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  1. #1
    Senior Member Mike B.'s Avatar
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    Are you willing...?

    Hello,

    Are you willing to help a avid cyclist convert? Here is the bike I own http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...estore_ID=1366
    It's a hell of a commuter and I really enjoy it.

    Can any of you guys give me advice of what I'd need to do to convert my bike to an e-bike. Also an estimate as to the cost would sure be helpful.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
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    southeast pennsylvania
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    a mountain bike with a cargo box on the back and aero bars on the front. an old well-worn dahon folding bike
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    I expect E-bike setups that will work for you will cost at least $300. (But it looks like wheel size to match your bike is not available.) From there, you pay more to get more power, better range, lighter weight, more efficiency (meaning you get slightly more range or can pick a slightly smaller battery.) The cheapest you can go is going to get you a bike that is fine for power if you are riding on flat ground or if you pedal most of the time. Things start getting more expensive when you want to get more than 8 miles or so (no pedaling) of range or if you want a bike that's only a little heavier than a regular bike (doesn't matter that much really.)

    The things you need are: motor, controller, throttle, battery, and charger. Typically anything that is described as an e-bike "kit" includes motor, controller, and throttle, and may include battery and charger.

    By the way, the bike you own looks great, and I'm sure it will make a nice e-bike.

    If you buy a hubmotor kit, be sure to pick one with the motor built in to a 700c wheel since that's what your bike is made for. FYI, most kits you will see for sale are hub kits.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Mike B.'s Avatar
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    cerewa,

    Thanks for the info. I know I have alot of work yet to do before I decide.

    BTW, I know alot of Quakers. For the most part they are good people, very good people!

    Leaving today for Wash. D.C. for a week. Talk to ya later and thanks again!
    I may not be the most important person in your LIFE.
    I just hope that when you hear my name you smile and say,
    THAT'S MY FRIEND!

  4. #4
    Both Coasts...
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    Great bike but couple things working against you for conversion. 700cc is the 1st hurdle for a hub motor. Next thing is an ebike barely needs 3 spds, let alone 24 spd.

    You might be better off using a Cyclone BB drive - take advantage of all those gears and you don't have to monkey with your 700cc wheels.

    I suggest you get to know Electric Rider on the other end of your state in Lawrence, KS. A 26" 36/48V Roadrunner setup would run about $600-700 respectively. Mind you, that's with heavy SLA batteries. $350-400 sans batteries and you won't be disappointed getting into Lithium - costly but excellent characteristics for ebikes. Make friends with RC airplane folks!

    http://www.electricrider.com/index.htm

    I like my ebikes to be 26" cruisers. Comfy seats, slightly feet forward, easy on/off. 3-5 spd internal hub gears at most - you got a motor, ya know?

  5. #5
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    I personally am a huge fan of good solid(if somewhat to heavy) gear less hub motors, that can be laced into any size wheel and you never have to worry about breaking a chain or snapping a gear. Quiet, stealthy and you have a massive amount of variability. a crystalyte 5 series can be used anywhere between 500 watts and 5000 watts and still hit peak efficiency. They don't say in that webpage what material the bike is made of, I assume aluminum so i should say anything over about 500 watts you will need torque arms even if you put it on the back wheel.

    What kind of price range are you looking for and what kind of performance are you looking to achieve? You can go from what amounts to a light motorcycle down to a slow cruiser that requires you to pedal to get up the smallest of hills. Also a note on internal hub gears, I talked to the guys at my LBS about them and it was suggested that they wouldn't stand up to the strain of a motor, certainly this could be BS and I think ive seen a few people praising how reliable their hub gears are. It probably depends on the quality of the hub.

    What kind of range are you hoping for and do you want to pedal primarily, or only as a booster when you want to?

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