Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Will my leg muscles get used to this?

    Granted I am older now and haven't ridden long distances for many years, but I need my leg muscles to get up to speed, and I am careful not to push myself on my long commute so they can adjust, any tips on this?
    Last edited by SPECELIZEDRIDER; 12-18-12 at 04:14 AM.

  2. #2
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
    Posts
    3,958
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your question is really unclear. Re-read it and you'll see. What are you asking? What is "this"?
    Your signature contains too many lines and must be shortened. You may only have up to 2 line(s). Long text may have been implicitly wrapped, causing it to be

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My leg muscles dont seem to recover as quickly as I would like, so maybe I should stretch more, or will they just get stronger as time goes on?

  4. #4
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
    Posts
    3,958
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What sort of riding are you doing (distance, speed, climbing/flat)? How long have you been doing it? What sort of shape are you in?
    Your signature contains too many lines and must be shortened. You may only have up to 2 line(s). Long text may have been implicitly wrapped, causing it to be

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jyl View Post
    What sort of riding are you doing (distance, speed, climbing/flat)? How long have you been doing it? What sort of shape are you in?
    I am getting back into long distance commuting, about 15 miles one way, carrying about 20 to 30 LBS in panniers. I was able to do 30 miles and not even think of it at one time and this is on a mountain bike. it is mostly up hill to work and the opposite going home, except for one fairly steep hill I call the grinder.

  6. #6
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
    Posts
    3,958
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You should get used to that pretty quickly, say in a few weeks.

    Maybe reduce the pannier load at first, is there any way you can avoid carrying that 20-30 lb for the first week or so?

    Also leave early so that you have time to take a rest during the ride, either by riding slowly for a bit or by stopping somewhere (coffee, etc). Again, just for the first week or so.

    I'm not sure what sort of "uphill" we're talking about. If you can turn around and coast down at running speed or better, then it is a "climb". If not, then it is a "false flat", that is a very slight grade (1%, 2%, etc). When you're just getting back into it, false flats are tiring. When you have a few weeks under your belt, false flats are nothing special. Climbs, however, are always climbs . . .

    Make sure your tires are well inflated, and if you are riding knobbies, put in road slicks. Tires make a big difference to your effort on longer rides.
    Your signature contains too many lines and must be shortened. You may only have up to 2 line(s). Long text may have been implicitly wrapped, causing it to be

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jyl View Post
    You should get used to that pretty quickly, say in a few weeks.

    Maybe reduce the pannier load at first, is there any way you can avoid carrying that 20-30 lb for the first week or so?

    Also leave early so that you have time to take a rest during the ride, either by riding slowly for a bit or by stopping somewhere (coffee, etc). Again, just for the first week or so.

    I'm not sure what sort of "uphill" we're talking about. If you can turn around and coast down at running speed or better, then it is a "climb". If not, then it is a "false flat", that is a very slight grade (1%, 2%, etc). When you're just getting back into it, false flats are tiring. When you have a few weeks under your belt, false flats are nothing special. Climbs, however, are always climbs . . .

    Make sure your tires are well inflated, and if you are riding knobbies, put in road slicks. Tires make a big difference to your effort on longer rides.
    Yeah Im converting to an all terrain tire, as I want some off road ability but I dont need the aggressive tread pattern.I pretty much need everything I carry but I ditched the bike lock for the ride as I really dont nee it for where I go.

  8. #8
    Senior Member work4bike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Atlantic Beach Florida
    Posts
    618
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do exercises like this, there's more, look under crossfit exercises and you'll be getting strong very fast. Gotta push the body or else it'll take forever. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVBgKB4Gnsw
    "The aim of science is to make difficult things understandable in a simpler way; the aim of poetry is to state simple things in an incomprehensible way. The two are incompatible."

    -- Paul Dirac

  9. #9
    Senior Member curbtender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SF Bay Area, East bay
    My Bikes
    Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like stated, give it a few weeks and the issue's will all slip away. Las Vegas? Gets a bit windy too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member The Chemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    My Bikes
    Giant FCR3500
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SPECELIZEDRIDER View Post
    I am getting back into long distance commuting, about 15 miles one way, carrying about 20 to 30 LBS in panniers. I was able to do 30 miles and not even think of it at one time and this is on a mountain bike. it is mostly up hill to work and the opposite going home, except for one fairly steep hill I call the grinder.
    My commute is about the same length as yours. For about the first month after I started doing it (last April) my legs were constantly feeling like jello after riding, but after that it became much easier. Your body will get used to it pretty quick.
    Luke Richardson - Shanghai, China
    Giant FCR3500 - "Big Red"

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
    My commute is about the same length as yours. For about the first month after I started doing it (last April) my legs were constantly feeling like jello after riding, but after that it became much easier. Your body will get used to it pretty quick.
    That is very encouraging to hear, my roommate says I should get a moped, hell no I want the challenge of getting in shape, this forces me to do it, and I love saving money too.
    Yeah it gets windy out here so that really makes it a challenge too.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    621
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Ride lots."

    Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jolly_ross View Post
    "Ride lots."

    Eddy Merckx
    That is not a problem, as my body has to catch up to my brain, I love to ride and have lofty goals of personal fitness goals.

