Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Furthermore, the thief would have destroyed the value of the bike (the rear wheel is going to be the majority of the bike's value), it would not be rideable and therefore, not sellable quickly.
if the bike has nice components, who cares if it can be ridden after it's stolen? otherwise, there's always a bike nearby with an unsecured rear wheel.

what concerns me more than theft, in regards to the sheldon brown locking method, is having my rear wheel, and possibly the frame, destroyed by someone TRYING to steal the bike. even if it's not that easy to defeat, it still LOOKS easy.

Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
With portable grinding tools, a well equipped thief is not going to have much trouble with any lock these days. But that's a pretty motivated thief and "professional" thief.

Another piece that makes sense is to use two locks - a U lock and a cable lock. That requires two different sets of tools to defeat.
why do people still think that "breaking two locks requires two tools"? your previous sentence proves that to be wrong.

two locks does take more time to defeat than one lock (and to that extent provides good deterrent value), but cable-locks are still damn-near useless. a solid U-lock and a good, thick CHAIN... now we're talking.

Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Our bikes are just a royal PITA to any thief who wants to rip a bike off. There are much, much easier and more profitable targets. Based on experience, I'm pretty confident in our methodology.
always park next to a more desirable bike with a crappier lock (or a good lock that's not used properly)