Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Hydraulic disc brakes with levers for drop bar?

    I only seem to be able to find flat bar type levers for hydraulic disc brakes. Anyone aware of some, not too expensive, hydraulic brakes with road type levers?

  2. #2
    tsl
    tsl is offline
    Plays in traffic tsl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    My Bikes
    1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
    Posts
    6,394
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not yet.

    There are one-offs around, and you can buy conversion units--a cable-actuated master cylinder. But drop bar levers with integrated master cylinders aren't yet on the market. Expect the first ones to appear in 2014 and to be fairly expensive, as all newly-introduced technology is.

    I've been using Avid BB7 (road) calipers with Shimano road levers on my four-seasons commuter for seven years now. Maybe I don't know what I'm missing, but it's a combination that I'm completely satisfied with. I'm not sure what all the fuss is about with hydros.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  3. #3
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,098
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Soon, but not yet. Expect production versions to be introduced at trade shows this coming Fall.

    There's workarounds like the TRP Parabox, with a cable actuated, steerer mounted master cylinder that hooks up to your extant cable actuated brake levers.


  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    40,136
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the not too expensive threshold has to be much higher than you may wish.

    it, as you see , above, is a higher end feature. here at just short of $400.
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...&category=4324

    Sram is showing a combination master-cylander/brifter, its in big lump in the front of the lever
    body hood

    the other way of putting it in the brake lever is by having Di2 type electronic shifting,
    un like the mechanical brifters, that does not occupy the lever body.
    just the sensor paddles behind the brake lever.
    so the hydro cylander can go in there.


    want lower end hydraulics ?, as you said, , consider changing to straight bars..
    Volume sales numbers favor the bigger, OEM, MTB market.. and volume sales lowers costs per ..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 02-18-13 at 04:29 PM.

  5. #5
    __________ seeker333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,671
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Avid BB7 Road disc calipers work great with road levers - you can buy a set for $100. I've used them for years with Campy levers.

    Why would you want the extra complexity, weight, cost and lower reliability of a hydraulic brake system?

  6. #6
    http://www.538.nl acidfast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    England / CPH
    My Bikes
    2010 Cube Acid
    Posts
    4,937
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    http://www.trickstuff.de/en/products/Doppelmoppel.php

    the biggest advantage to hydraulics on a commuter is that they can go years without any service (including freezing of the cable-driven discs seen in bad weather).
    Movimento 5 Stelle (M5S)
    Rohloffs seen on the commute: 3

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    40,136
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    that is another cable to hydaulic conversion , and they only tell weight, not cost.
    expect the cost like the TRP Parabox, will also be more than just using the Mechanical types ,
    factor, of 2X at least..

    Hope UK also have a mech to Hydraulic converter.. still not cheap.

    OEM builds Of MTB by the million, bring the cost down on their Hydraulic brakes..

    Road there is little motivation to drop from the Higher end, in just a couple years..

    Post UCI saying Cross racing can use them , 1st season,
    though the pros won this year without adopting them.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 02-18-13 at 12:16 PM.

  8. #8
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,322
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    I'm not sure what all the fuss is about with hydros.
    On a road bike, I don't know that I'd notice much of a difference.
    On an MTB, I definitely notice a difference. The brake fade due to cable compression becomes obvious to me when comparing the stopping power on my Elixer-5 hydros on my enduro rig which I can stop and hold a position with a single finger, never worrying about brake slippage while hopping around to position myself on a technical trail section, versus my park/DJ bike with BB7 cable-actuated discs. When doing trials type hopping about, I have to be very careful to maintain a strong pull on the levers or I risk some brake slippage (part of the reason I'm looking to swap them with hydros.)
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  9. #9
    No one carries the DogBoy
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,255
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
    Why would you want the extra complexity, weight, cost and lower reliability of a hydraulic brake system?
    Complexity? Maybe, but its just an oil (Brake Fluid) resevoir and a tube. Brake fluid does not compress, so when you squeeze the lever there is no loss of effort like there is in a wire system. Prolonged braking is easier to maintain also. The system is not that complicated. Weight? maybe. Cost? sure. Lower reliability? Huh? Hydraulic brakes are used in pretty much every auto/motorcycle using disc brakes. Its a very simple system. The only real way to screw it up is to incorrectly bleed the system or to incorrectly attach the tubing such as to create a leak. To what are you attributing the lower reliability? Are the bicycle versions less reliable than the vehicle versions for some reason? Honest question.

  10. #10
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    40,136
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just dont hold your breath on cheap and road hydraulic, being in the same sentence..

    car hydros are not being sold by how little they weigh, and bought separately.

    do you get to choose the brand of brake Toyota uses in your Camry?

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    pdx
    My Bikes
    2007 carpe diem frame custom build, trek 7.9 frame custom build, custom built chinese carbon fiber road bike, shopping bike
    Posts
    2,683
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
    Avid BB7 Road disc calipers work great with road levers - you can buy a set for $100. I've used them for years with Campy levers.
    Why would you want the extra complexity, weight, cost and lower reliability of a hydraulic brake system?
    hydros are the de facto standard for mt biking because they weigh less, offer better modulation/power, auto-adjust, and are far more reliable than mechanicals. they may cost a little more, but boy are they worth it. shimano and maguro mineral oil hydros are basically maintenance free unless the system is compromised. one of the major reasons i commute on flat bar road bikes is because i cannot stand mechanicals. and the quicker rim brakes die, the better as far as i am concerned. using a braking technology that structurally weakens the rim is nucking futz!

    looks like the sram hydraulic brifters will debut this spring:

    Finally, SRAM has lifted the curtain. Tim Johnson rode a set of the upcoming SRAM Red hydraulic road/cross discs to victory at CXLA over the weekend, and VeloNews photographer Wil Matthews was on hand to document.
    http://velonews.competitor.com/2012/...in-cxla_267379
    Last edited by spare_wheel; 02-18-13 at 04:47 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member grolby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BOSTON BABY
    Posts
    6,799
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    the not too expensive threshold has to be much higher than you may wish.
    the other way of putting it in the brake lever is by having Di2 type electronic shifting,
    un like the mechanical brifters, that does not occupy the lever body.
    just the sensor paddles behind the brake lever.
    so the hydro cylander can go in there.
    Winner winner chicken dinner. It's hard for me to imagine Shimano's hydraulic road discs (word is they're coming, nothing else is really known) not being part of a Di2 system. There's just no room for a master cylinder in there with their STI mechanism. Even SRAM, with their much simpler mechanism, had to cram the master cylinder in at an awkward angle.

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
    Avid BB7 Road disc calipers work great with road levers - you can buy a set for $100. I've used them for years with Campy levers.

    Why would you want the extra complexity, weight, cost and lower reliability of a hydraulic brake system?
    Literally every single one of these complaints is mistaken. The maintenance for hydros is definitely a bit more complicated, but should be required less frequently, or at least no more frequently, than a cable brake.

  13. #13
    http://www.538.nl acidfast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    England / CPH
    My Bikes
    2010 Cube Acid
    Posts
    4,937
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grolby View Post
    Literally every single one of these complaints is mistaken. The maintenance for hydros is definitely a bit more complicated, but should be required less frequently, or at least no more frequently, than a cable brake.
    +1
    Movimento 5 Stelle (M5S)
    Rohloffs seen on the commute: 3

  14. #14
    Squeaky Wheel woodway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    1,306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hydros = set and forget until you need to change pads or bleed. I won't miss screwing around with the pad adjustment knobs on my BB7's

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    pdx
    My Bikes
    2007 carpe diem frame custom build, trek 7.9 frame custom build, custom built chinese carbon fiber road bike, shopping bike
    Posts
    2,683
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    this is not true for brands of disc brakes that use dot fluid. it is hygroscopic and braking performance fades over time. even more importantly boiling temp decreases over time. i only buy brakes that use non-toxic and non-hygroscopic mineral oil

  16. #16
    Senior Member PDX Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm going to miss the times when bicycles, once operated on cables, chains and human power. I can understand the need for hydros on MTB but why do road bikes need them?

  17. #17
    Senior Member kmv2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    My Bikes
    Bianchi circa late 1980s, Surly Cross Check, Kona Blast
    Posts
    695
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    car hydros are not being sold by how little they weigh, and bought separately.
    Ah but they are.

    Usually anything after the master cylinder can be upgraded on a car, to save weight and increase braking performance.

    example: http://www.brembo.com/en/car/Racing/...s/default.aspx

    Even the non-performance aftermarket for replacement brake pads, calipers and discs is huge.

    Sorry to be pedantic You are right though, OEM is OEM.

    Quote Originally Posted by PDX Reborn View Post
    I'm going to miss the times when bicycles, once operated on cables, chains and human power. I can understand the need for hydros on MTB but why do road bikes need them?
    Same reason they add a speed to the rear cassette every few years. Marketing mostly I suppose.
    Last edited by kmv2; 02-19-13 at 02:59 PM.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've read that hydros are better in snow and ice. I've also been told by my bike mentor that I'd find drop bars to be much better than my current flat bars. Hence, my interest. Sounds like wanting both is not in the cards, at least for a while.

    All part of my typical slow and deliberate approach to learning something new - in this case, what my next bike should be.

  19. #19
    Senior Member GregTR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are three viable options on the market today for cable actuated hydraulic brakes on drop bars:
    - TRP Parabox
    - Hope V-twin
    - Trickstuff Doppelmoppel

    There are other garage tuning setups utilizing MTB hydraulic levers and connecting cables to pull on such levers but nothing real for sale.

    I went with the Parabox and I'm extremely happy with the setup. It wasn't overly expensive (everything is relative) and the brake feel is superb. I'm actually looking forward a bit of rain riding just to really test them out. You can see photos of my build over here: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...essions-review

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    pdx
    My Bikes
    2007 carpe diem frame custom build, trek 7.9 frame custom build, custom built chinese carbon fiber road bike, shopping bike
    Posts
    2,683
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PDX Reborn View Post
    I'm going to miss the times when bicycles, once operated on cables, chains and human power. I can understand the need for hydros on MTB but why do road bikes need them?
    i guess you don't ride up and down hills much during the rainy-grimy season in pdx...

  21. #21
    Senior Member PDX Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
    i guess you don't ride up and down hills much during the rainy-grimy season in pdx...
    Unfortunately, yes, now that I'm car free these days. My salmon pads on canti set up does alright in the wet hills, I just have to ride more cautious, as one should anyways in the wet.

  22. #22
    Senior Member grolby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BOSTON BABY
    Posts
    6,799
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PDX Reborn View Post
    I'm going to miss the times when bicycles, once operated on cables, chains and human power. I can understand the need for hydros on MTB but why do road bikes need them?
    I will never understand people who don't think technology should improve over time

  23. #23
    Senior Member PDX Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grolby View Post
    I will never understand people who don't think technology should improve over time
    Have nothing against technology, here. I have plenty of tech gadgets to keep me busy. I just like the idea of a bicycle being simple, much like my trail bikes and their carburators, I can field service them with simple tools if I get stuck 20 miles deep out in the woods. Just sayin

  24. #24
    Senior Member grolby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BOSTON BABY
    Posts
    6,799
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PDX Reborn View Post
    Have nothing against technology, here. I have plenty of tech gadgets to keep me busy. I just like the idea of a bicycle being simple, much like my trail bikes and their carburators, I can field service them with simple tools if I get stuck 20 miles deep out in the woods. Just sayin
    Right, but a fuel-injected bike is less likely to break down 20 miles deep in the woods. That's my point. And even with fancy modern tech, a bicycle is still a lot simpler than a car!

  25. #25
    or tarckeemoon, depending marqueemoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    the pesto of cities
    My Bikes
    Davidson Impulse, Merckx Titanium AX, Bruce Gordon Rock & Road, Cross Check custom build, On-One Il Pomino, Shawver Cycles cross, Zion 737, Mercian Vincitore, Brompton S1L, Charge Juicer
    Posts
    7,017
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For commuting? Nah.

    Might be affordable and awesome in 5-10 years.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •