brakes plenty of room and braze-ons for racks and fenders and larger 700c tires plus a more upright riding position. Anything missing that you need for commuting or touring?
__________________
The views expressed by this poster do not reflect the views of BikeForums.net.
Grasschopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 06:12 PM   #3
BostonFixed
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 4,416
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It could be.
BostonFixed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 06:24 PM   #4
DanO220
SoCal Commuter
 
DanO220's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Agua Dulce, CA
Bikes: Surly Crosscheck single/9 speed convertible, Novara Buzz beater
Posts: 592
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No. But a touring bike is definately a commuter bike.
And yes. By all means make it a CrossCheck.

DanO
DanO220 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 09:17 PM   #5
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,763
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
There are plenty of bikes on the market now that fit that description. It's not really a rare thing.
2manybikes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 09:24 PM   #6
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manybikes
There are plenty of bikes on the market now that fit that description. It's not really a rare thing.
For me, the ideal bike that could be used for both commuting and loaded touring would have chainstays at least 18 inches long (to use wide saddlebags), a wheelbase 42 inches long (to soak up rough roads), braze-ons for front and rear racks, braze-ons for fenders, and clearance under the brakes for beefy tires (at least 32mm or larger) plus room for fenders.

If there are "plenty" of bikes on the market like what I am describing, they are well hidden at Houston bike stores.
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-05, 10:47 PM   #7
dee-vee
vegan powered
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Chico, Ca
Bikes:
Posts: 385
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Check out the Specialized Sirrus. I just got me one.
dee-vee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 02:12 AM   #8
Becca
Get outdoors! :)
 
Becca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Charlotte, NC
Bikes: Schwinn Sierra 700 Limited Edition
Posts: 456
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Ramsey
Touring bikes and commuters are rarer than racing bikes and mountain bikes If you design a bike that tours and commutes maybe the manufacturers will start making them.
Surly Long Haul Trucker. There are others, too, but you have to dig to find them.
Becca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 03:35 AM   #9
cyclezealot
Senior Member
 
cyclezealot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
Bikes: Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike
Posts: 13,172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
My touring bike I use for both touring and commuting..I carry too much stuff to work, I guess...So it works for me.
cyclezealot is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 04:13 AM   #10
Sloth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
If there are "plenty" of bikes on the market like what I am describing, they are well hidden at Houston bike stores.
They are well hidden at most bike stores. For whatever reason, the market seems to have fallen into two categories - MTBs which are often impractical (and almost always inefficient, as spec'ed), or racing bikes. The former seem to come with varying degrees of suspension and knobby tires. Not so hot for a road commute, at best. These may have rack/fender brazeons, but often do not.

The racing bikes, if they actually do have fender clearance along with clearance for wide enough tires for comfort/durability, often lack braze ons. And almost always lack chainstays with heel clearance.

Either bike is a sub-par commuter.

The alternative, the hybrid, is OK for short commutes and noodling around town, but falls flat for longer commutes.

You can get an LHT or a Cross check or a Soma double cross or a Soma Smoothie ES, but try and find one stocked/built up.

When you consider how much time your average rider spends actually (a) offroad or (b) racing versus the time they could spend profitably commuting, or just running around town with a practical bike, it makes no sense.
Sloth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 04:50 AM   #11
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,932
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
From mainstream manufacturers there is the Specialized Sequoia. This seems perfect for commuting, if a little flash to be left unattended on the street.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 12:44 PM   #12
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 18,295
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
A commuting bike is one that has wheels. And all the stuff to make the wheels go. That's all that's really needed. I commute to work on a mountain bike, on a touring bike, on a very short and sporty road bike. I've even commuted on a tandem. Commuter bikes don't have to be task specific, they just have to go.

Stuart Black
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 12:59 PM   #13
LLCoolJessie
Junior Member
 
LLCoolJessie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Denver, Colorado
Bikes:
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ride my Bianchi Volpe 4 miles to work everyday. I also rode it 5,000 miles across the country. I guess if you're totally anal about comfort and weight and all that, then you'll need a different bike for every application... that's good for bike manufacturers, bad for your garage.

