Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How feasible would be to mount and unmount my bike?

    Hello everyone!

    I went yesterday to pick up my Allez frame from the LBS. It's been sitting there for almost a year now, as I've been having physical therapy on my hands and wrists -to alleviate injuries caused by a delivery guy in a motorcycle who jumped onto the sidewalk and charged against me last year, while I was riding on my previous commuter bike-.

    I've been debating myself for a long time as to whether I should complete this new build -or not, and move on from biking (hence the brief story above), and one of my main concerns is about how feasible it would be to dismount the two wheels and put them on a bag like this, then be allowed to enter whatever mall/place with the rest of the bike still assembled. The reason for that is my previous bike was stolen in a parking lot (with a 'supposed' security guard), so I won't even consider completing the bike if I cannot get into places with it on my hands (NEVER again leave it out of my sight).

    How easy/difficult is it to dismount the wheels on a road bike?
    Does it take too long, would some component wear out prematurely from doing it on a daily basis?

    I'm guessing the front wheel is fairly simple; perhaps the back wheel is more difficult, with the cassette and the chain?
    I'd be trying to make a light bike (without it ending up prohibitively expensive) so I can easily carry the bike indoors with me, whenever required, and not make it as attractive for thieves (I'm going for a stealth build). The two components I have so far:

    Specialized Allez E5 OSBB Frameset:


    and

    Mavic Aksium wheels


    I plan on getting and Ultegra 6800 group and maybe exchange the stock seat post for a lighter one. Is it too hard (or a bad idea) to dismount the brakes and the rear wheel whenever I have to enter some store or mall? The guys at the LBS say I could be starting a 'thing' locally..


    Any opinions are much appreciated!
    Last edited by Stix Zadinia; 01-17-14 at 08:58 PM.
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  2. #2
    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    North County San Diego
    Posts
    1,586
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know...if it came down to worrying about feeling like I needed to remove the wheels every time I entered a building I'd probably be looking for a bike I didn't care much for. It's not difficult to remove them, just a pain if you ask me, especially combined with then carrying them around. Besides that, if somebody really wants that bike they're going to steal it with or without wheels.

    Nice looking frame by the way

  3. #3
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My plan would be to pack the wheels on a bag, and carry the rest of the bike on the other hand, when entering some indoors place. If they refuse then I would look for another place to eat, go to the bathroom, shop around etc.
    Thieves would have to try and take it from me while I'm riding it. I'd plan my routes more carefully (used to go around everywhere on my previous bike and lock it on parking lots, cheaper mtb), and I already have some potent pepper spray to carry with me.

    THanks!
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  4. #4
    apocryphal sobriquet J.C. Koto's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Star City, NE
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker "The Truckerino"
    Posts
    902
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I were in your position I'd either carry the bike inside assembled or forget about that frame and get a folding bike instead.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,637
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by J.C. Koto View Post
    If I were in your position I'd either carry the bike inside assembled or forget about that frame and get a folding bike instead.
    Surely this. Especially the last. My folding bike was in daily use back in NYC but out here on the west coast there is much less need for a bike that folds. Much less need, but there are still quite a few occasions when it comes in very handy. Store personnel don't know or care about the trauma's in your past. But many are surprisingly tolerant of fully assembled bicycles on their premises. Even when it is posted otherwise.

    H

  6. #6
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
    Posts
    4,238
    Mentioned
    58 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get a folding bike, like a Brompton, that folds down to shoulder bag size in seconds.

    Your idea will have you a slave to the bike and its assembly and disassembly. Plus, even a frame with detached wheels is very inconvenient to carry around, the chain will get you dirty, eventually the derailleur or hanger will get bent, etc. To safely and conveniently carry a disassembled road bike, you need a carrying case , and that's hard to carry on the bike.
    Your signature contains too many lines and must be shortened. You may only have up to 2 line(s). Long text may have been implicitly wrapped, causing it to be

  7. #7
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I don't like folding bikes at all, nor things with motors on them. When I bought this frame I was all enthusiastic, watching Tour De France and whatnot. I've had over a year to think more about my hands (I rely heavily on them being healthy for working), the dangers of going alongside cars (I don't think going up and down sidewalks would be as practical on this bike as in the previous mtb), the money aspect, possibility of theft, etc.

    Long story short, it has come to me being able to either build this one, or give up cycling.. well, at least for the time being.

    Before I bought the frame the other option I was considering was a light mtb. But those come quite expensive, at least locally (even more than this one) and above all, I think it would prove much more difficulty trying to sneak one of those into a mall The prospect of going faster and also more portability and less fatigue got me into getting this frame.. I'm weighing in the options; all your input is really appreciated!
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  8. #8
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fwiw (I don't think I mentioned it before in the thread) my mtb got stolen on a parking lot last year: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...%28?highlight=

    Hence why I won't end up getting anything that requires a lock/leaving it outside anymore.
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  9. #9
    apocryphal sobriquet J.C. Koto's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Star City, NE
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker "The Truckerino"
    Posts
    902
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I hope you find something that works out for you. Good luck

  10. #10
    Senior Member blakcloud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    My Bikes
    Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Brompton S3L, Masi Adventure Bike (Gravel Grinder)
    Posts
    528
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stix Zadinia View Post
    Long story short, it has come to me being able to either build this one, or give up cycling.. well, at least for the time being.
    It doesn't have to be an either or position. There is variability and other solutions. Carrying the bike around will be impractical at best. BTW I have a Brompton that I carry into stores the few times I have ridden it and the bike gets heavy fast.

    Maybe the Specialized isn't the best bike for your commuting needs?

  11. #11
    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    North County San Diego
    Posts
    1,586
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stix Zadinia View Post
    My plan would be to pack the wheels on a bag, and carry the rest of the bike on the other hand, when entering some indoors place. If they refuse then I would look for another place to eat, go to the bathroom, shop around etc.
    Thieves would have to try and take it from me while I'm riding it. I'd plan my routes more carefully (used to go around everywhere on my previous bike and lock it on parking lots, cheaper mtb), and I already have some potent pepper spray to carry with me.

    THanks!
    I see what you mean now. Rear wheel removal is not difficult but I like to have the bike on a stand or upside down for putting it back on. You may also find you may need to grab the chain which will get your hands messy.

    Anyway, I think your plan isn't very practical but if you think it will work, go for it.

  12. #12
    Senior Member gregjones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    West Georgia
    My Bikes
    K2 Mod 5.0 Roadie, Fuji Commuter
    Posts
    2,263
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So, in the end we wind up with yet another reason not to ride on sidewalks.

    You might get hit by a motorcycle.
    Disclaimer: It's just an opinion that I have. It works for me. I am not the forum "Police (Of Anything)". Others may disagree. And....YMMV.
    Don't use up any brain cells thinking that I care, you don't like anything anyway.

    Click PR Logo
    PedalRoom

  13. #13
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    CID
    My Bikes
    1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX
    Posts
    8,776
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
    So, in the end we wind up with yet another reason not to ride on sidewalks.

    You might get hit by a motorcycle.
    +1. If Stix weren't a regular poster, I'd assume he was trolling: "I'm thinking about buying this bike and taking it apart to bring inside buildings." WTF?
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  14. #14
    PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes dynaryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    dropped and lost in Washington DC
    Posts
    6,138
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cheaper bike,better locks,or folding bike.

    Taking a full size bike apart and carrying it around is going to get old quick.

    C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport/Qualifier,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bay Area, Calif.
    Posts
    4,985
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's not hard to remove and reinstall the wheels - I do that regularly when transporting my road bike in the trunk of my car. But carrying around both the wheels and the frame would get to be rather cumbersome. One problem with carrying the frame is that the chain is likely to get tangled or to come off the chain ring and then be hanging down. Some frames have a little hook on the inside of the drive-side chainstay for holding the chain when the rear wheel is removed - if yours lacks such a device it should be possible to make a clamp-on version. I'd recommend some such method to keep the chain from getting loose and then tangled if you'll be carrying the frame around sans rear wheel.

    But I agree with comments above that you're likely to get tired of the aggravation of carrying wheels and frame around and would instead suggest some investment in good quality locks. They don't have to be theft-proof (nothing is), just enough of a deterrent that the thief will opt for someone else's bike that's easier to steal.

  16. #16
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,541
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +11, Seems you are describing a situation where a Folding Bike would be so much better.


    .. than a race type bike , such as you show.

    N+1, save the fancy road bike for just riding in the countryside.


    Well, I don't like folding bikes at all
    Thats too bad, good luck with making what you do like, work for you .. ..


    How easy/difficult is it to dismount the wheels on a road bike?
    it is made simple for replacing a punctured tire and wheel with another ,
    as you may see looking at the pro races . But ..
    the derailleur is vulnerable , chain slack dangles and makes things it touches

    dirty .. and all that if there is no wheel in the rear dropout.. .

    Removing front only, is less of an issue ,
    and often people with a big U lock take the front wheel off so they can lock it,
    the frame and the rear wheel to a post.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 01-20-14 at 03:22 PM.

  17. #17
    rugged individualist wphamilton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA
    My Bikes
    Nashbar Road
    Posts
    6,493
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You're not seriously suggesting taking the wheels off and carrying them around on supermarket runs and trips to the mall? Wont that scream "scavenge me" with the frame locked up to the rack? Or would you carry the frame around also?

    I think I'd buy a cheap wheelset ($150 or so) and use it and a good lock for the utility cycling, and switch out for the more serious rides.

  18. #18
    Local 1212 @work's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Moser Track, Colnago Dream Track, Merckx Roadie and Rossin Bar Bike
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
    Taking a full size bike apart and carrying it around is going to get old quick.
    It'll get old real quick let alone time consuming and annoying.

    Quote Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
    You're not seriously suggesting taking the wheels off and carrying them around on supermarket runs and trips to the mall? Wont that scream "scavenge me" with the frame locked up to the rack? Or would you carry the frame around also?

