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  1. #1
    tgt
    tgt is offline
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    Bianchi Sempre Pro with a pannier rack?

    I recently bought a Bianchi Sempre Pro and am very happy with it.

    However, I am also a commuter and would like to replace my old commuting bike. There are pannier racks out there that can be fitted to a road bike with no rack mounts (e.g. http://www.axiomgear.com/products/ge...iner-road-dlx/) but is the Sempre Pro strong enough to carry a pannier bag on a daily basis that could range between 10kg to 40 kg?


    I have heard positive things mentioned about the construction of the Sempre Pro and how it is stronger than most other carbon bikes such as on this website http://www.competitivecyclist.com/bi...mpre-pro-frame


    The paragraph below is from this site:


    "Bianchi has incorporated a few proprietary construction methods to the Sempre's carbon design. For one, it's been made stronger by using Bianchi's Carbon NanoTube technology. This process involves adding nano-scaled particles to the resin. By doing so, the particles reduce the microcopic gaps between the resin and the fibers of the carbon. Ultimately, this increases the strength and fracture-resistance by 49% compared to using standard epoxy resin systems."



    But does that make the Sempre Pro able to carry a potentially heavy pannier rack?


    Please note that I usually cycle on a flat bike path for about 2 hours each day.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Beats the heck out of me but I were commuting on a nice race bike, I'd leave as much stuff as possible at work and then use a messenger bag or a backpack. Keep the bike simple and call it a day. It also sounds like it might be N+1 time; a vintage old school racing or sports touring bike with eyelets would probably make a better commuter. But sometimes life is too short not to ride exactly the bike you want to ride in exactly the way you want to. So go for it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    +1 for backpack.
    Clip on and off fenders for rain, OK. Rack...umm...free yourself and feel some speed with the new bike.

  4. #4
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    Revelate Design bags don't require racks, it's an option to consider.

  5. #5
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    N+1, I'd get a second bike and shop from the rack mount fittings forward.

    though If your fork will accept mudguards, and has mountings for them, tip eyelets...I dont see such [black on black picture didn't help]

    NB There are QR skewer supported racks . this one goes on front,
    http://www.bikebagshop.com/omm-cold-...ck-p-1127.html

    a clever use of rubber lined P clamps and a significant mount of tape
    around your fork blades and it Can work. I've seen some kludges on CF forks
    of Bike tourists setups, as they cycle down the Oregon coast..

    a front rack is also nice.. I have 2 bikes that front load , but have no rear rack..

    Reduce.. Carry the stuff in a thumb drive instead of hauling the laptop
    Last edited by fietsbob; 12-20-13 at 02:11 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member blakcloud's Avatar
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    40 kilograms and two hours a day? That is a load for a cargo bike or trailer. If you go the back pack route even 10 kilos will be a heavy load. I think another bike is in order or maybe rethink how much you carry to work.

  7. #7
    Thunder Whisperer no1mad's Avatar
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    I wouldn't risk it with 40 kgs...

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Missed that, 88 pounds , +1 on the trailer .. I tried a 1 wheel BoB , they are often towed by bike tourists
    some behind Road bikes , riding down the Coast.

    for Utility I prefer 2 wheel trailers.. many use the left rear axle QR end to mount the hitch.

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