So, do they make a commuter bike that's also a touring bike? I think the real question is, will you ride your touring bike to work; will you tour on your commuter?
LLCoolJessie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-05, 09:44 AM   #14
andygates
Just riding
 
andygates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Exeter, UK
Bikes: Cannondale Bad Boy / Mercian track / BOB trailer / Moulton recumbent project
Posts: 651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yep, 'cos I have one do-all everyday workhorse bike. Get a bike you're happy on every day and there's no reason not to take it on tour!
andygates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-05, 12:48 PM   #15
PanPanX
Ride On!!
 
PanPanX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Temple City, CA
Bikes: 2004 OCR3, 1989 Nishiki Sport, 2003 Kona Blast, 2007 Fuji Track
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
A commuting bike is one that has wheels. And all the stuff to make the wheels go. That's all that's really needed. I commute to work on a mountain bike, on a touring bike, on a very short and sporty road bike. I've even commuted on a tandem. Commuter bikes don't have to be task specific, they just have to go.

Stuart Black
yup. couldnt of said it better myself. anything can be a commuter or tourer. you could even use a mtb for a road race if you wanted to. you wont win any races, or anything, but you could.
PanPanX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-05, 01:05 PM   #16
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,763
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
The bike shops stock what sells, and the manufacturers make what sells. There is a lot of overlap for the jobs that different bikes can do. There is a huge amount of overlap of the definition of commuting or touring. There are bikes made and sold as touring bikes. They need to go a long way, be reliable, and safely carry a lot of weight. They make wonderful commuter bikes..

Just about anything can be a commuter bike for someone.

A track bike with no brakes, to an all out down hill bike, to a $10,000 road bike. For me personally a commuter has fenders, a huge mud flap, and is somewhat of a beater bike too not attract to much attention, and so I don't leave my best bikes locked up outside unattended. I use a single speed with fenders, and two or three bikes I bought for a few bucks and added fenders. I can use an mtb with studded tires in the snow and ice.

If I lived in L.A. and could store my bike in my own office, then I could ride an expensive road bike every day, and be happy.

I think this makes it hard to market a bike labeled as mainly for commuting.
2manybikes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-05, 04:09 PM   #17
Charles Ramsey
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Thanks everybody With 16.7 inch chainstays my feet hit the brakes never mind panier clearance. A commuter needs a stronger frame longer chainstays and stronger wheels. The people putting the most stress on the wheels would be people with a child in a safety seat on the back. There was an article in cycling science that tested a lugged joint and a bronzed welded joint and a tig welded joint. The lugged joint was over twice as strong as the tig welded one. A tig welded frame needs bigger tubes the surley uses a 1 x 1/8 seat tube.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-05, 09:59 PM   #18
grolby
Senior Member
 
grolby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: BOSTON BABY
Bikes:
Posts: 9,377
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Ramsey
Thanks everybody With 16.7 inch chainstays my feet hit the brakes never mind panier clearance. A commuter needs a stronger frame longer chainstays and stronger wheels. The people putting the most stress on the wheels would be people with a child in a safety seat on the back. There was an article in cycling science that tested a lugged joint and a bronzed welded joint and a tig welded joint. The lugged joint was over twice as strong as the tig welded one. A tig welded frame needs bigger tubes the surley uses a 1 x 1/8 seat tube.
My understanding is that welded construction superseded lugged construction simply because it is cheaper mass produce welded bikes. A lugged steel frame will have significantly stronger joints than a welded steel frame of the same quality. Don't know about weight, but that's not very relevant for a tourer/commuter.

Those older touring bikes make great commuters!
grolby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-05, 10:14 PM   #19
catatonic
Chairman of the Bored
 
catatonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2004 Raleigh Talus, 2001 Motobecane Vent Noir (Custom build for heavy riders)
Posts: 5,825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hmm, I was half tempted to trade in my mountain bike for either a LHT or cross-check...so in comparison, what's the differences between them? Can they both use wide tires, riding stance, etc?

FWIW, my current commuter is a road racer, and it really doesnt seem to like the rough roads it's seen the past month. my mountain bike is just not fast enough to deal with traffic, so I'm looking for something in between.
catatonic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-05, 04:31 PM   #20
halfbiked
dangerous with tools
 
halfbiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: minneapolis
Bikes: fat, long, single & fast
Posts: 4,502
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by catatonic
Hmm, I was half tempted to trade in my mountain bike for either a LHT or cross-check...so in comparison, what's the differences between them? Can they both use wide tires, riding stance, etc?

FWIW, my current commuter is a road racer, and it really doesnt seem to like the rough roads it's seen the past month. my mountain bike is just not fast enough to deal with traffic, so I'm looking for something in between.
If you want to use fat tires, you need surly's large marge.

What is slow about your mtn bike? Mine's slow, but I have fat, agressive tires. If I get off my lazy @ss and actually start commuting I'll put slicks on there. Its pretty easy to tell myself that now ain't the time to start commuting, though it has warmed up to 20 today.
halfbiked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-05, 11:08 PM   #21
thechrisproject
Guy with bike
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes:
Posts: 401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm happy with mine:
http://www.gunnarbikes.com/sport.php
thechrisproject is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-05, 09:08 AM   #22
max-a-mill
aspiring dirtbag commuter
 
max-a-mill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: philly
Bikes:
Posts: 2,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfbiked
If you want to use fat tires, you need surly's large marge.
uhh, those are rims for snow tires... unless your commuting across unplowed roads preparing for the iditarod, your gonna NOT want those.

i built my surly crosscheck for about 600-700 bucks total, new frame, used wheelset, and used parts from my garage. i can't imagine anything much more versitile for commuting/touring for 400/500 bucks (except maybe something you find in the trash or used at a thriftshop).

i'd imagine the long haul truckers gotta ride like a cadillac as this bike is pretty damn stable already.
max-a-mill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-05, 12:32 PM   #23
chris hansen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: St. Paul, Mn
Bikes:
Posts: 136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Ramsey
Touring bikes and commuters are rarer than racing bikes and mountain bikes If you design a bike that tours and commutes maybe the manufacturers will start making them.
It seems like any touring bike should make a good commuter.

Cyclocross bikes might be worth looking at, I have a LeMond Poprad and that has plenty of clearance for any tire/fender combo you might want and with a rack on the back it seems to work well. I can't use some of the bigger panniers because I have size 14 feet and I kick them. It does have 17" chainstays though and I think you will have to get a touring bike to get longer ones.

Some of the hybrids or 29" mountain bikes look like they might work well if you prefer straight handlebars. I thought the Trek 7700 FX looked pretty good. My brother plans to build a karate monkey for commuting, it should be just about bullet proof.
chris hansen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-05, 01:03 PM   #24
jnbacon
Proshpero
 
jnbacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Bikes: Fixed Surly CrossCheck, Redline Conquest Pro
Posts: 712
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by catatonic
Hmm, I was half tempted to trade in my mountain bike for either a LHT or cross-check...so in comparison, what's the differences between them? Can they both use wide tires, riding stance, etc?
Those questions and more can be answered at Surly's site. Just look under the Frames section.

A brief glance shows the Cross Check taking only 700cm tires, up to 45mm, with fender clearance.
The LHT takes 26" tires up to 2.1", and 700c tires on only the larger sized frames. So the LHT
can take wider tires, but 45mm seems wide to me. Maybe not to some.
jnbacon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-05, 01:46 PM   #25
chris hansen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: St. Paul, Mn
Bikes:
Posts: 136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by catatonic
Hmm, I was half tempted to trade in my mountain bike for either a LHT or cross-check...so in comparison, what's the differences between them? Can they both use wide tires, riding stance, etc?
The LHT has longer chainstays so you could carry larger panniers without kicking them.
chris hansen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:55 AM.