Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 101 to 104 of 104
  1. #101
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Singapore
    My Bikes
    Oyama East Village
    Posts
    264
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Wheel weight does count more than frame or payload weight because wheels undergo angular (rotational) acceleration, along with the same linear acceleration as the rest of the bike. Without going into a detailed explanation (available here or in any HS physics textbook) we can say that weight at the tread of the tire would count double vs frame weight, while the multiplier would decrease to near zero as we moved in toward the hub. I factored that (generously) when I doubled the weight of the tires in my rough example earlier.

    As for the premise that weight in one part of the bike must be overcome first before other places count, that makes no sense at all.

    So we agree that wheels count more, but we need to maintain some perspective. If we were talking about road bikes ridden long stretches on open roads, or engaged in alpine climbing, things like this would matter a bit more, but not for a 6 mile urban commute.
    I would say it matters more for start stop type commuting and less for long stretches. For long stretches more energy is spent maintaining momentum. So your governing factors are axle and rolling resistance. But for start stop commuting in traffic you are repeatedly reaccelerating to speed. More energy is getting your wheels moving. So a lighter tire weight helps I think.

  2. #102
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    20,957
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Shahmatt View Post
    I would say it matters more for start stop type commuting and less for long stretches. For long stretches more energy is spent maintaining momentum. So your governing factors are axle and rolling resistance. But for start stop commuting in traffic you are repeatedly reaccelerating to speed. More energy is getting your wheels moving. So a lighter tire weight helps I think.
    I have no debate with the idea that lighter tires are a benefit. The question is cost/benefit in a short commute where tire life will be compromised by road hazards. I use cheap tires because I don't feel my purpose warrants spending more. Others are free to make their own value judgements based on their needs and preferences.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #103
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Singapore
    My Bikes
    Oyama East Village
    Posts
    264
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    I have no debate with the idea that lighter tires are a benefit. The question is cost/benefit in a short commute where tire life will be compromised by road hazards. I use cheap tires because I don't feel my purpose warrants spending more. Others are free to make their own value judgements based on their needs and preferences.
    Start stop commuting for 6 miles in glass strewn streets. How much mileage do you get on average between flats? How much time to do you take to change a flat? How long do your tires last you?

    What if you put on some quality glass resistant tires like the Marathon Greenguard or similar. First you save tire weight so, as agreed, your acceleration from stops will be better. Not only will you save on your overall travel time (even if only marginally), but being more nimble in starting off and breaking away from traffic even for a few seconds is good for safety. At least with my kojak's I love being able to pull away and then get out of the way from traffic piling up behind me.

    Secondly you get fewer flats and hence save time on repairing flats. Thirdly quality tires last much longer. So money is saved in replacements.

    I do not think that a significant amount can really be saved for your type of riding. Funnily enough I think premium tires are most suitable for purposes such as yours.

    But to each his/her own.

  4. #104
    No one carries the DogBoy
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,255
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On one bike I use Kenda Kiniption, 26 x 2.3. I run them at 80psi and they are good for a comfy ride. On my trucker I run conti sport contact 26x1.6. These feel as close to 700x23 race slicks as any tire I've had. The centerline is reinforced but the sidewall is pretty soft. I ride on paved streets/trails for the most part.

    In the winter I run mount & ground 26x1.9s. I hate these tires in the same way I hate our minivan. It inspires no love, but does exactly what I want it to do...prevent me from slipping on ice. This winter I may try some Schwalbe winter tires, but I have no real reason to switch since the M&G are still running strong after 4 winters.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •