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  1. #26
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    Fuji makes a touring bike for $800: http://www.adventurecycling.org/defa...est_Pelkey.pdf

    That's what I'd get for $800 if looking for a commuter with drop bars. The other bike I'd consider costs $1250: Surly Cross Check Bike - 2013 at REI.com
    I like the look of the Fuji touring a lot. I like the idea of being able to vary my hand positions a lot, and the geometry isn't nearly as extreme as most road bikes I've seen.

    I really doubt any of my LBS's have this model in stock though, so it'd be kind of a gamble. I'll think about it.

    Is it likely that I could ask for a discount off the MSRP if I'm having the shop order me the bike? I see the MSRP is $889...I wonder if they could shave it to an even $800.

  2. #27
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    There are a couple of Jamis's maybe.
    Quest Sport $730:
    JAMIS BICYCLES
    and Ventura Sport $725:
    JAMIS BICYCLES

    Quick glance says it's the same components. Quest is steel and claims to ride smoothly, Ventura is aluminum and claims to be more relaxed.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
    Damn,if one of those was a L I'd be tempted to buy it as a spare.

    For the OP: how good of a mechanic are you(or do you have a good local shop),and how well do you know how bikes fit you? For a sub $1k budget,I think you'd do best going with Bikes Direct. Properly assembled,they have some really good deals.
    Yeah, its really well designed as a jack of all trades and none. As an IBS Schwinn, its top quality and should not be confused with big box store channel Schwinns.

  4. #29
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sullalto View Post
    There are a couple of Jamis's maybe.
    Quest Sport $730:
    JAMIS BICYCLES
    and Ventura Sport $725:
    JAMIS BICYCLES

    Quick glance says it's the same components. Quest is steel and claims to ride smoothly, Ventura is aluminum and claims to be more relaxed.
    Wow...there are so many options.

    I really wonder how I can accurately gauge sizing, if I'm looking at bikes that my LBS may not have in stock, though.

    I feel like my current bike (the Raleigh Mojave 2.0) is slightly too large for me. I got the 20 inch frame.

    I'm sure I need somewhere between a 54cm and a 58cm, but these sizes really don't seem to be very standardized. I would hate to buy a bike and then find out after finalizing the deal that it's too big or too small.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I like the look of the Fuji touring a lot. I like the idea of being able to vary my hand positions a lot, and the geometry isn't nearly as extreme as most road bikes I've seen.

    I really doubt any of my LBS's have this model in stock though, so it'd be kind of a gamble. I'll think about it.

    Is it likely that I could ask for a discount off the MSRP if I'm having the shop order me the bike? I see the MSRP is $889...I wonder if they could shave it to an even $800.
    I really like that Fuji Touring bike. Touring bikes make for good commuters too, with the ability to add fenders and rack. However, they usually don't perform as well as endurance or race road bikes, speed and agility wise. I think I'd rather have either a standard road bike or a performance hybrid, than a touring road bike, unless I was actually going to tour. Touring road bikes perform best as road bikes, when under load.

  6. #31
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    I'm 5'7" and fit guidelines say for fat bikes and 29ers, to go S or 15-16" frame, for mountain bikes M or 17-18", for a CX/fixie bike 52 cm, for road, touring and hybrid bikes 53-55 cm. In general, its the sizing that works well for me. I have ridden up to 60 cm safely but that is about as large as I can fit, as I can barely clear the frame on it. Anything larger is too big. On a mini velo, a 48 cm frame works with a tall stem to bring it up to saddle level.

    You don't want to ride a bike that doesn't feel right when you ride it.

  7. #32
    Senior Member andyprough's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I like the look of the Fuji touring a lot. I like the idea of being able to vary my hand positions a lot, and the geometry isn't nearly as extreme as most road bikes I've seen.

    I really doubt any of my LBS's have this model in stock though, so it'd be kind of a gamble. I'll think about it.

    Is it likely that I could ask for a discount off the MSRP if I'm having the shop order me the bike? I see the MSRP is $889...I wonder if they could shave it to an even $800.
    Performance Bike has Fuji Touring on sale for $799 now.

  8. #33
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyprough View Post
    Yeah but, unless I'm missing something, it looks like they just have a 64 cm frame...I'm between 5'9" and 5'10", so it wouldn't work.

  9. #34
    Yogi on Wheels schiiism's Avatar
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    FWIW, my Univega was a high end touring model in its day. Touring bikes have a smoother ride because of the steel frame, whereas most road bikes in your price range are going to be aluminum with a carbon fork. I'm glad that I made the switch; lugging a touring bike without a big enough load to justify the extra weight was not worth it to me. It's all personal preference and what is best for your specific commute. Mine is all relatively smooth paved asphalt so the aluminum isn't too much of a problem. Also keep in mind your needs outside of commuting, i.e. if you plan to do centuries, recreational group rides, etc etc.

  10. #35
    Yogi on Wheels schiiism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    Yeah but, unless I'm missing something, it looks like they just have a 64 cm frame...I'm between 5'9" and 5'10", so it wouldn't work.
    I would go here: Road Bike Size Calculator

    That will tell you your ideal frame size for a road bike based on your height and inseam. Ideally, when you stand over your bike with feet on the ground, the top tube should be about an inch below your goods. That allows your legs to extend properly while still being safe enough if you have to jump forward out of the saddle unexpectedly. Getting a bike that fits you is just as important as the type of bike you get.

  11. #36
    Team Water Andy_K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I really wonder how I can accurately gauge sizing, if I'm looking at bikes that my LBS may not have in stock, though.
    This should be your top consideration. Proper fit trumps absolutely everything else when buying a bike. Since you've got specific physiological challenges, that makes fit even more important. You really should trust that to geometry charts and online calculators. Unless you can ride the bike before buying, you're taking a big risk. It's probably better to make a long trip to a shop that does stock a bike you want if you can't find one locally.

  12. #37
    Senior Member TransitBiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyprough View Post
    Yup - hard to go wrong with the Fuji Sportif. That will probably be my next bike.

    Absolutely beautiful bike, and so comfortable and quick.
    I see these all over, increasingly. There is one pro racer that lives near me & he and his S.O. both have one.

    - Andy
    I can't wait for the next pint of good chocolate milk after a long ride.

  13. #38
    Senior Member TransitBiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schiiism View Post
    I would go here: Road Bike Size Calculator

    That will tell you your ideal frame size for a road bike based on your height and inseam. Ideally, when you stand over your bike with feet on the ground, the top tube should be about an inch below your goods. That allows your legs to extend properly while still being safe enough if you have to jump forward out of the saddle unexpectedly. Getting a bike that fits you is just as important as the type of bike you get.
    +1

    If it doesn't fit right, you may end up not riding it.

    Its unfortunate that purchasing a bicycle requires more homework than an automobile, or i feel things would be a lot different here in the US. Fit and features in that order should be the priority. You can all most always change stuff after purchase, but you can't realistically make the geometry different.

    - Andy
    Last edited by TransitBiker; 05-31-14 at 03:13 AM.
    I can't wait for the next pint of good chocolate milk after a long ride.

  14. #39
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    I think I'm settled on the idea of not purchasing a bike that I can't first thoroughly examine and test ride. I really have terrible luck in general--I can already envision this relatively large purchase turning into a poorly-sized bike that I will never actually ride, otherwise.

  15. #40
    Senior Member andyprough's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    Yeah but, unless I'm missing something, it looks like they just have a 64 cm frame...I'm between 5'9" and 5'10", so it wouldn't work.
    If you can ride a 54cm or 58cm frame, this Motobecane Gran Turismo looks like a steal at $699:

    gran_turismo_2100 (800x468).jpg
    Last edited by andyprough; 05-31-14 at 11:09 AM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I think I'm settled on the idea of not purchasing a bike that I can't first thoroughly examine and test ride. I really have terrible luck in general--I can already envision this relatively large purchase turning into a poorly-sized bike that I will never actually ride, otherwise.
    Trust me, Ralph...

    With your budget and your back, you should really be looking at Performance hybrids at your friendly neighborhood local bike shops. You'll find some really nice hybrids right in your price range. You won't have to brow beat or negotiate terms or anything, you'll be right there and able to dictate terms at your own price point. Checkout the Jamis Coda Comp, the Giant Escape 1, the Trek 7.4FX, and the Raleigh Cadent 3..

    I would also suggest that you test ride the new Schwinn Super Sport 1 and the Schwinn Slicker.

    * Once you test ride the Slicker, you'll know your size in that model...
    Last edited by WestPablo; 05-31-14 at 12:14 PM.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    Yeah but, unless I'm missing something, it looks like they just have a 64 cm frame...I'm between 5'9" and 5'10", so it wouldn't work.
    Too big. You couldn't even mount the top tube.

  18. #43
    Senior Member gregjones's Avatar
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    Fit calculators that use rider height as a major portion of the fit calculation confuse me. What difference does a long or short neck make in fitting a bike?

    Using the sternal notch measurement takes neck length out the picture.

    Fit Calculator

    Yes, they have a place for height. Can you imagine how many emails that saves having to answer why they don't include it in the measurements list??
    Disclaimer: It's just an opinion that I have. It works for me. I am not the forum "Police (Of Anything)". Others may disagree. And....YMMV.
    Don't use up any brain cells thinking that I care, you don't like anything anyway.

    Click PR Logo
    PedalRoom

  19. #44
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    Neck is a great point I hadn't thought about. I've got relatively short legs for my height, along with a long torso and giraffe neck. I hadn't thought that the smaller sizes might be worth looking at. I only looked at big fat cruiser style bikes before, that only came in s/m/l/xl. But I might not necessarily need the largest size when there are 6, 8 sizes or whatever. Thanks for posting that.

  20. #45
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
    Fit calculators that use rider height as a major portion of the fit calculation confuse me. What difference does a long or short neck make in fitting a bike?

    Using the sternal notch measurement takes neck length out the picture.

    Fit Calculator

    Yes, they have a place for height. Can you imagine how many emails that saves having to answer why they don't include it in the measurements list??
    I kind of have some doubts whether it's worth keying all that info in and taking all those measurements. I mean, I have noticed a difference between one bikes 54 cm and another bike's 54 cm, and really I don't know what I would do with the size I the calculation would give me. For example, what if it said I needed a 56, but then I went and test rode a 54 and preferred it, or vice versa?

    I am sure there is some validity in these calculators, but I think I might prefer to see how the bike feels, without worrying too much about these formulas. I hope I won't come to regret this outlook.

  21. #46
    Senior Member CrankyOne's Avatar
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    OP, unless you have some really beastly hills to climb then I think you should be looking at a Dutch city bike. The Dutch geometry aligns your back and is much more comfortable for most people with back issues than any other option. There is no need to vary your hand position because there is no pressure on your hands.

    If you're near Boston you should check out BicycleBelle. The owner, Carice, is fun to talk to even if you don't find a bike.

  22. #47
    Kamek ralph12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrankyOne View Post
    OP, unless you have some really beastly hills to climb then I think you should be looking at a Dutch city bike. The Dutch geometry aligns your back and is much more comfortable for most people with back issues than any other option. There is no need to vary your hand position because there is no pressure on your hands.

    If you're near Boston you should check out BicycleBelle. The owner, Carice, is fun to talk to even if you don't find a bike.
    I think they're cool, but they're just way too heavy for what I'm looking for. My main complaint with my current bike is that it's just really, really heavy and slow (that, and I think I probably should have gone with the 18" frame rather than the 20").

  23. #48
    Senior Member CrankyOne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I think they're cool, but they're just way too heavy for what I'm looking for. My main complaint with my current bike is that it's just really, really heavy and slow (that, and I think I probably should have gone with the 18" frame rather than the 20").
    Unless you're trying to win the Tour then weight makes little difference, especially for a 7 mile ride. I have a couple of Dutch bikes as well as 15lb road bikes and the difference is minimal.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I kind of have some doubts whether it's worth keying all that info in and taking all those measurements. I mean, I have noticed a difference between one bikes 54 cm and another bike's 54 cm, and really I don't know what I would do with the size I the calculation would give me. For example, what if it said I needed a 56, but then I went and test rode a 54 and preferred it, or vice versa?

    I am sure there is some validity in these calculators, but I think I might prefer to see how the bike feels, without worrying too much about these formulas. I hope I won't come to regret this outlook.
    That's a very intelligent perspective to have, Ralph!

    After all, you've got to think about your back and your own personal comfort. Suppose nobody is right about relying upon some fit calculator. At that point, you will be the only one stuck with an ill fitting bicycle.

    Therefore, I commend you for thinking more independently and more responsibly about your own personal health, comfort, and cycling concerns.

    You've just got to get out there and test ride all the bicycles that you can, until you find the most accommodating one, that calls your name...

  25. #50
    Senior Member CrankyOne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
    I think they're cool, but they're just way too heavy for what I'm looking for. My main complaint with my current bike is that it's just really, really heavy and slow (that, and I think I probably should have gone with the 18" frame rather than the 20").
    I occasionally do a 9 mile each way ride in to St Paul (Cathedral Hill area). There are a number of decent hills along the way (I'm trying to figure out how to produce a profile image from Garmin Connect to post). On my road bike (15 lb Scott Addict) I average 43 minutes, on my Omafiets (40 lb Workcycles Dutch city bike) I average 48 minutes. When I arrive on my road bike I'm in cycling clothes and shoes and often sweaty, when I arrive on my city bike I'm in regular street clothes, usually jeans and oxford shirt, and either not sweaty at all or mildly so.

    If it's above about 90f and/or high humidity then I do have to slow down a bit on my city bike or I will sweat. On these days it's about 55-60 minutes each way. Above about 100f, which I think is always high humidity here, I can't do this route without sweating a bit. I've asked colleagues to let me know if I ever stink and have particularly done so after 100+ degree days and no problems so far.

    On a training/fitness/club ride I'll average 17-20 mph for 25 to 40 miles. Here I'd guess my average would drop to maybe 14 mph on my Omafiets so a much greater difference.
    Last edited by CrankyOne; 06-02-14 at 06:42 AM.

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