  14. #14
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,470
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You say you're "older" but you don't specify. There have been guys in their 30s here complaining that they're "older".

    I'm 55. I resumed cycling at age 49 after a 35 year absence. I quickly learned that I could no longer just hop on, ride miles and miles, and not pay for it.

    I found that building up takes me much longer than it used to, and I have to work harder at it.

    I found that rest is just as important as working at it. Everyone's different, but if I don't have two rest days in the week, (not necessarily consecutive) I don't progress, and even begin to backslide. If I'm using my commutes to train for another ride, I really have to give up weekend cycling in order to have rest days. When I'm "in training" two rest days together is essential. The harder I work, the harder I have to rest.

    I don't stretch or warm-up before a ride. My warm-up is in-ride, spinning lightly for the first mile or two while working out the kinks.

    Equally important is recovery. If I plop right into a chair at work or at home, that's trouble.

    It took me several months at the start to rebuild to the point where I didn't have to *rest* partway to work. I don't recall pain-free legs for a couple of years. And these days, if my goal is pain-free legs, then I'm not riding hard enough to accomplish anything else--maintaining speed, strength, endurance, or reasonable cardio fitness.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  15. #15
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
    Posts
    3,958
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Add bar ends to your MTB, they are cheap and let you get into a more aggressive position. Also lower your handlebar to the height of your saddle or lower.

    A more aggressive position is more aero, especially helpful if you are bucking headwinds. It is also a more powerful pedaling position, engages your glutes (butt) more. It may take a while for your back to get used to it so lower the bar in increments.

    Many mountain bikes have handlebars that are excessively wide. There's no need for your hands to be more than shoulder width apart. A wider position is less aero but more importantly is more tiring - imagine holding a pushup with your hands far apart versus with your hands right under your shoulders. Usually you can simply remove the grips, slide the shifters and brake levers over, cut an inch off each end of the bar, and replace the grips - ask a bike shop if you're unsure.

    Make sure your saddle height is correct. A saddle too low makes pedaling much harder, it will toast your knees in no time.

    Finally, after you get a few months in, you might consider clipless pedals. Read about them, there are various opinions and plenty of riders don't use them. But they allow a powerful pedal stroke that uses more of your muscles and thus helps endurance.
    Your signature contains too many lines and must be shortened. You may only have up to 2 line(s). Long text may have been implicitly wrapped, causing it to be

  16. #16
    Senior Member arsprod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis
    My Bikes
    Basso Coral, Cannondale H400, Giant Sedona
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    You say you're "older" but you don't specify. There have been guys in their 30s here complaining that they're "older".

    I'm 55. I resumed cycling at age 49 after a 35 year absence. I quickly learned that I could no longer just hop on, ride miles and miles, and not pay for it.

    I found that building up takes me much longer than it used to, and I have to work harder at it.

    I found that rest is just as important as working at it. Everyone's different, but if I don't have two rest days in the week, (not necessarily consecutive) I don't progress, and even begin to backslide. If I'm using my commutes to train for another ride, I really have to give up weekend cycling in order to have rest days. When I'm "in training" two rest days together is essential. The harder I work, the harder I have to rest.

    I don't stretch or warm-up before a ride. My warm-up is in-ride, spinning lightly for the first mile or two while working out the kinks.

    Equally important is recovery. If I plop right into a chair at work or at home, that's trouble.

    It took me several months at the start to rebuild to the point where I didn't have to *rest* partway to work. I don't recall pain-free legs for a couple of years. And these days, if my goal is pain-free legs, then I'm not riding hard enough to accomplish anything else--maintaining speed, strength, endurance, or reasonable cardio fitness.
    +1 to all tsl's comments. I'm 52, my commute is 11-17 miles (depending on the day) and when I restarted commuting I had to remember this is about transportation not riding the peloton. I also don't warm up and once I get to work or home will walk around a bit especially in this colder weather. Slow down, take your time! As another forumite says, if you're not having fun you're not doing it right!
    I'm slow, go around

  17. #17
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    12,211
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    nujtrition and nutrition timing. eat a meal an hour before the ride. then my fav is a small box of raisins just before heading out the door. consume liquid protein just after the ride and a little bit of simple carbs too. for the ride home you'll need a decent meal/snack late in the day like hard boiled egg, cheese and ******* then a nother box of raisins and another protein juice combo at home. those legs will come right along ... :-) you might try 48 hrs rest between commute days for a few weeks.
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  18. #18
    Senior Member nkfrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized Ruby Pro aka "Rhubarb" / and a backup road bike
    Posts
    1,515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My first commutes were age 52. The full commute distance was 35 miles round trip, which completely destroyed me. I was not a strong cyclist and the hills were a struggle.
    I started with partial commutes, drive to a safe parking lot 1/2 of the way to work; then bike the rest of the distance. I also did not commute every day. On Fridays I worked up to a full commute when I had a shorter workday and a weekend to recover.
    20-30# in the panniers is a lot. Do you really need all that stuff? I was able to keep the bike cable/lock on the rack at work and do not take my laptop home from work. Toiletries are rebottled into travel-size containers. I keep a pair of shoes and some sweaters at my desk so I don't have to carry big/bulky items back and forth.

