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  1. #1
    It's Queen to you! Archery_Queen's Avatar
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    Different style brakes?

    I've seen a few different styles n brakes including these:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ighlighted.jpg

    and

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ever_brake.JPG

    I have normal v style brakes, but I have seen plenty of bikes with these on them. What's the difference? Is one better than the other??

  2. #2
    Senior Member TransitBiker's Avatar
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    Well, for one, it allows you to fit an aftermarket or other fender in there.... in fact, i believe that may be a fender mount hole right behind the cantilever's round bit? Plus, they look like they may make changing a tire easier vs the clampy kind.

    - Andy
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  3. #3
    Senior Member MEversbergII's Avatar
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    To my understanding they achieve different ends. V-brakes (linear pull brakes) are meant to work well with wide tyres and give clearance for fenders. I think they have their roots in mountain bikes. They're pretty simple to service, so they're popular on commuter / hybrid bikes. However, due to the mechanics involved, they require a special lever. This is because the arms on a linear pull are quite long, and using a regular lever with them creates excessive braking force. Dangerously so.

    Cantilevers also were also for larger tyre/fender clearance.

    Side Pull, single pivot caliper brakes (first one you linked) are older style and have some issues with arm flex. They're on lower end bikes these days. They don't have especially strong braking force.

    Road bikes have a tendency to use dual pivot, side pull calipers
    http://www.wigglestatic.com/images/c...11-11-zoom.jpg

    They track very well and produce good power but don't have much clearance. This is what my Trek uses. Interestingly, I've never had to adjust the things after months of use, while my linear pulls often needed some adjustment at least every other week.

    M.

  4. #4
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    First one is a road caliper, nice light and simple. Terrible for running fat tires. Even with the release open you can onlly get 28mm tires past the pads. That's why CXers run cantis, well also for improved mud handling. The first pic is also a single pivot, newer dual pivot road brakes are stronger.

    The second pic is a cantilever. Better mud clearance. Releasing the brake allows really fat tires to pass.

    Both are short pull. Vee brakes are long pull, so need levers that can do that. Vee brakes can usually do fenders but they're more likely to rattle against the cable.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  5. #5
    johnliu@earthlink.net jyl's Avatar
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    For the road caliper, a deflated tire of any width will pass between the pads. If you're in a repairing-flat-tire situation the tire is likely to be deflated when you remove the wheel, so no problem, and you can defer inflation of the repaired tire until after you've re-installed the wheel. Not ideal, but not a big problem either, assuming time is not of the essence.

    As a practical matter, a given bike frame will either accept road calipers or cantilevers - so you won't actually have a choice.

  6. #6
    Senior Member FedericoMena's Avatar
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    My bike initially came with cantilever brakes and here, being a hilly city, I was NOT satisfied with their braking power. It may have improved with different brake pads, but I found it simpler to switch them to V-brakes. Those worked fine out of the parts bin.

    Now I have a second bike with dual-pivot calipers, and they work great; plenty of stopping power.

    This is all anecdotal; I'm not 100% sure if properly-adjusted cantilevers will brake as effectively as the others.

  7. #7
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jyl View Post
    For the road caliper, a deflated tire of any width will pass between the pads. If you're in a repairing-flat-tire situation the tire is likely to be deflated when you remove the wheel, so no problem, and you can defer inflation of the repaired tire until after you've re-installed the wheel. Not ideal, but not a big problem either, assuming time is not of the essence.

    As a practical matter, a given bike frame will either accept road calipers or cantilevers - so you won't actually have a choice.
    I've put long reach road calipers on a couple of 26er MTB frames with canti bosses. You have to change wheels to 700c also, however.

    I worked with one guy who preferred removing a brake pad to deflating tires. We worked with a lot of cheep bikes with calipers that had no qr and ran fat tires so it was a constant struggle. I had a terrible habit of airing up the tire before reinstalling the wheel. Uggh. That was the worst.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

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