    I think I'd buy a cheap wheelset ($150 or so) and use it and a good lock for the utility cycling, and switch out for the more serious rides.
    +1
    Also, some locking skewers (front/rear/seatpost) would be the next best thing along with a fahgettaboudit chain imho. Or just get a Brompton and save yourself the trouble of doing all this. Brompton's are the jam!

  19. #19
    Senior Member megalowmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    North County San Diego
    Posts
    1,586
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
    You're not seriously suggesting taking the wheels off and carrying them around on supermarket runs and trips to the mall? Wont that scream "scavenge me" with the frame locked up to the rack? Or would you carry the frame around also?

    I think I'd buy a cheap wheelset ($150 or so) and use it and a good lock for the utility cycling, and switch out for the more serious rides.
    He's actually talking about carrying around the entire bike, frame and all, just with the wheels removed and in the bag. It wasn't clear to me either at first.

  20. #20
    Local 1212 @work's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Moser Track, Colnago Dream Track, Merckx Roadie and Rossin Bar Bike
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fwiw, that Allez and wheelset is too nice to be locking up. Ever consider an older, steel road frame with a descent groupset for locking up?

  21. #21
    Local 1212 @work's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Moser Track, Colnago Dream Track, Merckx Roadie and Rossin Bar Bike
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by megalowmatt View Post
    He's actually talking about carrying around the entire bike, frame and all, just with the wheels removed and in the bag. It wasn't clear to me either at first.
    That sounds miserable.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by megalowmatt View Post
    He's actually talking about carrying around the entire bike, frame and all, just with the wheels removed and in the bag. It wasn't clear to me either at first.
    Yes exactly. I would have to do that once each day, perhaps even twice, sometime.

    Thanks everyone for your replies. I'm aware it would be a nuisance, I just want to check how much you think it would be.

    I would not consider getting a heavier/cheaper bike (as I was burning up too much calories on a mtb anyway); I bought the Allez because I thought upgrading to a road bike would help me move faster, make for an even more fun ride, and perhaps also become a bit less fatigued, as I work in different places each day. I always have the alternative of taking buses/cabs, for me the bike is simply a much nicer way to get around. The concept of a beater doesn't appeal to me much, and regardless of the price of a bike, I'm not willing to ever leave another one locked up unattended, and offer thieves a 'challenge'.. Once was enough, lesson learned.

    The folding bike is logically the practical alternative for me, unfortunately I don't care for the look in those at all. I may have to end up selling the parts I already have (along with the new lights, pedals, etc I had for it) and give up.. for now I guess I'll just keep pondering about it more.
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  23. #23
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
    It's not hard to remove and reinstall the wheels - I do that regularly when transporting my road bike in the trunk of my car. But carrying around both the wheels and the frame would get to be rather cumbersome. One problem with carrying the frame is that the chain is likely to get tangled or to come off the chain ring and then be hanging down. Some frames have a little hook on the inside of the drive-side chainstay for holding the chain when the rear wheel is removed - if yours lacks such a device it should be possible to make a clamp-on version. I'd recommend some such method to keep the chain from getting loose and then tangled if you'll be carrying the frame around sans rear wheel.

    But I agree with comments above that you're likely to get tired of the aggravation of carrying wheels and frame around and would instead suggest some investment in good quality locks. They don't have to be theft-proof (nothing is), just enough of a deterrent that the thief will opt for someone else's bike that's easier to steal.
    For handling the chain I guess I could get gloves -other that the ones I ride in. The frame does have the small hook you mention I believe, but in any case, I think Specialized also sells them separately.
    If I were to get locks I'd need to secure at least both wheels and the frame, the seat, and the handlebars. That alone would amount to some 4 or 5 locks (which would defeat the purpose of a light bike altogether I think), and yet other parts -such as the drive train- would still be totally exposed.
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  24. #24
    Senior Member Stix Zadinia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
    So, in the end we wind up with yet another reason not to ride on sidewalks.

    You might get hit by a motorcycle.
    Well actually it's more like dedicated bike paths around the city, with a smaller lane for pedestrians on the side. From time to time some motorcyclist decides it's a good idea to cross or even go through these bicycle lanes located by the sidewalks, instead of going through regular traffic jams on the street.
    A couple months after the incident with the motorcyclist, another one charged at me on the same spot exactly, only this time, I was a pedestrian. Might have been the same guy, dunno though.
    Last edited by Stix Zadinia; 01-19-14 at 09:15 PM.
    Why does the wind always blow cold, and always the wrong way? -Pain

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, last summer I became known to the staff of various supermarkets and shops around my neighbourhood as the guy who wheels his bike around the store. When it's not pouring rain here I ride what for me is a very nice carbon race bike, although it doesn't even rate a glance compared to high end machines I see all over the place in my city; but I'd be heartbroken if it were stolen or scavenged for parts, and that certainly is a thing that happens around here. As a result, if I'm just popping into a shop to grab a few things, I wheel the bike around with me. It's a hassle, to be sure, and the shop staff aren't always thrilled, but the way I see it I'm doing nothing more problematic than wheeling a shopping cart around. So far nobody's made a real issue out of it, my bike remains unpoached, and my peace of mind is intact - plus I don't have to carry a heavy lock. That's the approach I'd recommend.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •