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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 04-25-14, 01:02 PM   #26
fietsbob 
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Trek is the Main Brand sold here , Felt another , Raleigh.. Redline Etc, Etc.

yea $1000. then you start getting remote lockouts on suspension forks.
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Old 04-25-14, 01:41 PM   #27
sportsfan266
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This review below from Outslide Online claimed the Sirrus has a very long and tall (20-degree) stem that keeps you upright in town, but slows you up on longer road leisure rides. Sirrus owners, would you agree? This bike will be used by us 80% for short commuting/around town errands and 20% for leisure road rides on weekends (not for speed), so probably not relevant for us.
mountainwalker, I've had the Sirrus Sport (one level above the base model) for about a month and a half and it's definitely a bike that keeps you upright. I commute 10-15 miles each way to work in an urban area with a bunch of potholes/manholes/debris and it's held up fine - can take it off road on some gravel roads but I wouldn't recommend anything further). The seat gets a little uncomfortable after a long ride but you could easily replace it if you wish. I've been averaging about 14 mph on the Sirrus but I'm a little out of shape (fastest I've gotten is 20 mph with a tailwind). Either way I wouldn't expect you to get the same speeds as a road bike. If you are riding short distances and for leisure (not speed) then the Sirrus/Vita would be perfect for you.

I agree though with a comment above to pick the local bike store over the bike. Find the LBS in your area that has a good reputation and that you feel has the best customer service and pick your bike based on what that store carries. You're gonna be in there pretty often as a new bike owner with any problems that may come up so you want to make sure you like the people you're dealing with. I picked the Sirrus because I heard people had bad experiences with the Trek store in-town while the store that sells Specialized bikes knows who I am, makes great recommendations and seems to do a good job with customer service/repairs with bikes. Bikes like the Trek 7.2 FX and Sirrus are going to be pretty similar for entry-level bikes so the LBS is what makes the difference here.
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Old 04-29-14, 06:34 PM   #28
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I have a Sirrus Elite that I use for commuting and a Roubaix Pro that I use for fun and love both. The Sirrus is a solid all around bike and came with 28 mm tires which I have since swapped out with 25 mm Armadillo's that were donated by a friend. I also swapped out the 11-32 cassette with a 12-23 unit to allow me to maintain a reasonably constant cadence while riding. My Roubaix has a compact double and a 12-27 which works pretty well and the triple with a 26 tooth chain ring up front has worked well getting me pretty much anywhere that I am willing to commute to. Besides that, it only takes like 10 minutes to swap cassettes so the best of both worlds. Regarding the riding position, you can adjust the bike to allow a more aggressive riding position by adjusting the shims on the steering tube or on the stem. I haven't really fiddled with either on this bike, but the option is there. The bike has full fenders front and rear and enough lights to give a blind man a headache. It's not a Roubaix for sure, but it is light enough (~24 lbs) to carry up a flight or two of stairs if needed and can accept front and rear racks, if desired. It's not a racer by any means, rather is a solid fitness or commuting platform.
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Old 06-05-14, 12:00 PM   #29
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Fast Commuter/Weekend Fitness Bike w/Carbon Fork Recommendations?

So after looking around a bit and doing some research, I'm definitely gravitating toward faster bikes that will work well as a fast commuter and weekend fitness bike. 700c wheels (not super thick so they aren't too slow and not super thin so they have too harsh a ride), flat handle bars with a riding position upright slightly tilted forward, preferably a carbon fork for road shock dampening, and a frame that will take a rear rack and fenders. I'm wondering which bikes in this class (with front carbon fork) are the best value. One I found was the Fuji Absolute 1.4 Fuji Absolute 1.4 Flat Bar Road Bike - 2013 - Fitness Bikes (I nixed the 1.3 model as it has fewer speeds). Carbon fork and on sale for $550. What other bikes are out there in this class and rough price point? For a Specialized Sirrus, you need to jump to an Elite to get the carbon fork, and MSRP is $820 and I haven't been able to find them at a good sale price. From what I can tell, Trek and Specialized and I'm certain other large bike companies can charge more due to strong brand and advertising. Don't get me wrong - I think they make some great bikes - I've loved Specialized mountain bikes.
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Old 06-06-14, 11:22 AM   #30
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Bikes Direct Motobecane Cafe Sprint (like Fuji Absolute 1.4)? Anyone try BD?

A friend of a friend sent me a link to Bikes Direct - I was surprised to find their Motobecane Cafe Sprint, which has specs similar to a Fuji Absolute 1.4, with a carbon fork, flat bars and 700c wheels and what look like decent components, for only $499, with no tax and free shipping. The Fuji Absolute 1.4 was selling in a local Performance Bike for $550 plus tax = total about $600. That's incredible that Bike Direct can sell a bike of that level for $499 total. I think to have similar specs on a Specialized Sirrus at a local LFS would run $820 + tax and that's probably true for Trek as well. They have a bike one level up called the Motobecane Cafe Sprint Disc Save up to 60% off new Hybrid Bikes Motobecane Cafe Sprint for $799 and a full carbon Cafe Century Save up to 60% off new Hybrid Bicycles | Road Bikes Cafe Century PRO for $895 total. I'm pretty sure at these prices that you probably have to assemble the bike.

Has anyone ridden these bikes or heard anything about Bikes Direct? How's the quality of their bikes, carbon components and frames and customer service?

I should point out that we have fantastic bike mechanics in a nearby shop, and whether you purchase from them or not they will service your bike for the same cost (only difference being that on a new bike from them I think you get free tuning for a few months).
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Old 06-06-14, 11:48 AM   #31
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I should point out that we have fantastic bike mechanics in a nearby shop, and whether you purchase from them or not they will service your bike for the same cost (only difference being that on a new bike from them I think you get free tuning for a few months).
You are price sensitive and that "only difference" is a giant difference. As fietsbob suggested, almost 15 posts ago, you need to "Pick The Bike Shop First , then get a bike There."

Bikes Direct is best left to those who can, or want to rapidly learn how to work on their own bike. The reason "you get free tunings for a few months" is because that's when a bike is FAR most likely to need it. You're looking at eating up your little bit of savings very fast when you start adjusting this and adjusting that. Cables stretch, parts settle in.

If you can't do it yourself then you are going to pay. Either up front or a piece at a time.
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Old 06-06-14, 12:17 PM   #32
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Have you looked into the Specialized Crosstrail and Ariel?
I'll second this suggestion. Also, as far as the Crosstrail goes, the front suspension does have a lock-out... And the Ariel is just the women's version of the Crosstrail; essentially the same quality and components.
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Old 06-06-14, 12:18 PM   #33
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I probably look at something like the Raleigh Clubman. An all-round bike that rides fast but doesn't make you feel like you have to compete in the Tour De France.
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