Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 41 of 41
  1. #26
    http://www.538.nl acidfast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    England / CPH
    My Bikes
    2010 Cube Acid
    Posts
    4,937
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)


    Movimento 5 Stelle (M5S)
    Rohloffs seen on the commute: 3

  2. #27
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
    Are you in Cali now, Burton? I've always heard, since the Fifties when my dad lived there, through the early 200os when I traveled to SAm, that theft is a huge problem in the city. Is that overblown, or are there neighborhoods that you can ride in that are much safer? Anyway, I'd have thought extra security would be preferable to "lite" security, so I'm curious about your decision.
    Hi chaadster - still in Montreal at the moment. Have a house in Cali with a garage. Like every city in the world - some parts of town are safer than others and some I recommend avoiding.

    Crime is a problem and very few people will even leave a car parked in the street overnight unless a private security guard is on duty for the street. But the risk factor there is similar to Montreal in that you can't leave a decent bike outside unattended for long periods of time without attracting thieves. So the key word is 'unattended'.

    The only two places the bike will be locked up are: at a cafe (there's a short list of places we stop off at) and at shopping centers. At a cafe the lock is only to prevent an 'opportunistic' thief from grabbing the bike and riding off. Shopping centers are 'gated communities' with guards at entrances. Cars and bicycles are given a ticket - the serial no of the bike is written on the ticket. There's a bike rack beside the guard post.

    The reason for the Bordo is that it can be attached right across the handlebars using an HED adjustable Lolipop on the stem. Plain view and a reminder to use it. The light version makes it as little extra weight to carry around as possible. It has the same rating as the other models. The combination means there's no key to forget and more than one person can use them.

    So if the girls decide to go out on their own ocassionally - chances are highest they'll use them and have no issues. Private security, military street patrols and police presence are pretty good in the area near the Unicentro we live in so risks of a mugging are pretty slim. If that sounds foreboding - the police and military are much less taken with 'posturing' than in North America and its quite common for them to say 'hi' when you pass them in the street.

    Its impossible to eliminate all risks - carjackings have taken place in Montreal. In some respects I feel safer in Cali. The lack of a large middle class has some interesting side effects - fewer drug addicts, fewer alcoholics and fewer drunk drivers on the road. And things are improving. The city of Cali recenty invested a huge sum of money in infrastructure improvements. A couple more years and I expect to move down permanently. OK - maybe we'll vacation in Canada during the summer. It gets pretty rainy in Colombia that time of year.

    There are actually organized bicycle rides every week and some streets are closed to traffic so cyclists can just have fun. Very much like Ottawa and Toronto in Canada.
    Last edited by Burton; 01-18-13 at 04:13 PM.

  3. #28
    Thread Killer
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    3,669
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the reply, Burton; I certainly get where you're coming from. I was also interested to hear your thoughts because a buddy and I working on a cyclotouring trip, and SoAm destinations are high on the list. I think we're leaning towards southern Brazil's wine country down into Uruguay because, well, it's wine country!
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  4. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    152
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Does anyone know if this lock can be cut with bolt cutters? I live in a low theft area where 95% of people with bike locks are using cable locks that can be cut by bolt cutters, which is why I've always opted for a U-lock instead.
    "To me, it's always a good idea to always carry two sacks of something when you walk around. That way, if anybody says, 'Hey, can you give me a hand?,' you can say, 'Sorry, got these sacks.'"

    -- Jack Handey [Deep Thoughts]

  5. #30
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    40,134
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Does anyone know if this lock can be cut with bolt cutters?


    Not likely with the usual 2 foot long handled ones . 6 foot would be different..
    Go to Bike Radar's site, they Did Destructive Testing on locks.
    they did what it needed to defeat them and rated how hard it was, and what it took..

  6. #31
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dvald001 View Post
    Does anyone know if this lock can be cut with bolt cutters? I live in a low theft area where 95% of people with bike locks are using cable locks that can be cut by bolt cutters, which is why I've always opted for a U-lock instead.
    There ain't no guarantees in life. Had someone come in the shop last year who had used a U-lock to secure an expensive mtb bike. He had of course removed the rear wheel and locked it to the frame and rear wheel and a post.

    But when he got back, he found that some enterprising individual had taken the front fork(Fox), and handle bars (FSA) complete with XT shifters and levers. All that took was an allan key and some cable cutters.

    So if you have something worth stealing, no lock is going to protect it completely. But if you're in a low risk area, this is a lot smaller and lighter than a U-lock, lots better than a cable, better than the cheapest U-locks and not quite on par with the most expensive ones.

