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-   -   The Surly Straggler looks like it would be an excellent commuter (http://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/934015-surly-straggler-looks-like-would-excellent-commuter.html)

Solid_Spoke 02-12-14 08:55 PM

The Surly Straggler looks like it would be an excellent commuter
 
I saw my first Straggler in the flesh the other day (a shiny purple one). A nice bike! I love the tires. Anyone use one for commuting? How are the dropouts working for you? I read on MTBR a few accounts of wheels slipping...

peterw_diy 02-13-14 03:56 PM

If you like the Straggler, you should see what Soma has in store for this summer -- the Wolverine. Disc brakes, sliding dropouts, belt-drive-ready, and the fork end appears to be angled the right way for helping keep the hub in place (unlike Surly's disc forks).

fietsbob 02-13-14 04:38 PM

I see Paragon type rear Dropouts bolted onto the rear stay to come open for the belt

http://urbanvelo.org/wordpress/wp-co...8be63ccb_b.jpg

Other than that .. < I have to guess > they used the fork dropouts flipped to open forward?

Andy_K 02-13-14 04:41 PM

Both of them seem to sacrifice the practicality of a tall head tube for the aesthetics of a flat top tube.

peterw_diy 02-13-14 05:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy_K (Post 16493718)
Both of them seem to sacrifice the practicality of a tall head tube for the aesthetics of a flat top tube.

Yep. I've never wanted a taller HT on my CC, but, yes, they do. Maybe you'd prefer a Van Dessel WTF or Specialized AWOL.

alan s 02-14-14 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peterw_diy (Post 16493595)
If you like the Straggler, you should see what Soma has in store for this summer -- the Wolverine. Disc brakes, sliding dropouts, belt-drive-ready, and the fork end appears to be angled the right way for helping keep the hub in place (unlike Surly's disc forks).

What Surly disc forks are you referring to? I have a Troll disc fork, and it looks like a pretty standard design.

blakcloud 02-14-14 05:15 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by alan s (Post 16496334)
What Surly disc forks are you referring to? I have a Troll disc fork, and it looks like a pretty standard design.

I have never seen a Troll in person but every photo I have seen shows a standard fork and not the new style with forward facing dropouts at peterw_diy alludes to.

Here is an example of Salsa's fork. http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=364402 Notice the forward facing dropouts to counteract the forces from the disk brake pulling the front wheel out.

alan s 02-15-14 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blakcloud (Post 16496843)
I have never seen a Troll in person but every photo I have seen shows a standard fork and not the new style with forward facing dropouts at peterw_diy alludes to.

Here is an example of Salsa's fork. http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=364402 Notice the forward facing dropouts to counteract the forces from the disk brake pulling the front wheel out.

Not following you on this...the brake pulls the wheel up into the dropouts, so angling forward wouldn't make a difference. Might be easier to get the wheel in, perhaps.

palu 02-15-14 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alan s (Post 16497755)
Not following you on this...the brake pulls the wheel up into the dropouts, so angling forward wouldn't make a difference. Might be easier to get the wheel in, perhaps.

I would think the way the disc calipers are mounted, it would cause the wheel to move down and back. This is why a lot of disc forks now have forward facing dropouts.

EDIT: Just wanted to add that I have not had issues with the Surly dropouts that face down. I use Shimano skewers and tighten them up pretty good.

blakcloud 02-15-14 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alan s (Post 16497755)
Not following you on this...the brake pulls the wheel up into the dropouts, so angling forward wouldn't make a difference. Might be easier to get the wheel in, perhaps.

This is an old article but the basic physics are there for you to make your own decision. This is a problem that has been know for a while. Look at Whiskey disk forks, Enve disk forks, there is a reason they are using a forward facing dropout.

With that said, it isn't like I am going to run out and buy a new fork for my Trek Portland because of the dropout. Though, my next bike if is a disk equipped bike will have the forward facing drop out. I have been going to NAHBS every year and you will see most builders using the new style of fork dropouts for disk brakes.

dynaryder 02-15-14 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blakcloud (Post 16497803)
This is an old article but the basic physics are there for you to make your own decision.

I remember that. I've never had an issue with any of my bikes,and have never known anyone who had. I don't think this is really an issue beyond user error. Remember lawyer lips were added because of user error.

alan s 02-15-14 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dynaryder (Post 16498950)
I remember that. I've never had an issue with any of my bikes,and have never known anyone who had. I don't think this is really an issue beyond user error. Remember lawyer lips were added because of user error.

Never had any issues with the QR loosening up, but guess that's why MTBers use thru bolts, rather than QR. For the average commuter, not likely to ever be a problem.

grolby 02-17-14 01:54 PM

My Cross-Check is an excellent commuter, the Straggler is basically a disc Cross-Check. Sounds good to me.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy_K (Post 16493718)
Both of them seem to sacrifice the practicality of a tall head tube for the aesthetics of a flat top tube.

To each their own. The C-C/Straggler head tube is not a sacrifice for me, I need a short head tube to get my fit right. There are plenty of other bikes out there with tall head tubes.

grolby 02-17-14 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alan s (Post 16499581)
Never had any issues with the QR loosening up, but guess that's why MTBers use thru bolts, rather than QR. For the average commuter, not likely to ever be a problem.

Thru-axles do prevent wheel ejection, but a bigger reason for their adoption on non-downhill or freeride bikes is a stiffer, more consistent alignment of the front wheel. This is really important with the small clearances of disc brakes. Rotor alignment is perfect every time with a thru-axle, without one there's enough wiggle in a conventional QR setup to get rotor rub. The stiffness has an added bonus in improved steering precision, but that's less of a big deal.

fietsbob 02-17-14 02:01 PM

thru axles go with the suspension fork.. as the axle and the arch at the top is all that there is ,

to stabilize the front wheel . on the lower sliding section ..


Quote:

Not following you on this...>the brake pulls the wheel up into the dropouts,< so angling forward wouldn't make a difference. Might be easier to get the wheel in, perhaps.
It's Physics..
actually, it's only true of a disc-brake caliper put on the front of the right fork blade,
but the conventional location is for both F&R to be on the left side ..

SO, NB when you apply the brake, the disc brake pad becomes a new Torque Center

with that as the new axis , a loose skewer and the axle swings around that center,
and out of a down facing dropout..

thats why there is a significant recess pocket and the lawyer's lips on disc brake fork tips.

carlotta 02-17-14 02:13 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here's mine in commuter mode... I've had it a couple months and it is an excellent commuter thus far.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=364728
Still need to address the rear rack situation (moved parts from my old Cross Check and the non-disc-specific rack won't fit around the caliper so I'm running it on the upper mounts which makes it sit too high/look funny/come very, very, very close to my heels), the front fender went on since this pic and it's currently sporting Marathon Winters.

I haven't had any trouble with hub slippage in the fork, but have had the rear one slip a few times, although once I get it tight it stays put. Overall, it rides really smooth and has been a nice upgrade from the Cross Check. I've got full hydro discs on it and they've been great in the muck/melt/general commuting mess compared to the rim brakes on the old Cross Check (plus really, really fun with studs on the ice :)).


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