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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 06-04-14, 06:44 AM   #1
Tessietest
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Which bike, which pedals?

I want to start commuting again. Lately, I have just been doing organized event rides and training for those on green ways and paved trails in my area. I recently got myself a brand new Cannondale synapse with speedplay zero pedals. I love the bike and I love the power I get with the pedals. My area is not very bike friendly, and I've never commuted on these roads before. Since I am still new to the speedplay zero pedals I worry about safety and how quick I would need to get out of the pedals. Does anyone commute in heavyish traffic with those?
Also in my garage, I have a Trek hybrid that I have used for commuting in the past. I feel comfortable on that bike, but I would love to use my commuting miles as training for a long ride I am doing later in the year. I know I need to put more miles into the cannondale if I'm going do this endurance ride, but I want to be safe. Any suggestions?

Thanks!
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Old 06-04-14, 07:23 AM   #2
Phil_gretz
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The easy answer is that you should continue to learn and become comfortable on your Synapse with Speedplay pedals recreationally, but that you should simply ride your Trek hybrid for commuting and in traffic. You don't need special pedals for the Trek - use what you have.

Is the Trek set up for what you'll really need as a bike commuter? This leads to the standard questions about how much and what type of gear you must carry back and forth, and how you'll handle rain/wet roads, locking and securing, etc. How far is your planned commute?
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Old 06-04-14, 03:55 PM   #3
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Thanks for your response

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
The easy answer is that you should continue to learn and become comfortable on your Synapse with Speedplay pedals recreationally, but that you should simply ride your Trek hybrid for commuting and in traffic. You don't need special pedals for the Trek - use what you have.

Is the Trek set up for what you'll really need as a bike commuter? This leads to the standard questions about how much and what type of gear you must carry back and forth, and how you'll handle rain/wet roads, locking and securing, etc. How far is your planned commute?
I don't have much gear to carry, just the basics: change of clothes, spare tube, water, etc. My new job is 12 miles away, which is a longer commute than I used to do on the trek, but I ride a lot more than that in my training. As a recreation, I ride around 30 miles. I have a u-lock and there are bike posts. As for rainy days, we will see if I just cave in and drive or not.
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Old 06-04-14, 04:27 PM   #4
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I don't see why you can't commute on the Cannondale with those pedals.

I am not familiar with those particular pedals, but I commute on a road bike with clipless road pedals all the time (Shimano). I am very conscious of unclipping my foot whenever i might have to stop, as its really easy if I don't move the foot to click back in. My other bike has mountain SPDs which seem much easier for commuting.

Can you adjust the tension on you pedals to make it easier to get in and out? If so that may help as you get use to it. Can you try the commute on it at off hours the first time? If needed, spend some more time just getting used to it before you try commuting on it.
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Old 06-04-14, 04:48 PM   #5
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What bike are you worried about the most if something happens? You mentioned a u-lock and a bike post so I am assuming you will be locking your bike up outside. If that is the case I would take the hybrid.
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Old 06-04-14, 08:23 PM   #6
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Only commute on the bike with which you feel the most comfortable...That's it!

Once you become acclimated to the Cannondale, you'll know when it'll be time to commute on it.

No need to rush anything!
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Old 06-05-14, 11:16 AM   #7
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Crowd sourced decision making , I don't get it ..


go to a bike shop.. find one you like .. and test ride what's there ..

Taiwan cranks out all the brands most people are willing to plunk down a month's salary or less on ..
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