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  1. #1
    Member toyotaboy's Avatar
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    Gonna buy the cyclone kit next

    My hub project was fun:
    Just got my electric kit from china

    but I think next spring I'm gonna sell it off and start fresh. Been looking at the cyclone motor that runs inline with the chain (which other people have bought on this forum). Some buy the 500watt kit available from the american site, I think I'm going to buy the 1200watt kit directly from the Taiwan website:
    http://www.cyclone-tw.com/order-M.htm

    I know most people complain that the derailluer pulleys wear out fast because it's a fast metal chain pulling on plastic gears. Did some research, and I'm sure I'm not the first one to discover this but they make ceramic bushing on aluminum alloy cogs:
    http://fairwheelbikes.com/kcnc-ceram...c7d773bc765e9f

    $32/each isn't cheap, but not terrible. Did a search on ebay, some are selling a pair for $30. Metal chain on metal cog, and a ceramic bushing which can handle high speeds and high temperatures, should work out well.

    For anyone that doubts the power of gearing, check out these videos:
    75mph using dual 1500watt motors:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6o-g7YeC4Q

    Climbing stairs like it's nothing :
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFNRIqexC0g

    With that said, there's definitely a sharp trailing off return as you approach high speeds. One 1200watt motor is rated at 45mph (for lightweights), it takes 2-1/2 times more power to bump that up to 30mph more. I'm sure it has to do with wind resistance. By the way, I don't intend on doing those speeds, my likely top speed will probably be 35mph. BUT, if I'm even going to be going that fast, I'm going to want to start with a bike that at least has disc brakes.
    Last edited by toyotaboy; 10-21-09 at 05:44 AM.
    I ride the asphalt, one mile at a time

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    May 2008
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    San Diego, CA
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    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem
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    Sounds to me like motors that drive the pedals are more efficient than motors that drive the hub directly. They let you use the bike's gears on hills, letting the motor turn up to its full power (or max efficiency, take your choice).

    The bad news is, with motors that drive the pedals (or the bike chain) directly, the pedals are always turning as long as you want the motor to supply ANY power. You can't do long, medium-speed cruises on flat ground, unless your feet are always cranking away, even if you wanted the motor to do all the work. You can't coast and let the motor push the bike.

    Only way to get around that, is to take the pedals and crank arms off the bike, and maybe put foot pegs on the frame. But in many states, such a bike would no longer be a bicycle under state or local law - it would become a motorcycle, and require lights, fenders, windshield, turn signals, brake lights etc., and have to be registered as a motorcycle.

    For that reason, I've decided to go with a hubmotor instead of a crank motor like the Cyclone.
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  3. #3
    Senior Member nwmtnbkr's Avatar
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    If you're still living in Illinois when you go to buy this kit, you may want to check with your state's DMV. The last thread I read on state laws included a reference by someone in Illinois that all e-bikes are classified as mopeds and must be licensed and insured. Also, there was a speed limit on mopeds in Illinois, which may still be applicable--30 MPH is the upper limit for mopeds.

    People mistakenly think that because there's a reference to electric bike standards in federal law that it some how compels states to allow electric bicycles to be operated on public roads. That's not the case, Congress has left it to the individual states to determine whether electric bicycles can be operated on their public roads and what conditions to impose if they are allowed to be operated on the roads. The federal law only sets safety standards for finished electric bicycles sold in the US. Laxer federal safety standards that are set by the Consumer Protection Safety Administration only apply to electric bikes with speeds under 20MPH and motors 750W or below. Electric bikes that don't meet those standards (they're faster and/or motors are more powerful) must meet more stringent moped/motorcycle safety standards set by the Federal Highway Safety Transportation Administration. That's why you don't see many production bikes with specs similar to these 1000W Chinese kits. Ultimately, I expect Customs to start cracking down on the import of the more powerful kits into the US.

    I'm glad you're looking at bikes with disc brakes. I also wouldn't put it on an aluminum frame. I'd want a beefier steel frame. You should also wear the appropriate safety gear if you're planning on riding at motorcycle speeds.

  4. #4
    Member toyotaboy's Avatar
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    Little acorn: Way ahead of you (I was worried about this too), This kit replaces the pedal cog, so it won't spin when the motor is on. This video prooves that:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wNo5SM2da4

    nwmtnbkr: Yes, you are right. There is laws about wattage and mph, and I don't really care (especially since I'll be on the borderline of speed with my weight). The odds of an officer actually wasting their time to verify the wattage of my motor are so rare I'm REALLY not that concerned. I also speed and use a radar detector in my car, even tough that's not legal either. When I get it running well, I may fabricate some covers so there would be no way for anyone to really tell I have a motor installed.
    I ride the asphalt, one mile at a time

  5. #5
    Senior Member Kevinator's Avatar
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    I just installed a cyclone on my new Dahon Boardwalk. The kit came off my old bike so I have some experience with it. Not sure if you ever got the kit since this thread is a few months old, but I'd recommend it over a hub motor. The Cyclone is lighter and leaves your bike much more balanced than a hub motor.

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