Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-01-00, 02:39 AM   #1
claude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
claude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Malta, Europe
Bikes:
Posts: 59
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Commuting to work for me, in the jungle of a country that I live in means getting on and off the bike all the time. I recently removed my toe clips in an effort to make this easier but it didn't really work out well! I don't really fancy clipless pedals due to the dedicated shoe thing.. any suggestions for the best pedals to use on such a commute ??
What about the MTB beartrap pedals with adjustable dowels for more grip ??

Claude
claude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-00, 07:07 AM   #2
Cambronne
Senior Member
 
Cambronne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Bikes:
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Feet belts!

Performance sells a decent quality small bear trap style pedal, with sealed bearings. I bought a pair for my commuter, along with the toe straps.

I keep the "feet belts" just slack enough to be able to slip in & out of them with my store-brand sneakers. An advantage of the straps is that on very wet days, I can ride in using old yard-work sneakers or even slip-on canvas beach shoes.

This may not be race winning style, but my racing days ended in 1985... now, all I want to do is get to the office in one piece.
Cambronne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-00, 10:59 AM   #3
Jean Beetham Smith 
Slow Moving Vehicle
 
Jean Beetham Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Norwood, MA
Bikes: Felt F-70, Terry Madeleine, Novara Safari fully customized by me
Posts: 1,068
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Powergrips!

Both Performance & Nashbar carry powergrip straps and complete pedal & strap sets. I've used these quite happily even without any experience with toe clips. It took about 4
rides to get really comfortable with sliding in. Only problem is that the weight of the strap tends to make the strap side be the bottom side, so you need to learn to catch the pedal on the underside to turn them up for entry.
Jean Beetham Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-01, 09:55 AM   #4
raven_nexus
Junior Member
 
raven_nexus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Wales England
Bikes:
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pedals for commuting

When working somewere with heavy traffic or with seriously icy weather i use DMR V8's. A couple of months a go i got some 636 shimano pedals ya know the caged clipless and find them really good for the long journeys.
raven_nexus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-01, 08:43 AM   #5
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,053
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
As a retrogrouch, I use good old-fashioned toe clips on all of my bicycles, and would not consider anything else for commuting or general transportation. I adjust the straps so that I can just slide my feet in or out of the clips. My biggest problem is finding appropriate shoes, having loved my old Avocet touring shoes (steel shank, grooved rubber sole) to death.
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-01, 09:38 AM   #6
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I second John's comment. Toe clips with lose straps give you decent security with quick exit. Shoes, though are a problem. Most trainer-style cycling shoes can be used without the metal cleat, but they all have horizontal slots which catch on the pedals. I remodel mine with a sharp knife to remove some of the knobbles and edges.

I still use Hi Tec silver shadow trainers, budget 1970s style running shoes that are incredibly well built and 1/3 the price of Nikes. Id like them to be a bit stiffer, but they suffice for riding around town.
My pedals are MKS Sylvian Touring with Christophe metal clips and leather straps, retro style and very effective.


I dont trust metal cleats on wet stone, and I know they are not welcome on wooden floors.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-11, 10:27 AM   #7
cehowardGS 
Motorcycle RoadRacer
 
cehowardGS's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 3,828
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
As a retrogrouch, I use good old-fashioned toe clips on all of my bicycles, and would not consider anything else for commuting or general transportation. I adjust the straps so that I can just slide my feet in or out of the clips. My biggest problem is finding appropriate shoes, having loved my old Avocet touring shoes (steel shank, grooved rubber sole) to death.
+1

The same way I do it.
__________________
2001 Raleigh R700
1996 Litespeed Classic
1995 Klein Quantum
1989 Cannondale Black Lightning
1988 Centurion Expert Ironman
1989 Centurion Master Ironman
1986 Raleigh Grand Prix(Btr)
1985 Raleigh Prestige
1985 Raleigh Competition
1985 Raleigh Grand Prix #1
1985 Raleigh Grand Prix #2 (project #1)
1985 Raleigh Super Course (project #4)
1979 Raleigh Competition GS-1
19? Raleigh M50 MTB
19? Cannondale F300 MTB

2007 Suzuki GSX R1K
http://www.cehoward.net/pretty.jpg
75,Old,Dirty,&Fast
cehowardGS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:25 AM.