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  1. #1
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    Just learned how to ride a bike... Which bike would you guys go for?

    Hey guys, after a couple of weeks of researching I narrowed it down to these two bikes:

    Shift 1 - Trek Bicycle TREK SHIFT 1

    Specialized Bicycle Components SPECIALIZED EXPEDITION


    I'm a newbie rider, I am an adult. I wanted an upright riding position and a comfortable ride. These are two bikes I found that seems to be good for me (suggestions welcome).

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    They are both aiming at the same market Niche .. Ford or Chevy ? Toyota or Kia ..

    Here The guy with the SBI dealer franchise is in a Different town for Specialized

    Vs Trek . the nearest one Sells the Shift , the Trek Pure is even more casual a stop with your feet flat

    crank forward design - type.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    They are both aiming at the same market Niche .. Ford or Chevy ? Toyota or Kia ..

    Here The guy with the SBI dealer franchise is in a Different town for Specialized

    Vs Trek . the nearest one Sells the Shift , the Trek Pure is even more casual a stop with your feet flat

    crank forward design - type.
    Hmm, cool, may consider the pure.
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member DVC45's Avatar
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    The shift 1 looks better to me. It also has fork mounts for pannier racks.
    "Cycling is for pleasure not penance"

  5. #5
    Senior Member gregjones's Avatar
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    Of the two bikes you picked out I would choose the Trek. Rigid fork. I didn't look further at anything else. Both bikes thrown together cost about the same as the better suspension forks (fork only, no rest of bike). I doubt that you will be flying down mountain slopes and the rigid fork has nothing but advantages for you.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Astrozombie's Avatar
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    I'd go for more of a hybrid, ended up regretting the "comfort" bike.
    Assume nothing; Question everything

  7. #7
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    I would go the trek route but only because the other has shocks, they are 100% unnecessary outside of bumpy mountain biking. That and if you ever want a front rack or basket, you can basically forget about it. Fenders also are a pain, if not impossible, on most shock systems.

    Upright is the way to ride if you are not a sporty cyclist. It's how the dutch do it for good reason.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by harshbarj View Post
    I would go the trek route but only because the other has shocks, they are 100% unnecessary outside of bumpy mountain biking. That and if you ever want a front rack or basket, you can basically forget about it. Fenders also are a pain, if not impossible, on most shock systems.

    Upright is the way to ride if you are not a sporty cyclist. It's how the dutch do it for good reason.
    Definitely not a cyclist! Just want to ride leisurely for fun.
    Someone mentioned the "Pure" and that you stop with your feet flat.
    What does that mean exactly?
    If it means what I think it means, couldn't I get a smaller one of the other bikes and be able to put my feet flat on the ground?
    I actually want to be able to do that as I am just starting out. I rode my wife's road bike and had a hell of a time. My feet couldn't reach the floor when I"m sitting!

  9. #9
    It's MY mountain DiabloScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coooolwhip View Post
    Someone mentioned the "Pure" and that you stop with your feet flat.
    What does that mean exactly?
    If it means what I think it means, couldn't I get a smaller one of the other bikes and be able to put my feet flat on the ground?
    I actually want to be able to do that as I am just starting out. I rode my wife's road bike and had a hell of a time. My feet couldn't reach the floor when I"m sitting!
    It's all about the saddle to crank distance and angle. Standard bike fitting puts you in a more efficient pedaling position that puts you a little higher and not in a position to have both feet down while in the saddle. Bikes like the Pure put the crank forward which is less efficient but the saddle is lower and lets you put both feet down flat without coming off the saddle. Maybe you'd like it - worth a test ride... also consider Townie.
    http://diabloscott.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by coooolwhip View Post
    Definitely not a cyclist! Just want to ride leisurely for fun.
    Someone mentioned the "Pure" and that you stop with your feet flat.
    What does that mean exactly?
    If it means what I think it means, couldn't I get a smaller one of the other bikes and be able to put my feet flat on the ground?
    I actually want to be able to do that as I am just starting out. I rode my wife's road bike and had a hell of a time. My feet couldn't reach the floor when I"m sitting!
    What DiabloScott said.


    I also agree their suggestion of bike to get. You WANT a more relaxed upright bike. You don't end up with a sore back and have far better visibility(and you can relax, which is nice). While the efficiency is a little lower, it's not a lot. Unless you are in a race I'd not worry about efficiency anyway, it's about the ride and getting places, not the sport. Honestly I feel too many are influenced by sports cycling and think that's how it should be.

    I however would prefer the Electra Amsterdam. But that's more utilitarian and made for hauling groceries home. If that's not something you are interested in, the Townie is a nice, and less expensive choice.
    Amsterdam | Electra Bikes

  11. #11
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
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    or a recumbent...

    Can't beat a recumbent for comfort!

  12. #12
    Senior Member DVC45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shahmatt View Post
    or a recumbent...

    Can't beat a recumbent for comfort!
    Until you have to climb with it.
    "Cycling is for pleasure not penance"

  13. #13
    Senior Member Shahmatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DVC45 View Post
    Until you have to climb with it.
    front wheel drive recumbents like the Cruzbike climb just as well as regular bikes.

  14. #14
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    I just had the great fortune to finally sell my KHS version of that type of bike you asked about. I wanted an upright bike and it was what the LBS said I should get. They are not really upright bikes though. When I finally did get a real upright bike it was a revelation. I have used my real upright more in the past 8 weeks than I used that KHS in the past 8 years.

    IMHO the need for flat footing a bike disappears pretty quickly, say in 50 miles of riding experience. If possible take a lot of test rides before you buy. Since you are new to riding it is very likely your wants and needs will change very quickly as you gain experience. Consider buying used as the new bike depreciation bite may be pretty painful when you want to upgrade your ride.

    Typically for many of these types of posts I did not even answer your question. So l will say, if you must choose between the two, go for the Trek. The suspension front fork is pointless and actually a hindrance.

  15. #15
    Senior Member a1penguin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBC353 View Post
    When I finally did get a real upright bike ....
    What bike did you get that you consider an upright bike?

    I agree that you will get used to not being able to put your feed down pretty quickly. If that is a must have feature, DoabloScott hit the nail on the head; buy a bike designed for flat footed. Otherwise you end up with improper geometry and not only less efficient ride, it will be more difficult on your knees.

    Go the some bike stores and test ride bikes and compare and see what features you like. First and foremost rule is the bike *must* fit.

    Welcome to the world of cycling!
    2012 Cannondale Synapse 3, 2012 Trek 7.5 FX Disc, 2003 Trek 2200 WSD, 1997 Specialized Rockhopper Al Comp

  16. #16
    Senior Member
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    Penguin, I got an Azor Kruisframe (Dutch) and really like it. I also have a Raleigh DL1 and a couple of conversions but I use the Kruisframe the most.

    +1 on fit.

  17. #17
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    Like others I prefer the one without suspension (Trek). Suspension just adds weight and slows you down, and with the seat far back like that, most of your weight will be over the rear wheel and borne by your butt and feet, not your wrists, so there's no good reason to need front suspension.

    Just to reiterate, those bikes have the seat far back so you can pedal without your knees being too bent, yet still reach the ground with both feet. Getting a steeper bike like your wife's with the saddle a bit more forward, but in a smaller size, would cramp your knees when pedalling and might lead to knee strain.
    Last edited by cooker; 08-03-14 at 11:20 AM.

  18. #18
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    To anticipate a couple of other newbie issues. Don't be too alarmed if whatever bike you get has toe overlap, where your toe touches the front tire during slow speed turns. Lots of bikes have that and you learn to manage/avoid it.

    In general, try to "spin" faster in a lower gear rather than "mash" slowly in a high gear - better for the knees.

    Don't get a really soft spongy bike seat or seat cover - they feel more comfortable, but they are more of a threat to your reproductive organs. A firmer saddle with your weight carried by the sitbones in your butt cheeks is best. If you're riding and you find yourself going numb "down there", pedal standing up for a minute or so, every so often to restore blood flow.

    If you want some cushioning in the saddle, get one with springs underneath, not a gel top.
    Last edited by cooker; 08-03-14 at 12:04 PM.

  19. #19
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    Just learned how ...

    Congratulations on learning how to ride a bike!

    Between the two bikes that you short-listed, definitely go for the Trek for the reasons mentioned already. But, before buying that, consider that amongst "upright seating" style bikes, there can be a big difference between how one bike fits your body and the next bike fits your body, comfort-wise, based simply on the difference between various (non-drop) handlebar styles. "Flat bar" style might have you leaning fairly far forward and somewhat down, compared to a fully upright seating position enabled by swept-back handlebars. Wikipedia has a good article about handlebar styles, with lots of graphics.

    In time, you may decide you want to replace some of the original parts on your bike, with different parts. For some parts, this is a low-labor-cost situation at your LBS, or maybe even DIY. But it is not a given that you could have your LBS replace one style of non-drop handlebars with another style, without also re-cabling the brakes and derailers, possibly requiring a mildly immodest expense.

    So I suggest you find an LBS with a couple of different styles of non-drop, non-flat-bar handlebar bikes, whether new or already reconditioned, and try them out. You just might find something more comfortable for you, than even the best-fitting Trek flatbar bike. Possibly even Trek sells something like this, I don't follow the bike market, just recounting my own experience with my last 5 bikes. The most comfortably upright seating position was on the bike with the most swept-back handlebar... I gave up on that bike for other reasons.

    Beyond getting a geometry, frame size and handlebar that will suit you best, tires are the remaining key to riding comfort. Best to get a bike that will accept tires such as 700x37 or wider, while still supporting clearance to add fenders (sooner or later.) Then, keep the tires pumped to a fairly low pressure: high enough to avoid pinch flats or wobbly handling, but low enough to keep you rolling comfortably over rough spots without jarring vibrations. (Rolling resistance is not a big factor at low speeds.) See Science and Bicycles 1: Tires and Pressure | Off The Beaten Path

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