  19. #19
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    1,474
    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Put Yourself and the Bike on The Bus for the Uphill Leg,so as to be On Time. then enjoy the return Home..

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    4,761
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I started commuting when I was 55, but I've been riding continuously over the years. Even so, the first few commutes were hard, but they got easier over the first few weeks in the spring. By the beginning of summer I was blowing by everybody. I don't usually carry a lot of gear though, I've even stopped carrying my laptop. I never carry a lock, I just leave that locked to a bike rack outside, even though I have indoor parking. They don't want me to leave it indoors.

    Give it some time and you'll be fine.

  21. #21
    Senior Member wolfchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
    My Bikes
    I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes
    Posts
    2,356
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good nutrition and rest is important... If I had to ride 30 miles everyday I would also use a bike with skinny tires and drop bars...tires make a huge difference for such a long commute, drop bars are also a lot more comfortable for longer distances. Mountain bikes can be fitted with drop bars and skinnier tires to make them faster and easier to ride for long distances on the road.

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    TSL makes some very good comments, as well as Rumrunn on the need to focus on nutrition. I am 57, and just getting back on a bike after many years. I first trained on a stationary bike in the fitness center at work for a couple of months late this last summer, and started the 20 mile round trip at the end of September. I needed two rest days after each round trip ride for the first month or so, but now am up to riding every other day during the week with a longer weekend ride (25 to 30 miles right now) as well. I also don't stretch before I ride, but I do think it helps the muscles recover a great deal to stretch well after riding. So you might want to give that a try.

    Good luck!

  23. #23
    Senior Member a1penguin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    My Bikes
    2012 Trek 7.5 FX DISC, 2002 Trek 2200 WSD, 1997 Specialized Rockhopper Al Comp
    Posts
    2,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    You say you're "older" but you don't specify. There have been guys in their 30s here complaining that they're "older".

    I'm 55. I resumed cycling at age 49 after a 35 year absence. I quickly learned that I could no longer just hop on, ride miles and miles, and not pay for it.

    I found that building up takes me much longer than it used to, and I have to work harder at it.
    ^^^^ This. It's going to take more than "a few weeks" if you have hit the big 50. When I started riding again three years ago, it was a struggle. I started out commuting 8.5 miles each way twice a week, then three times a week on MWF. That gave me a day to recover. I rode three days a week for quite a while before I attempted two consecutive days of commuting. It took a good amount of discipline for me to get over the hump, but I am so glad that I did. And I live in California where "California winter" is an oxymoron and there's not a drop of rain for seven months out of a year.
    2012 Cannondale Synapse 3, 2012 Trek 7.5 FX Disc, 2003 Trek 2200 WSD, 1997 Specialized Rockhopper Al Comp

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    WKY
    My Bikes
    2014 Trek Crossrip LTD, 2013 Raleigh Misceo
    Posts
    406
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm pretty new at this myself. Started commuting on a mountain bike in August. I saw pretty quickly that I was putting out a lot of effort pushing the 2" wide 26" tall tires. I was able to pick up a hybrid(used) that has a 700 x 38 wheel/tire combination. The difference is unbelievable. When I took the hybrid for a test ride on a local greenway hardpack trail, I "pushed it" a little bit, and literally scared myself with how fast the bike was.

    If you do a little geometry, you can see why. The formula, I believe, is 2 x pi(3.14) x r(radius). This will give you the circumference of the wheels. I'm sure some others on here have exact diameters that include tires. If you work off wheel size only there is 6" difference between the circumference of a 26" wheel and a 27" wheel. In other words every time that taller wheel rolls around, you are 6" farther down the road!

    There is also the issue of rolling resistance. The tires on my mtn bike had a max pressure of 60lbs. The hybrids are 80lbs. Basically there is much less contact with the road.

    The bike I traded for had knobby tires on it. I didn't need those as the hardpack greenway is the closest thing to off-road that I ride. I put some 700 x 38 road tires on and that also increased the speed.
    Those give a comfy ride for my 210 lbs and do not just sink if you hit a soft spot on the greenway.

    It sounds like you are not really into hardcore mtn biking, so the hybrid with a shock absorbing fork, might work for you. Mine will allow the shock to lock out, if needed, which I would use on a long road commute.

    There is a lot of good advice given in the previous posts. I am 54 so I know about getting sore and recovery. Especially when trying to "build up" to longer rides. If its an option, a 48hr rest might do wonders. I missed 2 days a couple of weeks ago. I felt like superman when I got back on the bike!

    I know part of the idea is to save money, not spend it. However, something that makes the ride more doable, is more like an investment. Check the classified, craigslist, etc. I bet you can find a more commuter friendly (considering the distance) bike for cheap.

    Keep on looking for "adjustments" to overcome the little problems encountered in making your commute. Sometimes little things make a huge difference. Hang in there, have fun, and be safe!

  25. #25
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    12,211
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 for staging stuff at work like food and clothes. I used to use my car some days to stock up so that I was carrying the lest possbile in the way of daily nutrition or laundry or whatever.
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •