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  1. #1
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    Touring E. Canada - Montreal ?

    Hi- Another question for you Montrealers... I'll be flying into the airport on July 3rd at 5pm with my bike. I have no time to spare and I'm thinking of immediately getting out of town. 1. Is there a public transport way (I know not the metro) to leave from the airport? I will be heading north toward Quebec. 2. If there is no way and I have to peddle, what is the easiest route to leave the airport and head north? I flew into that airport 4 years ago and remember it seemed quite easy to get out of. Would there be any chance of finding free camping (a grassy spot either in a foresty area, or in the suburbs, etc.) about 2-3 hours out of the airport? I don't know how wise a decision this is to try and head out so late. Thank you for any info/tips, etc.

  2. #2
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    Are you heading towards Québec by public transport or are you cycling there?

    Anyway, your transport options are:

    - The bus service from the airport to downtown (Queen E. hotel, Gare centrale d'autobus and a few other points): as long as your bike is boxed, it's a piece of luggage just like it was on the airplane. Frequent service, but not cheap.

    - Commuter train from the Dorval station to downtown. Problem is, there are departures from Dorval at 14:32, 17:22 and 20:32, and the train station is about 2 km from the airport terminal.

    Cycling.
    This route leads you out via downtown Montréal, then North-East to Repentigny and eventually Trois-Rivières and Québec City.
    For the most part, the route is as scenic as you might get in a city.
    Around km 0,5: if you don't like the narrow and busy tunnel and roundabout, you may walk through the commuter train station which will be on your right.
    km 8 to 20.5: The Lachine Canal path is superb, very direct and leads you to the Old Montréal.
    From there I suggest boul. Saint-Laurent North, then Sherbrooke East (to avoid that stretch of "cycling path" on Notre-Dame), Honoré-Beaugrand South and Notre-Dame East to Repentigny.
    Problem is there might be a few hidden spots for camping on the Lachine canal or on Île Sainte-Hélène (a bit off track from the Old Montréal), but that would work only IF you don't use the tent (i.e. no rain) and these spots are probably very busy with roofless people. Likewise, there is a small park/forest around km 45, but I would NOT recommend setting a tent: it is officially classified as Park, so fines are heavy.
    This route goes through Laval. It's longer and not as scenic, but for the most part, it's fairly easy cycling.
    The first part is on the service road of Autoroute 520. Be wary of right turning vehicles at autoroute 13 (km 4).
    km 18 to 28: it's on the cycling path which is on the East side of the railroad track. There are quite a few "hiding spots" on that stretch, and unless you have a bright yellow tent, I would not be wary about camping there.
    km 32: This is the easternmost bridge you may cross on a bike. The Highway 125 bridge (km 45) is out for the Summer.
    km 33-57: This is a nice road with quite a few historic houses... and bad modern developments. There are very few camping spots on that road, however.
    – If you want to camp really early, this route should do it.
    km 11-12 are through the Regional Park Bois-de-Liesse where there is officially no camping, but where I'm sure you will be able to find opportunities for guerilla camping. Other opportunities outside the park, between km 12-14. Then you reach civilisation. From there, continue either through Laval and the North shore, or follow this...
    – Here is another option that could be mixed with the two previous routes:
    Circle the island of Montréal on its Northern Shore. Use Gouin Boulevard all the way from highway 117 (boul. Laurentien) to the Eastern tip of the island. There are a few possibilities for guerilla camping near the East end of the island (but don't do it in the Parc de la Visitation!).
    Last edited by Michel Gagnon; 05-10-07 at 07:06 PM.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  3. #3
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    Wow! Thank you for the very detailed help on getting out of Montreal. A sure help, I'm sure! I'm trying to avoid downtown Montreal, as I imagine it would take longer to get out of town. I'll visit Montreal at the end of my trip.
    Cheryl

    Quote Originally Posted by Michel Gagnon
    Are you heading towards Québec by public transport or are you cycling there?

    Anyway, your transport options are:

    - The bus service from the airport to downtown (Queen E. hotel, Gare centrale d'autobus and a few other points): as long as your bike is boxed, it's a piece of luggage just like it was on the airplane. Frequent service, but not cheap.

    - Commuter train from the Dorval station to downtown. Problem is, there are departures from Dorval at 14:32, 17:22 and 20:32, and the train station is about 2 km from the airport terminal.

    Cycling.
    – [url=http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=940434]This route[url] leads you out via downtown Montréal, then North-East to Repentigny and eventually Trois-Rivières and Québec City.
    For the most part, the route is as scenic as you might get in a city.
    Around km 0,5: if you don't like the narrow and busy tunnel and roundabout, you may walk through the commuter train station which will be on your right.
    km 8 to 20.5: The Lachine Canal path is superb, very direct and leads you to the Old Montréal.
    From there I suggest boul. Saint-Laurent North, then Sherbrooke East (to avoid that stretch of "cycling path" on Notre-Dame), Honoré-Beaugrand South and Notre-Dame East to Repentigny.
    Problem is there might be a few hidden spots for camping on the Lachine canal or on Île Sainte-Hélène (a bit off track from the Old Montréal), but that would work only IF you don't use the tent (i.e. no rain) and these spots are probably very busy with roofless people. Likewise, there is a small park/forest around km 45, but I would NOT recommend setting a tent: it is officially classified as Park, so fines are heavy.
    This route goes through Laval. It's longer and not as scenic, but for the most part, it's fairly easy cycling.
    The first part is on the service road of Autoroute 520. Be wary of right turning vehicles at autoroute 13 (km 4).
    km 18 to 28: it's on the cycling path which is on the East side of the railroad track. There are quite a few "hiding spots" on that stretch, and unless you have a bright yellow tent, I would not be wary about camping there.
    km 32: This is the easternmost bridge you may cross on a bike. The Highway 125 bridge (km 45) is out for the Summer.
    km 33-57: This is a nice road with quite a few historic houses... and bad modern developments. There are very few camping spots on that road, however.
    – If you want to camp really early, this route should do it.
    km 11-12 are through the Regional Park Bois-de-Liesse where there is officially no camping, but where I'm sure you will be able to find opportunities for guerilla camping. Other opportunities outside the park, between km 12-14. Then you reach civilisation. From there, continue either through Laval and the North shore, or follow this...
    – Here is another option that could be mixed with the two previous routes:
    Circle the island of Montréal on its Northern Shore. Use Gouin Boulevard all the way from highway 117 (boul. Laurentien) to the Eastern tip of the island. There are a few possibilities for guerilla camping near the East end of the island (but don't do it in the Parc de la Visitation!).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by travelinhobo View Post
    Hi- Another question for you Montrealers... I'll be flying into the airport on July 3rd at 5pm with my bike. I have no time to spare and I'm thinking of immediately getting out of town. 1. Is there a public transport way (I know not the metro) to leave from the airport? I will be heading north toward Quebec. 2. If there is no way and I have to peddle, what is the easiest route to leave the airport and head north? I flew into that airport 4 years ago and remember it seemed quite easy to get out of. Would there be any chance of finding free camping (a grassy spot either in a foresty area, or in the suburbs, etc.) about 2-3 hours out of the airport? I don't know how wise a decision this is to try and head out so late. Thank you for any info/tips, etc.

    Since last year, I've been traveling this route too with my bike and I would take a taxi from the airport. Cost only $25 and it gets me there in a jiffy. What's more, I don't arrive in Quebec in need of rest. I just mount on my bike and get going.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepper_Gabriel View Post
    Since last year, I've been traveling this route too with my bike and I would take a taxi from the airport. Cost only $25 and it gets me there in a jiffy. What's more, I don't arrive in Quebec in need of rest. I just mount on my bike and get going.
    A $25 taxi will not get you from Montreal airport to Qubec city. It might get you to downtown Montreal.
    It is not hard getting through downtown by bike. The Lachine canal path takes you right into the Old Port part of down town, then there is a path up Berri which will take you to Sherbrooke st, or across to the N side of the island via Christophe Coulomb.

  6. #6
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    When you get to Montreal don't ask people how to get north or you will end up in the Laurentian mountains. You want to travel east to Quebec City. Strictly speaking you will be going east north-east, but Quebec City is commonly considered to be east of Montreal.

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