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  1. #26
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    This is great. I now have the green light to add another 6v battery to my setup.
    The problem is I already have a transformer set up which charges my present batteries at about 3 amps and trails off to less than 100ma when the batteries are fully charged. I would have to set up another charger as I prefer to charge all the batteries at once and at the same charge rate.

    I do agree with you that the bike is much nicer to drive with that bit of extra power.
    Last edited by PMD283; 07-27-07 at 04:47 AM.

  2. #27
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    My modified 36V version.
    Now it would weigh 10 lb more due to tha added battery in the red bag.
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  3. #28
    Junior Member olps's Avatar
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    I've always wondered, what made you decide to get a foldable electric (as opposed to a standard one)? I always thought that a foldable electric would be great, simply because in some situations you don't want to lock it up outside and you could take it on a train with you or something.

  4. #29
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olps View Post
    I've always wondered, what made you decide to get a foldable electric (as opposed to a standard one)? I always thought that a foldable electric would be great, simply because in some situations you don't want to lock it up outside and you could take it on a train with you or something.
    Because it could be put in the trunk of a car.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by olps View Post
    I've always wondered, what made you decide to get a foldable electric (as opposed to a standard one)? I always thought that a foldable electric would be great, simply because in some situations you don't want to lock it up outside and you could take it on a train with you or something.
    Let me add my 2 cents worth here. Besides the folding feature of this bike I like the construction quality. It appears to be made of a thick light aluminum alloy, much lighter than it's Izip big brother. For $599 Cdn it's a great "bang for the buck".
    The 13 inch tires make it a bit more unstable (when you hit holes) but on the other hand they also make it very manouverable (great for avoiding pedestrians on the sidewalk).

  6. #31
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    This morning . I took my ebike to downtown Vancouver, touring around English Bay and Stanley Park. The whole trip recorded 43 km.

    On most roads, I could manage 30-38 km/h.
    Pedalling is only used to assist starting. Pedalling could not be used if the speed is over 20 km/h due to one pedalling speed.

    On gentle slopes about 25 km/h. If I had multiple gears I would pedal assist to 30 km/h for this gentle slope and also save battery energy.

    On difficult slopes about 20km/h with pedal assisting. I don't think that I could pedal only on these slopes.

    Around English Bay and scene routes 15km/h mainly by pedalling. Bicycle-style ebikes on these routes will be definitely more friendly than Vespa-style ebike.

    On the way back for the last several kms, I could only do 20 km/h or less because the batteries were EMPTY.
    Voltages for the stock 24 V 12Ah battery: 12.03V and 12.03V (EMPTY).
    Voltage for the added 12V 14 Ah battery: 11.68V (too weak).
    It seems the 14Ah has less Ah than the stock 12 Ah.

    Comments:
    1) There were no heat problem in both controller and motor when working at 36V battery. Both controller and motor remained luke-warm during the whole trip.
    2) Higher speed and better accelleration.
    3) The stock 24V 15A controller could work at 36 V happily.
    4) One could ride the 36V version with much pleasure than the stock 24V version.
    5) Lastly, I am very tempted to try it on 48V!!!

  7. #32
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Test results with output waveform could be seen at:

    http://endless-sphere.com/forums/vie...?p=22972#22972

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by The7 View Post
    Test results with output waveform could be seen at:

    http://endless-sphere.com/forums/vie...?p=22972#22972
    I have added the additional 6 volt battery to bring it to 36 volts and I am getting similair results to you. Max speed approx 35 km/hr and better acceleration and hill climbing. I haven't done any distance tests yet.
    One question I have is why the Strong GT-S210 gets mileages of >50km with a similair battery pack of 36v 12ah and it is a much heavier bike. Is it that much more efficient? Do the large tires give it that much less rolling resistance? Or do they discharge their batteries to the point where they offer no assist at all?

  9. #34
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMD283 View Post
    One question I have is why the Strong GT-S210 gets mileages of >50km with a similair battery pack of 36v 12ah and it is a much heavier bike. Is it that much more efficient??
    It has a higher power motor and seems to be so.
    The strong has 21 speed so that one could pedal assist at any speed (even upto 35 km/h).
    With only one speed on AL1020, it is very difficult to pedal assist over 20 km/h. If AL1020 has multi-pedalling, one could pedal assist at easy to extend it to a longer range.

    Quote Originally Posted by PMD283 View Post
    Do the large tires give it that much less rolling resistance?
    Yes, I think so. 26" wheel seems to have less resistance because my 26" MTB with 21 speed is much easier to pedal.

    Quote Originally Posted by PMD283 View Post
    Or do they discharge their batteries to the point where they offer no assist at all?
    Not quite so.

  10. #35
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    All I have to say about the Schwinn fold able AL1020 is "WOW", i cant believe i can have so much fun on a bike! It happen at Canadian tires in Langley and i was speed walking around the store looking for the bike. Once i found it i start doing a circle check like i was buying a car. Moments later, a couple "at their 50s" walk up and we start talking whats the benefit of an electric bike. The man quickly start looking for the plug and switch to turn the bike on. After we found it out, He let me to have the first ride around the aisle. I pedal start and hold the throttle until I ran out of road. The Schwinn AL1020 felt a bit loose steering other than that its perfect. The frame was solid. Didn't give me a feeling its going to fall apart. I am 6 foot 4 and I can pedal comfortably without stressing my legs or my arms. Too bad I just missed the $100 off sale last week at canadian tires. oh well guess i'm going to wait for the next sale! The7 i will pm you my # after i come back from my trip victoria. thanks The7 and don't stop modding your bike. haha

  11. #36
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    I suppose a good question would be: how much do YOU weigh? I am about 6'6" and about 235lbs. While I can fit well on the bike, I find the 24V to be a bit sluggish underneath me (I got about 12Km before EMPTY). I would love to try mod one of our AL1020 bikes with the added 12V, but I don't know where to start. Is there a good place to get those extra 6V or 12V batteries? Also, can you post pictures of how you hooked them in serial?

    Another question: How would the bike handle two batteries in parallel? Would this just increase the range?


    John

  12. #37
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanamj View Post
    I suppose a good question would be: how much do YOU weigh? I am about 6'6" and about 235lbs. While I can fit well on the bike, I find the 24V to be a bit sluggish underneath me (I got about 12Km before EMPTY). I would love to try mod one of our AL1020 bikes with the added 12V, but I don't know where to start. Is there a good place to get those extra 6V or 12V batteries? Also, can you post pictures of how you hooked them in serial?

    Another question: How would the bike handle two batteries in parallel? Would this just increase the range?


    John
    12 km range for people of your size for 24V12Ah battery sounds a little low. 20 km range is reasonable on flat But it depends on the condition of road.

    For 36V, connect the extra 12V 12Ah battery in series with the stock 24 V 12Ah battery.

    For 2 in parallel, top speed will be remain the same but you may feed better torque because the parallel batterys could maintain the voltage at high current. The range will be more than double.
    Last edited by The7; 08-06-07 at 05:54 AM.

  13. #38
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Further modification:

    Bought an used 48V Xtlye controller to replace the stock Ananda controller so that 48 V battery could be used for the motor.

    The phase-sequence of Xtlye and Ananda are reverse such that same color connection will not work at all. Some modification is required to match the Hall sensor supply.

    Initial bench test shows very promising.
    With 24V and 36V, X-controller has the same results as A-controller. No-load top speed are 30 and 45 km/h. But X has a higher current limit of 19A ( vs 15A for Ananda).
    With 48V, the no-load top speed is 61 km/h using X-controler. The expected top speed on flat would be 40+ km/h.

    Will road test with 36V and 48V battery later.
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  14. #39
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    Good work! 40+km/h makes the 1020 start to look interesting, and it would be priceless to pass roadies on a Canadian Tire folding ebike.
    Team Mavic, winner of the 2003 Cycle to the Sun race

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by The7 View Post
    12 km range for people of your size for 24V12Ah battery sounds a little low. 20 km range is reasonable on flat But it depends on the condition of road.

    For 36V, connect the extra 12V 12Ah battery in series with the stock 24 V 12Ah battery.

    For 2 in parallel, top speed will be remain the same but you may feed better torque because the parallel batterys could maintain the voltage at high current. The range will be more than double.
    That 12km was actually about 14km.. It was our first ride on the bikes, so it was a bit lower. Today, on our second charge since purchase, we went about 21km on a slightly hilly paved path and still had one light showing. My GF is 110lbs and she had two lights left lit on her bike.

    Do you have a recommended place to buy a 12V battery? I wouldn't know where to look.

    The speed is fine for me (local path laws kind of cut down what you can do), I just want more range out of it. I was even considering just buying two, and swapping the cable from Bat 1 to Bat 2 when the first one dies. In your opinion, would there be any extra stress on the controller to use two of the original 24V batteries in PARALLEL?

    J

  16. #41
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    All of this info can be great for other owners of this bike.. We should set up a small micro site with a small forum for this bike.

  17. #42
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    No extra stress on the controller with parallel packs. 12V SLA batteries can be found almost anywhere. If there are no battery specialists near you, try a motorcycle shop.
    Team Mavic, winner of the 2003 Cycle to the Sun race

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowell_ View Post
    No extra stress on the controller with parallel packs. 12V SLA batteries can be found almost anywhere. If there are no battery specialists near you, try a motorcycle shop.
    Ahh yes, I did a quick search and found some local battery dealers. I might just buy a second original 24V from CT and run 2 in parallel. I also plan to find a keylock to control the flow of power so I can have a handlebar-mounted ignition key.

  19. #44
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    I converted my Crystalyte controller to a keylock switch instead of a push button. Highly recommended if you're a commuter and have to lock your bike up.
    Team Mavic, winner of the 2003 Cycle to the Sun race

  20. #45
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    Do you have a suggestion of where to find such a lock? I did some searching and came up empty.

  21. #46
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    Try an electronics shop, or security/alarm place.
    Team Mavic, winner of the 2003 Cycle to the Sun race

  22. #47
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The7 View Post
    Further modification:

    Bought an used 48V Xtlye controller to replace the stock Ananda controller so that 48 V battery could be used for the motor.

    Will road test with 36V and 48V battery later.
    Bad news:
    The X-controller died on the first day of road test with 36V battery after a few minutes.
    At first, it was suspected due to faulty FETs.
    But it was found later due to an faulty driver (IR2101S) for the yellow low side FET.
    Why the driver failed is unknown. It is an used controller and could die of old age.

    Will use the stock controller at 36V until further action.
    Last edited by The7; 08-07-07 at 02:12 PM.

  23. #48
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Bought another newer version 20A X-controller (also used) and after a long bench test.

    It was finally road test this afternoon.
    Excellent weather.
    Temp 20 C.

    Using 24V and 36V (sorry don't have 48 V battery at present)
    With the 20A X-cont (Crystalyte controller).
    Hard driving (pushing to the battery current most of time) about 18 km
    With 20A limit at 36V battery, the motor did take peak power of 720W
    Battery voltages at end of test = 12.23V, 12.22V and 12.14V


    Comments:
    1) Top speed at flat at 24V and 36V are not much different from
    A-cont (Ananda controller 15A).
    2) The accerelation is better with higher battery current limit of 20A (vs 15 A of A-cont).
    3) Faster speed on slope due to a higher battery limit.
    4) Battery current limit is same (about 20A) for 24V and 36.
    5) I could ride a bit faster due to better torque and higher battery current limit
    6) The motor and the controller were only lake-warm during the road test.
    7) X-cont will stay in AL1020 with A-cont as spare.

    Will road test with 48 V battery when available
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  24. #49
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Using 36V battery on road test again using 20A X-controller this afternoon:

    1) The ebike pulled up slopes with higher speed (about 3 -5 km/h faster than that of 15A A-controller)
    2) On flat, it could reach and cruise at 35 km/h with greater easy.
    3) Soft start is also in incoperated in the brake switch. That means that you press the brake and twist FULL throttle, the ebike motor remains OFF. As soon as you release the brake, the motor will still ramp up to FULL throttle effect slowly by soft-start circuit. This is not the case with A-controller.

  25. #50
    Senior Member The7's Avatar
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    Finally using 48 battery on 20A X-controller at AL1020 ebike:

    The 48V was composed of 2X12V12Ah (stock) + 12V14Ah (car jumper) + 12V7Ah (car jumper)

    After 10 km of hard riding, the batteries read
    12Ah => 12.79V and 12.80V (<70%)
    14Ah => 12.74V (<70%)
    7Ah => 12.21V (<25%)

    Using fast accelaration such that the battery current reached its limit of 20A most of the time. Riding with FULL throttle on most road if possible.

    This afternoon, the weather is very good.
    Temperature = 19 deg C.

    1) Top-speed on flat = 45km/h (c.f. 35 km/h with 36V battery)
    2) Speed on gentle slope = 32 km/h (c.f. 25 km/h with 36V)
    3) Faster acceleration with better torque.
    4) Better control with reserve power at same speed as that of the 36V battery.
    5) The motor and the controller remained lake-warm during the hard test.
    6) Peak input power = 48X20 = 960 watt
    7) Seems there is no problem to maintain an input power of 500 watt at 48V.
    Now going to shop 2 new 12V12Ah to replace the temperary car jumpers.

    Wonder whether it is the fastest foldable 16” ebike ! ?
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    Last edited by The7; 08-21-07 at 05:01 PM.

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