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Thread: eZee Torq ebike

  1. #1
    Senior Member Groundhawg's Avatar
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    eZee Torq ebike

    Do any of you guys and gals own a eZee Torq ebike? If not, what are your opinions on "eZee ebikes". Are they any good? I saw on a uk forum where a lot of people like them.

    Here's a link to the "eZee Torq ebike" Click Here. I'm also looking at the eZee Liv ebike. Here the link to it. eZee Liv ebike

    I'm still looking at the Giant Suede e. Click Here.

    If any of these bikes go out of production, will I still be able to get parts for them? I noticed one website stated that the Giant suede e is no longer being produced for the usa. However, their are still some around. I'm looking at all 3 of these bikes very seriously. If all 3 were to stop production tommorow, I wonder if I could still buy the original batteries and hub motor?

    What's ya'lls opinions on the eZee bikes and the giant? I want a ebike very bad. There's just no dealers in my area for ebikes, or kits. I'm not mechanically inclined at all. There is a giant dealer located about 75 miles away from me. They can get the Suede e for me by special ordering it. However, the nearest giant dealer that works on these bikes is 250 miles away.

    My local bike shop located 35 miles away won't install any conversion kit on my trek 7100. They've never installed one before, and said they didn't have any future plans on ever doing it. I'm afraid I'm going to spend a lot of money and the ebike, or ekit, break, and I will have just thrown money away. Since no one in my area works on them.



    Here is how I intend to use the bike:

    *Use it mostly for running errands. Probably ride about 10 miles per day

    * All riding will be on flat ground, no hills in my area.

    * No bike commuting as I'm retired

    *I'm willing to spend up to $1800

    I really want an ebike. The concept sounds great. No gas, no insurance, no licence needed. Sounds like a lot of fun. I really enjoy riding my 2 bikes. With that said, I have 2 bike shops who refuse or are not qualified to work on any ebike or install any kit. In other words. I'm on my own.

    One bike shop did say they could install a kit for me. However their price would be $60 an hour. Since none of their mechanics have ever installed one before, they said it could take up to 8 hours !!! That's $480 just for installing a "Bionx kit" on my 7100. Giant bikes have already stopped producing the lite, and suede e bikes. That isn't a very good track record for a major name brand bike manufacturer like Giant imo.

    I guess people just don't know about these bikes. Or their is not that big of a demand for them.
    Last edited by Groundhawg; 10-27-07 at 04:35 AM.
    Ken Kifer

    "Making the simple complicated is commonplace;
    Making the complicated simple, that's creative".
    - Charles Mingus

  2. #2
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    I have never personally installed a kit but have read several reports from people who have and they all say that they are pretty simple and need about an hour to install. The nice thing about kits is that they are components. If your controller or motor gives out it is likely that you will be able to find another to replace it but you may have to do some mods on ur bike. For example, if your motor gives out you may not be able to find another one as small as the one on your bike so you may have to have the wheel rebuilt. It is an additional expense but it is do-able. Most battery packs in kits are designed to be rebuilt or can easily be swapped with other mfg batteries, as long as the technology is the same. There are some bikes that you can buy that have the batteries stored into parts of the frame or unique situations. these bikes will probably give you trouble if the mfg stops supporting them.

    As far as people not wanting to work on it, most people these days want to turn a quick buck so will not begin something unless they see a reasonable amount of return in a reasonable amount of time. Also, if you are so remote from them there may be no other market for these bikes so they are not willing to invest the time/money into getting the training and tools to do this kind of work.

    One option for you...I could not find the general vicinity of you home in ur profile...there are less expensive ebikes you can buy for $600 for the whole bike. You can probably have them shipped to your home for $100. If after a couple of years the bike dies you are only out $700 and can buy another one. Your requirements are not very demanding so even the most common ebike is likely to satisfy them. Is there a Walmart nearby?

  3. #3
    Senior Member blippo's Avatar
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    I have an E-Bike. I also bought a kit for my mountain bike. I will tell you my best advice. Buy a kit. I bought the Wilderness BL36 and installed it myself and I am not mechanically inclined. There are a few other kits out there I'm sure you'll be satisfied with. They make them pretty easy to install. You don't need a bike shop to install these kits. All you have to do is take your time and read the instructions. They have telephone support if you get stuck.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Groundhawg's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. i contacted a dealer who sales and installs the "Bionx Kit". I asked him if it would fit my bike. My frame is the smallest trek makes..15 inch frame. I was worried that the battery pack wouldn't fit in the area below the top tube. ( the dealer is located about 2000 miles away)

    He told me that he has installed several on the 15 inch frame. I'm probably going to go with the "Bionix kit". I really like the trek 7100 bike. It's been trouble free ever since I bought it, and I enjoy riding it. It's very comfortable. It also has "specialized Armadillo tires" on it. with the flat proof technology.

    My son is coming home for a visit soon. He said he would install the kit for me. So that's good news. So, I think I will install a "Bionix Kit" and forget about the the giant and eZee bikes. Thanks again for the help everyone.
    Ken Kifer

    "Making the simple complicated is commonplace;
    Making the complicated simple, that's creative".
    - Charles Mingus

  5. #5
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    Ezee

    I was going to purchase one of their bikes, I opted for an urban mover which I regret!
    Think about after-sales service before purchasing, I have major problems with Urban Mover.
    Might buy an Ezee next time

  6. #6
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    I have an Ezee Quando II, which I bought back in June of this year...it's a great bike...sturdy, zippy, and lots of fun. Ezee seems to have a pretty good reputation for making quality e-bikes. I've got a Li Ion battery, and though I average about 10 - 15 miles before recharging at night, I've gone up to 30 miles w/out charging.

  7. #7
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    Weechey-What's the difference between the quando and the quando II and why did you choose the latter? Where do you ride your bike? The torq is too expensive and I was thinking about buying the quando for commuting. This would be a one-way commute of about 8 miles on mostly flat ground and I could recharge at work, where I could fold the bike and put it out of the way. I've never had a folder and don't know if it would be suitable for commuting. What do you think after having use your bike for 6 months?

  8. #8
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    I live in a relatively flat area, without many hills. The II has no suspension, from what I understand, and also has a rack that can hold up to 50lbs as opposed to 20 w/ the I. The only downside would be the single gear of the bike...if the battery conks out, you're stuck pedaling w/o much options in terms of gearing. otherwise, it's great.

  9. #9
    Its not my fault jerryt's Avatar
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    weechey,
    I am seriously considering a Q II and was glad to see your positive report. I also live in a flat area and don't require gears. I'm primarily interested in the portability (folding aspect) and the smallness as well as the lighter batteries. I'm also hoping its as fast as my Worksman with a Wilderness BL36 (600w) motor and 36v battery. I'd be interested in any other comments you have about your bike.
    “Gradually it was disclosed to me that the line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either—but right through every human heart.” —Alexander Solzhenitsyn

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