  7. #32
    Vegan on a bicycle smasha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    wellington NZ (via NJ & NC)
    Posts
    936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dvald001 View Post
    Does anyone know if this lock can be cut with bolt cutters? I live in a low theft area where 95% of people with bike locks are using cable locks that can be cut by bolt cutters, which is why I've always opted for a U-lock instead.
    it would probably take a larger (larger than 24-inch) bolt cutter to cut through it, and it probably wouldn't be easy.

    but... i suspect that the handles of a 24-inch bolt-cutter could be used as a lever to bust the lock. if it doesn't bust the lock, it'll just destroy the bike.
    "When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race." - H.G. Wells

  8. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston-ish
    My Bikes
    Bridgestone X0-1 (1992) PURPLE!!!!, Trek 3.1 (2011)
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My initial reaction is to echo your .
    On the other hand, for when I leave the bike unattended in the office all day, a keyed U lock is my primary lock, with the Bordo as an auxiliary.
    And for the shorter lockups in reasonable areas, as someone wiser than I noted, the main purpose of a bike lock is not to make my bike hard to steal--it's to make it harder to steal than the next guy's. I think that the Bordo probably does that pretty well, especially if the other guy has used a cable lock.

  9. #34
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post


    The video really doesn't explain anything but implies that the combination can be 'felt out' by feedback through the release mechanism. OK so I'm not on YouTube but I do have two of these locks in front of me and after an hour of trying to duplicate what is apparently an effortless safecracking - I'm not the least bit worried about the security of the lock.

    Following up on a positive note - the 'Lite' version really DOES make a U-lock feel like a boat anchor - as well as being a lot smaller and easier to find a spot for. And that handle bar stem installation strategy worked out perfectly. Leaves the water bottle mount available for a water bottle - which will be heavier and is better mounted lower down anyway.

    I'm still looking for mounting alternatives for some things - this isn't one of them.
    Last edited by Burton; 03-07-13 at 07:10 PM.

  10. #35
    Senior Member ottawa_adam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ottawa Canada
    My Bikes
    kona dew hybrid, MEC shadowlands
    Posts
    448
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a Bordo Lite but I do realize the weakness is in the rivets. I typically use it as a secondary lock, usually for the front wheel, as a supplement to a regular ulock. I may use it as a primary lock if I'm just running into a grocery store for a quick visit, but not often.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Slaninar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Novi Sad
    My Bikes
    Custom assembled on Polar Forrester frame. :)
    Posts
    1,098
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    for whatever reason, bike thieves almost never leave the broken remains of locks behind. A fact that makes most lock guarantees pretty much worthless if they require the remains of the lock.
    Broken lock is a thieves "handwriting". By seeing how it was broken, you can gues which thief broke it. Even if they use gloves. That's why it's important to hide broken/picked locks, cylinders etc. Throw them in a river or something. Also a good idea to hide one's tools - no evidence.


    Abus bordo are decent quality build, with a very good lock and key. So protection wise it is good. There are better solutions, but they are a bother to carry, while bordo is by no means weak lock/chain combo. Would recommend it. Paired with anoter decent wire based lock. Avoid combination locks.
    Last edited by Slaninar; 03-08-13 at 02:18 AM.
    Evviva il comunismo e la libertÓ.

  12. #37
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
    (snip) Avoid combination locks.
    You gave a reasonable explanation for everything except this. What's your logic? The security rating is the same and I bought one myself to avoid carrying or losing a key. Since the bikes will be locked ip beside us while we're having coffee - I'd think the choice of combination or keyed entry would be insignificant anyway.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Slaninar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Novi Sad
    My Bikes
    Custom assembled on Polar Forrester frame. :)
    Posts
    1,098
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    You gave a reasonable explanation for everything except this. What's your logic? The security rating is the same and I bought one myself to avoid carrying or losing a key. Since the bikes will be locked ip beside us while we're having coffee - I'd think the choice of combination or keyed entry would be insignificant anyway.
    Abus security rating is stil marketing. Although it does give quite accurate comparison of their products difficulty to cut/break/pick, when it comes to combination locks, they are not as safe as a good key lock. Unles their combination locks are much better than competitions, or have something special. If I could choose between a key and a combination lock, I'd go for a good key.

    For your particular use it is more than enough. Even if you left the bike, locked in a public place, not many thieves will try to pick it, most would rather go for cutting/breaking. If you add the problem of keeping the key safe, combination lock could be the best solution for YOU. However, a decend key lock, unles thieves get a hold of a key, is harder to pick than a combinaton lock. That is why the avoid combination locks comment was made. No offence to combo-lock users meant.
    Last edited by Slaninar; 03-08-13 at 05:50 AM.
    Evviva il comunismo e la libertÓ.

  14. #39
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
    Abus security rating is stil marketing. Although it does give quite accurate comparison of their products difficulty to cut/break/pick, when it comes to combination locks, they are not as safe as a good key lock. Unles their combination locks are much better than competitions, or have something special. If I could choose between a key and a combination lock, I'd go for a good key.

    For your particular use it is more than enough. Even if you left the bike, locked in a public place, not many thieves will try to pick it, most would rather go for cutting/breaking. If you add the problem of keeping the key safe, combination lock could be the best solution for YOU. However, a decend key lock, unles thieves get a hold of a key, is harder to pick than a combinaton lock. That is why the avoid combination locks comment was made. No offence to combo-lock users meant.
    OK -Thanks for the explaination.

    Whats enlightening is that many of the same companies offer security products for motorcycles as well as bicycles, and whats considered high end for a bicycle is still mediocre for a motorcycle. The Abus Granite Extreme Plus 59 is a $400 chain link lock that uses hardened 12mm links and weighs as much as my bike!

    I still think a pitbull chained to the item is the best deterrent.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Slaninar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Novi Sad
    My Bikes
    Custom assembled on Polar Forrester frame. :)
    Posts
    1,098
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only security is a garage (out of sight), or, if it can't be garaged, a good fat, hard chain tied to a solid anchor (post, metal fence etc).


    I'd recommend the most expensive and fattest Abus chain and lock you can find. This will also be breakable, but it will take time. Thieves will look for the easiest bike to steal, so make sure your bike isn't the easiest target -that's what fat chain does. Also, Abus locks are quite difficult to pick.




    In order to get to this info I have enquired experts from both sides of the law.





    1) Good short read on metal, chains etc:
    http://lockitt.com/chaininfo.htm



    2) Tips:
    Try to lock the frame to something immobile, not easily cut.

    Make sure chain isn't close to the ground (ie doesn't lie on the ground) so thieves can not use the ground as leverage, or use hammer/chisel to break locks/chains.

    Make sure both the chain, lock and key mechanism are good. Chain is as good as it's weakest link. If you can afford, Abus stuff that is above protection level 15 (on Abus scale) is good. Don't know about other makes, but any other chain that's over 60 rockwell and a decent lock will probably do.

    If your bike is apealing enough and if there is enough time, any lock/chain can be broken.




    3) Keys:
    Most locks are brute forced. However, there are lockpicks. Rule of thumb:

    Locks with ordinary, regular keys are most easily picked. These keys should be avoided.


    Locks with "double" sided keys can be a bit more complicated.


    (Double sided key)




    Although all the above are not too hard to pick. This one is a bit more tricky, so look for something like that:






    And this:







    4) Chains:

    Look at Abus website. They have a security ranking of their own for their locks-chains. Anything above rank 15 is decent. Anything above 20, 25 is very good (but very expensive).

    Hexagonal chain, over 12mm thick that is core hardened is a decent level of protection to look for. Even 10mm thick chain with the same qualities (hexagonal, core hardened) is very hard to cut with bolt cutters that fit under a jacket, especially if there's no leverage against the ground (i.e. the chain is not lying on the concrete).


    5) Padlock (lock):
    Make sure the chain fits tightly in the lock. Too big is not good. It will make room for leverage with a bar, or cutters. So keep it tight, if buying seperately, first get the chain you can afford, then look for a matching padlock.
    Here's a decent one, about 20 euros here:



    6) Conclusion:

    If secured properly, not left lying close to the ground and so that lock can be easily accessed, these locks can buy you quite a lot of time (if thief doesn't give up in the first place and start looking for another easier target). However, nothing is 100% safe. Make sure you don't leave an expensive (looking) bike in the same place reugularly, or for a long period of time anywhere.
    Last edited by Slaninar; 03-08-13 at 08:44 AM.
    Evviva il comunismo e la libertÓ.

  16. #41
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    My Bikes
    Byron,Sam, The Hunq and that Old Guy
    Posts
    2,346
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
    i use one daily.

    i love it compared to a U lock.

    they're super common over here and i've never seen the broken remnants of one
    Me too! I like the convenience of the the frame mount, the security of the tumblers and, it can make a nice weapon in the wrong neighborhood. Lighter, forgetaboutit!

    Marc
    Read Simply Cycle

    "I can still do everything I used to, but now I'm mature enough to take a nap without being told." - Me

    "You don't deteriorate from age,you age from deterioration" --Joe Weider

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •