Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-25-13, 04:33 PM   #1
rtwilli4
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Spec Sirrus - make it lighter!

My wife has a Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012. It is HEAVY (almost 30lbs). She commutes 10 miles round trip and it's a lot of stop and go. She is small, and I know she struggles with how heavy the bike is (to ride, but also to carry). She has talked about getting a relaxed geometry road bike so she'll have better acceleration and be able to carry it easier. We did buy the Spec because of the resale value and could sell it easily, but I'm not convinced that is the answer. The frame is very nice (E5 Aluminum, internal cable routing, smooth welds, carbon fork, etc) and the components still have a lot of life left.

So what are some ideas for dropping weight? The Wheels are Sirrus DRX270 (dunno much about them) and we haven't been impressed. They are heavy and have not stayed true (and she is like 115lb). And the tyres are 35mm I believe, which she does not need since she only rides on reasonably well surfaced roads. So I know that the first option is to get some nice light wheels and 25mm tyres.

Components are a mix of Shimano Acera and Alivio 9spd. They are fine for what she does, but will need upgrading eventually. She'll probably ride through at least one more winter with these, but I'm just curious about what's out there since I'm only into road bike components.

She currently has a triple chainring (48, 36, ??) and 11-32 cassette in rear. She never uses the granny ring. Is it worth making any changes here? Maybe going to a double in front? What does that entail?

Finally, she is interested in getting a different set of handle bars and/or a shorter stem to give her an even more relaxed posture. Thinking that replacing w/ nice aluminum or carbon is a way to drop weight. Same w/ seat post.

Just curious as to what others have done w/ this style bike, and also what is the normal order for upgrading a bike of any kind?

Thanks!
rtwilli4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-13, 09:27 PM   #2
joshuatrio
Senior Member
 
joshuatrio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Central California
Bikes: Giant TCR C1
Posts: 198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Used Sirrus's sell like hotcakes here. I put mine up for sale one day to test the waters and had offers over $400 for a 2011 Sirrus Elite same day. Decided to keep it because there was no backup bike in mind. Resale you can't go wrong - they are kinda like Honda's.

Weight... Starting in 2012 they got heavy. Specialized cheaped out and made the carbon fork standard on the Comp model, where in 2011 the carbon fork was standard on the Elite. Also, 2012 they put larger tires on it and cheaper rims, when in 2011 and older the 700x28c was standard on the Elite model.

Anyhow, dump the wheels for something a little better and upgrade the tires to 700x25. That will be huge. If you can grab a carbon fork for it - do it. I think my 2011 Elite clocks in around 24lbs now.. Not light according to road bike standards, but it works.
joshuatrio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-13, 03:48 PM   #3
rtwilli4
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuatrio View Post
Used Sirrus's sell like hotcakes here. I put mine up for sale one day to test the waters and had offers over $400 for a 2011 Sirrus Elite same day. Decided to keep it because there was no backup bike in mind. Resale you can't go wrong - they are kinda like Honda's.

Weight... Starting in 2012 they got heavy. Specialized cheaped out and made the carbon fork standard on the Comp model, where in 2011 the carbon fork was standard on the Elite. Also, 2012 they put larger tires on it and cheaper rims, when in 2011 and older the 700x28c was standard on the Elite model.

Anyhow, dump the wheels for something a little better and upgrade the tires to 700x25. That will be huge. If you can grab a carbon fork for it - do it. I think my 2011 Elite clocks in around 24lbs now.. Not light according to road bike standards, but it works.

So I went and checked and the bike must be 2011. It is an Elite, and does have a carbon fork and 700x28 tyres (flak jacket). Can't believe those are 28s... they look WAY bigger than the 25s on my Langster.

But I took off her front wheel today and compared it to the front wheel and tyre of my Tarmac (Fulcrum 6, 23mm) and there is a huge difference (don't have a scale). Still think upgrading the wheels and tyres would help... anyone else have any experiences?
rtwilli4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-13, 04:59 PM   #4
joshuatrio
Senior Member
 
joshuatrio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Central California
Bikes: Giant TCR C1
Posts: 198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ahhh forgive me, I was wrong. The 2012 Elites had a carbon fork, and the group set on your wife's bike lines up with 2012 Elite Specs.

Does it really come in around 30lbs? The 2011's stock come in around 25-26. Only real difference I see is the wheels. I have AlexRims AS14's - which have stayed true for over 3000 miles so far.

Only so much you can do to lighten it up without spending a fortune. But tires would be the place to start.

Which Tarmac do you have? That's on my list of bikes to get next.
joshuatrio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-13, 10:40 PM   #5
Fryman22
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Little Rock, AR
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Elite
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have this same bike. Take your tire off the rim, you will be blown away by the weight. My wife has a 2011 Vita Elite with 32c tires, and they are lighter than the nimbus tires that were on mine.

I bought Espoir Elite 25c and road tubes and it is a different bike. I'm a newb, so you might not feel the same, but it took off almost a pound and decreased the rolling resistence as well. It accelerates much quicker and it handles better. Best $90 I've spent in a while.

I never use the granny ring so I'm changing the crank. I have a 105 5750 that I'm going to put on as soon as I get the R770 derailleur, it should be here tomorrow. I got a 5701 rear mech that still allows the 11-32, but I'm putting on an 11-28 to offset the smaller 34 low gear on the compact crank.

Not saying don't get new wheels, but the tires can be done first and cheap.
Fryman22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-13, 11:55 PM   #6
treadtread
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: SF Bay Area
Bikes: 2012 Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 1,254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 2012 base Sirrus (medium) is about 27 pounds - and that is after changing the stock pedals with Shimano SPD M324, which are 1.17 pounds (dunno the weight of the stock pedals). Are you sure the Elite weighs in at 30 pounds? As for reducing weight, tires is the first change you should try.
treadtread is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 02:09 AM   #7
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
You need top do a $/gram-saved.
Weigh the components and get busy with Excel.
Switching to a compact double or even a single may help. Shorter cranks fit better and have less metal. You can cut down seatposts and cut bars narrower, all discarding pesky grammes of metal along the way.
Small riders really should be riding small wheels, ideally 26" MTB for commuting.
Why not switch wheels and let her commute on yours for a while.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 03:07 AM   #8
jsdavis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 1,188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuatrio View Post
Used Sirrus's sell like hotcakes here. I put mine up for sale one day to test the waters and had offers over $400 for a 2011 Sirrus Elite same day. Decided to keep it because there was no backup bike in mind. Resale you can't go wrong - they are kinda like Honda's.

Weight... Starting in 2012 they got heavy. Specialized cheaped out and made the carbon fork standard on the Comp model, where in 2011 the carbon fork was standard on the Elite. Also, 2012 they put larger tires on it and cheaper rims, when in 2011 and older the 700x28c was standard on the Elite model.

Anyhow, dump the wheels for something a little better and upgrade the tires to 700x25. That will be huge. If you can grab a carbon fork for it - do it. I think my 2011 Elite clocks in around 24lbs now.. Not light according to road bike standards, but it works.
Wow, those things are pigs if it is really 30 pounds...my 4130 chromoly Marin Muirwoods 29er is 30 pounds and it's a 19 frame with disc brakes, 700x42, and big suspension corrected steel fork.

Last edited by jsdavis; 06-03-13 at 03:15 AM.
jsdavis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 08:15 AM   #9
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,297
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuatrio View Post
Only so much you can do to lighten it up without spending a fortune. But tires would be the place to start.
This. And only this. OTOH, if the resale on these bikes is so great. Sell it and buy the low end Allez. Unfortunately, the quest for super light weight and relaxed geometry/commuting comfort are somewhat mutually exclusive. As the weight goes down, the assumption is that you want to race. That means aggressive geometry and handling. But, lets be fair. We are talking about a couple of degrees of tube angle or fork rake. For decades the only real difference between a Sirrus and an Allez was the components and paint job. You could achieve the Allez's weight with the Sirrus's presumed comfort by judicious component swapping, but the cost, oh the cost. It could never be worth it. I just test rode a mid 80's Allez at 26lbs. After decades on tandems and commuterized touring rigs in the 40's that thing felt LIGHT!!! Toss the reflectors, every last one, and get some higher end commuting tires with reflectors built in, and you might come up with a bike in the high 20's. Your GF will then have to do upper body work in the gym until that bike feels as light to her as your Tarmac does to you.

H
Leisesturm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 08:52 AM   #10
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 5,478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Unless you're **just** replacing 1 thing - like the tires are particularly heavy, or for some reason it comes with a particularly heavy front fork, etc - it's never cost effective to replace components piece by piece.

It's way cheaper to buy components on an existing bike than it is to buy them piece by piece. You just end up spending more money to make a less-light bike than if you sold it and bought something that's lighter to begin with.

Personally, I would bet you that most of the weight is in the frame, and the only way to significantly drop the weight is the replace the frame anyways.
PaulRivers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 11:49 AM   #11
rtwilli4
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all the replies guys.

As I don't have a scale, I don't know how much the bike really weighs. But it's heavy. I also think the tires and wheels are heavy and the tires are chunky so that hurts acceleration, which is her main complaint. As I'm writing this I've remembered that I have some Spedh 25's that came on another bike, I'll put those on and see what she thinks.

I thought about swapping my wheels onto her bike but mine is brand nee and I don't want her ******' it up!

i've known all along we should just sell it but trying to justify upgrading instead because she doesnt want to continue to make monthly payments (Sirrus is nearly paid off). 0% but still having a payment end is always nice.

Anyone recommend some replacements in the 600 range?
rtwilli4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 11:56 AM   #12
PatrickGSR94
Senior Member
 
PatrickGSR94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Memphis TN area
Bikes: 2011 Felt Z85 (road/commuter), 2006 Marin Pine Mountain (utility), 1995 KHS Alite 1000 (gravel grinder)
Posts: 6,141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
No bathroom scale? I weigh myself on our bathroom scale, then pick up the bike and weigh myself again. Take the difference. My old KHS MTB 3x8 comes in at 28 lbs with pedals and all, and my road bike is about 21.
PatrickGSR94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 02:07 PM   #13
spare_wheel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NA
Bikes: NA
Posts: 4,281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Personally, I would bet you that most of the weight is in the frame, and the only way to significantly drop the weight is the replace the frame anyways.
Nope. The alu in these cheap frames is often relatively light. Probably no more that 4 lb. You should be able to buy cheap <1500 gm machine-made wheels for $300-400. This would shave ~1.4 lbs off the total weight. Better tires and tubes will also drop another ~0.5 lbs. Other quick and dirty weight drops are a cut thomson seat post (~70-100 gms), syntace f109 stem (~60-80 gms). If you are willing to upgrade the drive train, Jenson is selling 6600 ultegra compact for ~$120. Pair this with 105 derailleurs and tiagra shifters for another $150-180 and you would drop another 3-4 lbs.

Quote:
but the cost, oh the cost. It could never be worth it.
In my experience, if you are willing to stockpile discounted components its far cheaper to upgrade than to buy a new bike. Both my commuters are completely upgraded -- only the frames (and one fork) are standard. For example I recently spent ~$220 for new ultegra 6700 compact cranks, new 6700 fd, and a used 6700 rd. Upgrading my worn out 105-based triple to compact was far, far less expensive than buying a similar complete ultegra build. Moreover, the cost of replacing chainrings alone on the triple was ~$120.

Last edited by spare_wheel; 06-03-13 at 02:11 PM.
spare_wheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 04:03 PM   #14
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 5,478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
Nope. The alu in these cheap frames is often relatively light. Probably no more that 4 lb. You should be able to buy cheap <1500 gm machine-made wheels for $300-400. This would shave ~1.4 lbs off the total weight. Better tires and tubes will also drop another ~0.5 lbs. Other quick and dirty weight drops are a cut thomson seat post (~70-100 gms), syntace f109 stem (~60-80 gms). If you are willing to upgrade the drive train, Jenson is selling 6600 ultegra compact for ~$120. Pair this with 105 derailleurs and tiagra shifters for another $150-180 and you would drop another 3-4 lbs.
You got all "nope" then demonstrated exactly why this is a bad idea. After investing $795 into an $800 bike, you've dropped...3-4 pounds?

And that assumes that you have both the skill *and* the tools to change all this out, if you don't have the tools that's more expense.

If the OP could get $500 for the bike, add on your $800, and he's at $1300 - he could simply buy a really solidly spec'd bike for that price.

Heck, for another $350 he could get a full carbon specialized roubaix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
In my experience, if you are willing to stockpile discounted components its far cheaper to upgrade than to buy a new bike. Both my commuters are completely upgraded -- only the frames (and one fork) are standard. For example I recently spent ~$220 for new ultegra 6700 compact cranks, new 6700 fd, and a used 6700 rd. Upgrading my worn out 105-based triple to compact was far, far less expensive than buying a similar complete ultegra build. Moreover, the cost of replacing chainrings alone on the triple was ~$120.
The cost of replacing components that are worn out and you have to replace anyways is dramatically different than the cost of replacing working existing components just to drop weight. I'm not sure what you're trying to say in the last part about chainrings - the fact that replacement chain rings was $120 supports my point about replacing components being very expensive. Are you saying to buy used chainrings? I mean...I guess maybe it's possible to do that without getting something that's worn out...

The OP posted after I posted about acceleration being the main complaint. If it is, maybe putting new tires on the bike will help - or replacing the wheels. If the OP has the knowledge and tools to switch wheels from his bike, he could put his wheels on her bike then let her ride it once or twice and see if it made a difference.
PaulRivers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 04:26 PM   #15
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 19,697
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
More Titanium parts to replace the steel ones,, Sew-ups can use a lighter rim
because the rim does not have to resist internal pressures of 100 + psi Inflation.. ,
on the tire bead wanting to expand it.. outward
Though rims like Mavic Open Pro and Kevlar bead 23~25mm tires get close..
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-13, 06:42 AM   #16
PatrickGSR94
Senior Member
 
PatrickGSR94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Memphis TN area
Bikes: 2011 Felt Z85 (road/commuter), 2006 Marin Pine Mountain (utility), 1995 KHS Alite 1000 (gravel grinder)
Posts: 6,141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Vuelta Corsa Lite road wheelsets are $250 at Nashbar and are advertised to be just 1,570 grams. I want a set for my Felt to replace the OEM Mavic CXP 22's which weigh in at well over 2 kg.
PatrickGSR94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-13, 11:13 AM   #17
spare_wheel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NA
Bikes: NA
Posts: 4,281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
You got all "nope" then demonstrated exactly why this is a bad idea. After investing $795 into an $800 bike, you've dropped...3-4 pounds?
With an upgrade to ultegra compact, 1500 gm wheels, 100 gm syntace stem, and 180 gm cut thomson, that alu hybrid is going to drop a heck of a lot more than 3-4 lbs.


Quote:
full carbon specialized roubaix.
LOL!

9 speed sora drive train (the deore of the road).
Boat anchor chinese wheels.
Boat anchor chinese stem.
Boat anchor chinese seat post.


vs

Full ultegra drive train.
German stem with titanium bolts that is widely regarded as one of the finest in the world.
American seat post that comes with a beige bag that is simply awesome!!!!!
Something like the nashbar's mentioned above which are at least a notch above the wheels that come standard on the ~$1750 roubaix compact.

Last edited by spare_wheel; 06-04-13 at 11:20 AM.
spare_wheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-13, 12:16 PM   #18
rtwilli4
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well she's had a ride with my Fulcrum 6s and says there is a big difference. I'm thinking I'll get her some new 25 tires right away and eventually i'll upgrade my wheels and give her the Fulcrums.

She'll have to ride through one more winter on the current drive train but maybe next summer we'll look at replacing the rings and cranks.
rtwilli4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-13, 01:13 PM   #19
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Bikes: 2013 Kona Jake, 2015 Kona Jake the Snake, 2008 Kona Major Jake, 2013 Kona Jake the Snake, 2006 Kona Kula, 2012 Ridley Excalibur, 2001 LeMond Buenos Aires, 1984 Pinarello Gran Turismo, 1982 Trek 614, 1979 Austro-Daimler, 1974 Steyr Clubman
Posts: 8,744
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Often the seatpost and handlebars are a really cheap place to save weight. You could pull those off and weigh them then compare to some specs on after market parts. That crankset and bottom bracket is also likely a huge piece of the weight.

The trouble with trimming bike weight is that the weight is usually distributed all over the bike. You probably are in a good place with the frame and fork though. I would expect that you could get that down to around 23 pounds without and extremely high-end parts.
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:41 AM.