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Old 10-28-15, 06:02 PM   #1
_je
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Cycling route from southern Ontario to Maritimes

Hey gang, I have a crazy idea to cycle next year from Toronto to Charlottetown, or the Cabot Trail, by bike.

Do you have suggestions for routes?

I was thinking Hwy2 out to Quebec. How would I route around Montreal to avoid busy roads?

There's a long stretch past Montreal to NB, maybe Rt.132, then I suppose it's Hwy 130 and 103 down to Fredericton and Moncton, then 16 to the bridge?

Sounds like a big risky ride, but then people do cycle cross-country every year...

Suggestions welcome
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Old 10-28-15, 06:29 PM   #2
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I did Toronto to Quebec City, with a long detour - Kingston to Perth, Perth to Ottawa, Ottawa to Montreal. I was visiting friends along the way.

When I got to Montreal cyclists steered me to the many bike routes through the city.

I did 132 to Quebec City, then stayed at the hostel for a week, took the train back. But you could cross at Levis. When I drove to PEI, I would stop at Rivieres des Loups, and then go south into NB. You could continue on to Mont Joli and go south from there so you hit the coast of NB.

It isn't that risky a ride, Highway 2 is pretty flat. I recall a big hill between Trois Rivieres and Quebec City but not nearly as big as the hills between Ottawa and Montreal on the Quebec side of the river (Deux montagnes, Oka). Lots of small towns and farms between the big cities.
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Old 10-30-15, 06:33 AM   #3
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There are some great places to ride in Montreal and some not so good. You can use La Route Verte as a guide to find better options.
La Route verte

I think there are some tools on this link to help you with a path. Bon route.
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Old 10-31-15, 01:26 PM   #4
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I rode from Ottawa to NB via NS and PEI about 15 years ago. I crossed into Que at Hawkesbury and rode #158 to Berthierville to bypass Montreal. In retrospect, I wish I had gone through Montreal and hung out a bit. From Berthierville, I followed the St. Lawrence north shore through Trois-Rivieres to Quebec City (both cities were very hospitable to a touring cyclist), crossed on the Levis ferry and rode the #132 on the south shore to Riviere-du-Loup. There I picked up the Petite Tamis, a stone dust (old railway line) trail which runs about 134km to Edmundston. You can find camping and other accommodations, and food just off the trail, and every road crossing has little signs that indicate where services are and how far you have to go. I camped at a park (think it had something to do with Yogi Bear) which was about 100 meters off the trail, about half way to Edmundston. The trail is mostly downhill from RdL, but it's dusty and my bike was pretty filthy when I got to Edmundston. There's a NB provincial campground just inside the NB-Que border and it had cycle-only camp sites. I was only cyclist and I had a grassy place to put my tent, bike racks built into the ground, and my own comfort station! Nice. And there was a pub/restaurant in the adjacent town about 10 minutes away.

I continued down through Fredericton and then Saint Johns where I crossed on the ferry to NS. I followed the Annapolis Valley to Windsor and then turned left and headed cross county towards Truro and finally up to Pictou where I caught the ferry for PEI. I spent a week exploring the island, based in Charlottetown at the Southport RV park. There's no tenting there, unless you're either a hiker or cyclist. There's a Tim Hortons just across the bridge and plenty of pubs and restaurants downtown, about a 5-7 minute ride from my campsite. It made the perfect place to take day trips to the north shore unloaded. After 4 nights I moved on to the west end of PEI.

Where I to do this again, though, I think I'd stay on the St. Lawrence south shore a bit further and then route myself over to Campellton and Bathurst and follow the coast down through Acadia to Shediac and then take the shuttle over the bridge.
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Old 11-06-15, 04:44 PM   #5
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I would follow the Waterfront Trail to the Quebec border. In Quebec there is La Route Verte, as has been mentioned. There's a nice trail along the Lachine Canal to get into Montreal. I did the north shore to Quebec City, and then the south shore to Riviere-du-Loup, where I picked up previously mentioned Petite Temis. Follow the St John River to Fredericton, and then over to Monton, and Shediac. Then to the bridge, and the shuttle to PEI.
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Old 11-07-15, 11:43 AM   #6
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Wow, thanks for the suggestions! It sounds like a lot of people have cycled this route, more than I thought. How long were you on the road?

Did you do this on your own or with a group of friends, or an organized tour? I'm a little concerned for risk.

I've done this route by car about 12 times (and back), on the highways, there are a lot of very nice spots I'd like to see, and not focused on the road travelling at warp-speed.
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Old 11-10-15, 09:35 PM   #7
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I did Toronto to Montreal as a six day tour. The Montreal to Charlottetown part was 15 days out of a three month cross Canada tour. I did both tours alone. It's not too risky. You can ride fairly quiet roads for most of this route.
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Old 11-10-15, 10:31 PM   #8
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Take the Waterfront Trail from Toronto to MTL: https://goo.gl/maps/ay8KaaJurAm

From MTL, follow Route Verte #5 to Quebec City. If you stay in MTL, you can simply take Sherbrooke street in the morning. There's little traffic going east at that time.

From QC, ferry across to Lévis and take Route Verte #1 to Rivière-du-Loup and go inland on the Petit Témis trail, or keep going until Ste-Flavie and take highway 132 to New-Brunswick. I like the second option because when you tour the maritimes, it's nice to stick to the coast. I've never been on the Petit Témis or NB interior though.

It's a nice ride overall and you should get some nice tailwind. Some bits around cities (Oshawa) can be confusing and frustrating with useless detours to keep you on a "bike route".
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Old 02-02-16, 09:41 AM   #9
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I did Halifax to Toronto in three weeks. In NB I just followed the old highway or the trans-canada trail in the St. John River valley. There is an awesome bike path between Edmunston and Riviere de Loup, with a rustic bike camping site.

I'd suggest biking through Montreal. It's cool to visit cities along the way. In Quebec it's easy to pick your route based on the Route Verte.
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