Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-15-14, 08:27 PM   #26
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
It doesn't look as bad in the second picture but it still looks like it is there. The forward slant and forward curve of the fork fine tune how the bike steers, and make it more stable and less likely to unexpectedly buck you off onto your face. If the fork is bent back a bit, it can make steering a bit less smooth and more twitchy. As well, a bent fork might break, although that is highly unlikely. Also the impact that caused it may have damaged the ball bearing joint that connects the fork to the steering tube and that joint might wear out sooner.

Last edited by cooker; 04-15-14 at 08:34 PM.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 08:31 PM   #27
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Bikes:
Posts: 8,050
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archery_Queen View Post
i honestly don't see a difference lol. They both look the same to me.


edit oh I see now here's another picture...

Instagram

would this possibly be from someone putting the fork in crocked?
It might be easier to tell if it's bent if most of the bike was visible in the picture. Make sure the front wheel is pointed straight ahead and that you're aiming the camera straight at the bike (not more toward the front or more toward the back).

You could also take it to another shop to get a mechanic's opinion. I think it's pretty hard to bend a fork that evenly.

It's possible an attempt was made to straighten it so at least the legs line up with each other. If it does turn out to be bent, the bike shop might be willing to replace the fork. The color wouldn't match but otherwise it would be fine. I don't think a black fork would look bad on that bike. Maybe even chrome.

They're not that expensive. I guess the question is whether or not the bikeshop would be willing to go to the effort. They might considering they really shouldn't be selling that bike as it is (assuming the fork is bent).

My son bent a fork last year after a small branch went through his spokes. I went to a local bike shop that has a large "salvage yard" to look for a replacement. The shop owner said that lots of times steel forks can be successfully bent back. I'd rather spend the money on a new fork personally.

Also after looking at the picture, it might need some new tires.

Last edited by tjspiel; 04-15-14 at 08:43 PM.
tjspiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 08:47 PM   #28
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
It might be easier to tell if it's bent if most of the bike was visible in the picture. Make sure the front wheel is pointed straight ahead and that you're aiming the camera straight at the bike (not more toward the front or more toward the back).

You could also take it to another shop to get a mechanic's opinion. I think it's pretty hard to bend a fork that evenly.

It's possible an attempt was made to straighten it so at least the legs line up with each other. If it does turn out to be bent, the bike shop might be willing to replace the fork. The color wouldn't match but otherwise it would be fine. I don't think a black fork would look bad on that bike. Maybe even chrome.

They're not that expensive. I guess the question is whether or not the bikeshop would be willing to go to the effort. They might considering they really shouldn't be selling that bike as it is (assuming the fork is bent).

My son bent a fork last year after a small branch went through his spokes. I went to a local bike shop that has a large "salvage yard" to look for a replacement. The shop owner said that lots of times steel forks can be successfully bent back. I'd rather spend the money on a new fork personally.

Also after looking at the picture, it might need some new tires.

Yes they do have lots of low cost used forks that might not be bent. I mean the place I'm buying from is a non profit, so I'm not going to expect them to do everything. I'm willing to fix up the bike, I know hot to do most of the work by my self..

Everyone that works there are volunteers
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 09:15 PM   #29
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
Regarding seat (or, properly, saddle) position, there are three variables: height, tilt, and forward/backward adjustment.

Whoever owned the bike before slid the seat as far back on its rails as she could. The rails are on the bottom part of the saddle. I do that on my bikes, but it may or may not work for you. The guru Sheldon Brown pointed out this puts you in a position akin to a diver crouching to dive into a pool with your head leaning forward and your bum sticking out back to counterbalance. It puts more of your weight on your legs and less on your wrists. If your seat is too far forward, you tend to fall forward and put too much pressure on your wrists.

For seat tilt it looks like it is tilted a bit down at the front. This might cause you to slide forward and always be pushing yourself back. Probably better to have it level or a very tiny bit higher at the front, so you slide towards the back. But not too high or the nose will cause discomfort. Most of your weight should be on the ischial bones ("sit bones").

Re saddle height, your leg should be almost straight at the bottom of the pedal stroke, but not quite. If your butt rocks a bit as you pedal, you are too high. Some people feel it is at the right height if they can straighten their leg when their heel is on the pedal. I like it just a smidge lower than that.

Last edited by cooker; 04-15-14 at 09:19 PM.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 09:42 PM   #30
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
It doesn't look as bad in the second picture but it still looks like it is there. The forward slant and forward curve of the fork fine tune how the bike steers, and make it more stable and less likely to unexpectedly buck you off onto your face. If the fork is bent back a bit, it can make steering a bit less smooth and more twitchy. As well, a bent fork might break, although that is highly unlikely. Also the impact that caused it may have damaged the ball bearing joint that connects the fork to the steering tube and that joint might wear out sooner.

So could this replace the fork? If it can, it's still worth my old roadmaster and 20 bucks. Atleast in my opinion.

Amazon.com: Sunlite LW Fork - 27" x 1-1/4", Threaded, No Cantilever Posts, Black: Sports & Outdoors
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 09:55 PM   #31
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archery_Queen View Post
So could this replace the fork? If it can, it's still worth my old roadmaster and 20 bucks. Atleast in my opinion.

Amazon.com: Sunlite LW Fork - 27" x 1-1/4", Threaded, No Cantilever Posts, Black: Sports & Outdoors
I don’t know...maybe someone else can answer.

Actually, probably no. You have cantilever brakes.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 10:00 PM   #32
thenomad
Riding like its 1990
 
thenomad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: IE, SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 3,749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That is not a "maybe" it is a "definitely" bent fork. Walk away unless he is willing to give you $20 for your bike and a trade. Then go get another fork. Even then i would prefer to just WALK AWAY!

There is a reason he's so accomodating to you, he wants a working bike and even a walmart roadmaster is better than a bent (low level '90s) schwinn.

No, you need a cantilever 700c fork, with a 1" threaded steer tube in the correct length... and there's no reason you should give him $20.

You'd need this to be installed by a mechanic (another $50) IF the head tube is not bent:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...=&sr=8-2-fkmr2

Last edited by thenomad; 04-15-14 at 10:06 PM.
thenomad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 10:04 PM   #33
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenomad View Post
That is not a "maybe" it is a "definitely" bent fork. Walk away unless he is willing to give you $20 for your bike and a trade. Then go get another fork. Even then i would prefer to just WALK AWAY!

There is a reason he's so accomodating to you, he wants a working bike and even a walmart roadmaster is better than a bent (low level '90s) schwinn.

No, you need a cantilever 700c fork, with a 1" threaded steer tube in the correct length... and there's no reason you should give him $20.
Eh, I know this guy I really don't think that's why he's giving me a deal. This is a non profit orginzation that has non salerly volunteers. All their proceeds go to giving bikes to people who need transportation ex. The homeless, and college students. I honestly think he didn't know the fork was bent, they have used forks at their place for free if it goes on one of their bikes.
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 10:06 PM   #34
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenomad View Post
That is not a "maybe" it is a "definitely" bent fork. Walk away unless he is willing to give you $20 for your bike and a trade. Then go get another fork. Even then i would prefer to just WALK AWAY!

There is a reason he's so accomodating to you, he wants a working bike and even a walmart roadmaster is better than a bent (low level '90s) schwinn.

No, you need a cantilever 700c fork, with a 1" threaded steer tube in the correct length... and there's no reason you should give him $20.
This guys knows more than me. Do you think the bent fork means the head tube or bearing tracks are damaged?

Last edited by cooker; 04-15-14 at 10:25 PM.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 06:26 AM   #35
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp
Posts: 7,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No itwill not fit - but it is likely they have a replacement in their pile.
Wanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 07:02 AM   #36
jrickards
Senior Member
 
jrickards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sudbury, ON, CA
Bikes: 2002 Norco Bigfoot, 2012 KHS Tempe, 1988 Bianchi Strada, 2012 Kona Sutra, 2002 Look AL 384
Posts: 2,261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cplager View Post
This. There is no thing as too upright. There is just too upright for you and only you can answer that.
I'm glad you're able to try it out, that winning smile of yours got a couple of nice test ride days.

My wife thought she wanted an upright bike, primarily for commuting purposes, but the couple she tried were very uncomfortable. If it is comfortable for you, then perfect but, as @cplager stated, only you know if it is right for you.
jrickards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 04:22 PM   #37
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Bikes:
Posts: 6,983
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Yeah,fork is def bent. Not sure what else is wrong. If they're willing to swap on a good fork,and everything else is ok(have one of their senior wrenches look it over),then an even swap might be alright. Also hard to tell from the pic,but how are the tires? Is that just dirt,or is there any discoloration/cracking on the sidewalls? If there is,tires need to be swapped.
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X
dynaryder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 05:42 PM   #38
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
Yeah,fork is def bent. Not sure what else is wrong. If they're willing to swap on a good fork,and everything else is ok(have one of their senior wrenches look it over),then an even swap might be alright. Also hard to tell from the pic,but how are the tires? Is that just dirt,or is there any discoloration/cracking on the sidewalls? If there is,tires need to be swapped.
Unfortunately the volunteer today had an emergency of some kind and couldn't open the bike project, but Monday hopefully ill be able to go back and see, at this point even a brand new fork would cost me 20ish bucks, I could put it on my self. I'm not sure if its worth it or not, but this bike is just so perfect for me, I've been looking for a long time. I will have to put sme elbow grease into it, but most things like tires and breaks I can adjust/ replace on my own as long as I have the parts. Would it still be worth it do you think to do a trade plus 20 bucks if I have to buy a new fork?
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 06:10 PM   #39
thenomad
Riding like its 1990
 
thenomad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: IE, SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 3,749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
This guys knows more than me. Do you think the bent fork means the head tube or bearing tracks are damaged?
From the photo I don't see any signs of the headtube being bent but not all signs are visible. It's a heavy guage frame so is 'probably' ok.
Headset could be galled up due to the damage, or maybe it survived, they are usually pretty tough.

To the OP, you have your mind set on that bike so get it. You seem set on paying him $20 as well. I'd advise against the $20 unless he replaces the fork with a comparable model, he may not have realized it was bent. Then again he may not care its bent and be the type of guy who says "hey beggars (literally) can't be choosers. It rolls so ride it."

Since you want it and will get it soon then you've got two options:
New fork - get a good used replacement from him of the right type (700c with cantilevers, NOT a 26" or 27") for proper handling.
Fix fork - Looks like it could be put backif it has been bent right at the junction. NOT ideal but being thick steel 'may be fine'. I wouldn't want to find out on a steep downhill....

I've wrenched on many bikes, from nice to junk. After facing and fixing many types of issues I ALWAYS prefer buying unbroken, unbent, non-bottom-level bikes. Sometimes the final product isn't worth the cost of the fix. Sometimes it is.

Enjoy the bike and post your final build pics. Good luck.

Here's the before and after of a bike in bad shape but unbent and restorable. New wheels and many hours but it was a labor of love for a friend.

thenomad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 06:16 PM   #40
-=(8)=-
♋ ☮♂ ☭ ☯
 
-=(8)=-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: 40205 'ViLLeBiLLie
Bikes: Sngl Spd's, 70's- 80's vintage, D-tube Folder
Posts: 7,903
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I Forgot where you are AQ . . .
Where you are post the CL ads from. I think, Indiana?
If your part of IN is close to Louisville, we a have a few fabulous used bike shops that would take great care of you!
Happy hunting
__________________
-ADVOCACY-☜ Radical VC = Car people on bikes. Just say "NO"
-=(8)=- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 06:18 PM   #41
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenomad View Post
From the photo I don't see any signs of the headtube being bent but not all signs are visible. It's a heavy guage frame so is 'probably' ok....

Since you want it and will get it soon then you've got two options:
New fork - get a good used replacement from him of the right type (700c with cantilevers, NOT a 26" or 27") for proper handling.
Fix fork - Looks like it could be put backif it has been bent right at the junction. NOT ideal but being thick steel 'may be fine'. I wouldn't want to find out on a steep downhill....
Maybe I will take it to a professional bike shop tomorrow and the thier opinion before I say yes or no?
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 06:19 PM   #42
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by -=(8)=- View Post
I Forgot where you are AQ . . .
Where you are post the CL ads from. I think, Indiana?
If your part of IN is close to Louisville, we a have a few fabulous used bike shops that would take great care of you!
Happy hunting
Bloomington Indiana, not very close to Kentucky :-/
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-14, 07:29 PM   #43
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes
Posts: 4,107
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archery_Queen View Post
Unfortunately the volunteer today had an emergency of some kind and couldn't open the bike project, but Monday hopefully ill be able to go back and see, at this point even a brand new fork would cost me 20ish bucks, I could put it on my self. I'm not sure if its worth it or not, but this bike is just so perfect for me, I've been looking for a long time. I will have to put sme elbow grease into it, but most things like tires and breaks I can adjust/ replace on my own as long as I have the parts. Would it still be worth it do you think to do a trade plus 20 bucks if I have to buy a new fork?
If you really like this bike and it fits you good, then yes go ahead and replace the fork. But make sure that the new fork is the same length and size as the old one. Also inspect the frame, especially around the head tube to make sure that there is no other damage.
wolfchild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 09:33 AM   #44
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
If you have it looked at, have them also inspect the frame joints where the top tube and downtube attach to the seat tube. Those step-through frames experience more stress there, than a bike with a horizontal top tube, which provides stronger bracing.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 10:29 AM   #45
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
If you have it looked at, have them also inspect the frame joints where the top tube and downtube attach to the seat tube. Those step-through frames experience more stress there, than a bike with a horizontal top tube, which provides stronger bracing.

Yup to repair it its totally not worth it... 40 bucks for a new fork, and he hold me my derailers and breaks need to be replaced too, they are rusted pretty bad I guess.., ugh the search continues... In the mean time, is this bike worth $50

AMF Scorcher Road Bike
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 11:31 AM   #46
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
The problem is that any cheap used bike is going to need attention. I have bought a number of them and they always cost about $100 to get them in safe working order
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 11:45 AM   #47
Archery_Queen
It's Queen to you!
Thread Starter
 
Archery_Queen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Bloomington, IN
Bikes: Roadmaster
Posts: 96
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
The problem is that any cheap used bike is going to need attention. I have bought a number of them and they always cost about $100 to get them in safe working order
So it's not just this bike, it's all bikes? Hmm okay then maybe it is worth it for the price range I'm looking to spend. Idk...
Archery_Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 12:01 PM   #48
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
Unless it's really badly banged up I think the crossfit is a much better than the scorcher. Those curved pedal cranks are extremely old and obsolete.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 12:30 PM   #49
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,383
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
what i mean to say is the Crossfit will be easier to fix up since it has more contemporary components
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-14, 12:33 PM   #50
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Bikes:
Posts: 8,050
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archery_Queen View Post
So it's not just this bike, it's all bikes? Hmm okay then maybe it is worth it for the price range I'm looking to spend. Idk...
Costs for quality used bikes varies a lot by region. If you're in an area that's got a decent sized population and is popular with cyclists then used bikes are going to cost more.

Maybe 10 or 15 years ago used road bikes were cheap and plentiful since most people where buying mountain bikes and hybrids. Lots of old road bikes sat unused in garages. Then they started getting popular as cheap transportation for younger folks. Many were converted to single speeds and fixed gears.

At the same time triathlons and events like long distance charity rides have increased in popularity so road bikes in general have experienced something of a resurgence. However, very few new road bikes were being sold between the late 80's and early 2,000s. So there's not much available in the used market that isn't either really old or really expensive.

Again, just speaking about the local used market, it's not hard to find a hybrid or mountain bike in good riding condition for $150. A good used road bike is going to cost more than that.

That AMF you provided a link for is a 35 to 40 year old equivalent of a bike from Walmart or Target. On it's best day it wasn't that great of a bike. It most likely has some issues now. If everything works and it has been maintained over the years then it's probably worth $50 or a little more if that's all you had to spend. But it's never going to be a nice bike.

Personally I think you'd be better off fixing the Crossfit if you could do it for under $75
tjspiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:33 AM.