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  1. #1
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    New 48V 1000W rear hubmotor project from daoji at YXM Corp. in China

    This may turn into a long, serial thread. I ordered and paid for a 48V, 1000W rear hubmotor from daoji888 of YXM Corp. in China, on Oct. 29. They shipped it on Nov. 5 (700c rims were out of stock, hence the delay), and today (Sat. Nov. 14) I got a call from the post office saying a big box had come in by EMS after the daily carrier had left, and should they send it out next Monday or would I like to pick it up?

    I managed to not break too many speed limits on the way to the post office (if you never fall below the speed limit during the entire trip, that counts as only one violation, right?), and was shortly unpacking the big box in my garage. It appeared to have gotten a medium amount of pounding from China to here, but was serviceable, and after unpacking I didn't see anything that appeared to be broken or missing. I'd say it was well enough packed. I could see ways to do it better, but OTOH the proof is in the pudding: It got here apparently intact.

    The tire on the 700c wheel is a Cheng Shin 700Cx40, looks pretty rugged. Normal street tread, not a knobby or a slick. Inflation pressure is listed as 50-75 psi, not quite what I'm used to with the Continental Ultrasport 700Cx25's on the target Trek 7500 bike with 116 psi, but it might take fast, sharp bumps a little better I suppose. The 700c rim has a label saying "Vigour 2008 Samson Alloy". Appears to be a double-wall rim, tall, almost an aero rim. Daoji put a standard tube with Schrader valve, perhaps it should have an extended Schrader valve, we'll see. Spokes are noticeably thicker and heavier than the "normal" spokes I have on most of my cruiser and road bikes, good news. I hope my multiple spoke wrench fits them. Wheel appears to be properly strung, no up-and-down loping, only a slight side-to-side wobble, very minor. All spokes are tight, probably to a degree proper for such thick spokes.

    The hubmotor is black in color, and does not have the three silver bands I've seen in pictures (nor just the one wide silver band some vendors show in their ads) - just solid shiny black. There are no labels or other markings anywhere on the hub motor, except for engraved letters around one rim edge saying HBS-48V1000W09100267 . No manufacturer's logo, no other specs, nada. All the wires come out thru a hollow axle. None of the wires sppears to be larger than about 16ga, not even the ones supplying drive power. Pumping 30 amps thru them during hill climbs could get interesting.

    The power-cutoff brake handles and thumb throttle fit the 7500's handlebars perfectly. Brake handles appear to be aluminum alloy, not pot metal as someone reported a while back. They look plenty strong enough to me - and that's from someone who weighs 260# and has been known to lift the back tire an inch or so off the pavement during rapid stops. I found a slight problem in that the thumb throttle's lever sticks out just between the two triggers on the Shimano dual-trigger shifter that came stock on thei Trek 7500. At first I thought it was a perfect location. But then realized the the frontmost shift lever, sticks out farther than the rearmost, and interferes with the thumb throttle lever. Scooting the thumb throttle about 3/4" outboard, mostly solved the problem, now the throttle works thru its entire range and both triggers shift as they should, but that frontmost shift trigger is still tough to reach. We'll see how that shakes out.

    The wheel dropped right into the rear dropouts on my Trek 7500 (17.5" men's frame) as though it was desiged for that bike. The hubmotor is actually narrower than the original non-motor hub in the Trek's stock wheel. The flat part of the axle fit perfectly into the dropout slot, a big plus for resisting torque, tho0ugh I will use a steel torque arm too, which I consider a necessity for this 1000W motor. The axle nuts are larger than I'm used to, and actually exceeded the jaw capacity of my 6" Crescent wrench, so I used by 8" which happens to be from China too.

    The controller is unmarked - no logos, specs, serial numbers, or anything else, it's completely anonymous. It's in an aluminum case with some very shallow fins. The openings where the wires come out are pretty well sealed against water intrusion by silicon rubber cement, ansd the end plates are gasketed with very thin rubber gaskets.

    The kit came with no instructions whatsoever. All the plugs are plugged, in, so I will make a diagram of them before unplugging anything. Still haven't figured out what the red button on the thumb throttle is for, maybe an emergency power cutoff? When you press it once, it goes all the way in, you hear a faint click, and it springs out maybe halfway. Press it again, it goes all the way in, another click, and then it springs all the way out. Pretty clearly a push-on, push-off button. Would have been nice if they'd dropped a piece of paper into the box explaining these things, and maybe with a wiring diagram at least, for inquisitive people who start unplugging things.

    My first impression without having actually run it (no battery yet): daoji666 at YXM Corp. designed a good, pretty-easy-to-assemble kit, delivered exactly what was ordered, did a good enough packing job, took sufficient care when assembling the wheel, got the lacing right, and did an overall good job. They are high on my quality list so far.

    The rim sent by YXM Corp. is considerably wider than a "normal" 700C rim, a good thing since an E-bike rim is both going fasterand carrying a heavier load. I had to change the spacing on the V-brakes on the rear wheel to accomodate this - an easy thing on a Trek 7500, just a mattter of changing washers.

    The part of the rim where the brake pads actually press, is unusual: Where most wheel rim surfaces are shiny and smooth, this rim has very thin groove running circumferentially. Looks almost like the surface of an old vinyl phonograph record (I might be dating myself here - how many of you are old enough to remember vinyl phonograph records?). I don't know if this will accelerate brake wear or not - the grooves run in the direction the wheel in spinning, so one would think they would simply carve tiny grooves in the brake pads themselves.

    Normally I use the front brake all the time anyway, and seldom use the rear. But at the speeds and weights this bike might wind up handling, I may need all the brakes I can get. I may eventually convert the front wheel to a disk brake. At minimum this will take a new hug and possibly a full set of new, slightly shorter, spokes. And maybe if I have brain 1 in my head, I will just hunt up a duplicate of this thicker, wider rim YXM sent me, and the same thicker spokes to boot.

    One odd thing about this rear hubmotor: There appear to be TWO mounts for multi-gear freewheels, one on each side! Daoji put a standard 14-28 five-speed freewheel on the left side, whch is normal (I might replace it with a freewheel that has an 11 or 12 tooth smallest cog, we'll see). Not sure what the screw-on mount on the other side of the hubmotor is for. I've never worked with a disc brake on a bicycle, and this hubmotor doesn't have one. I wonder if that right-side screw-on mount can be used to somehow mount a brake disc? Today a friend told me that that is what it is: a screw-on mount for certain brands of disc brake. And he showed me an adapter that screws onto it and provides the standard six-bolt pattern that most present-day bicycle disc brakes have. We'll see.

    So far so good. Now, I wonder when the battery from EP-Battery will get here (shipped Nov. 5 from China, they said. EP_Battery is a different company from YXM, no relation that I know of).

    I'll post some pictures soon.
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  2. #2
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    hi sounds like you have the same kit as myself only mine is 26 inch front hub. as for the kit it is very rugged and tough. good speeds and torque. dont worry about the wires they are fine under load but do get a little warm. some advice keep your controller out in the open . i had mine in my bag to start and it got very hot. also it does tend to blow fuses under load sometimes can be bad if your out and have no spares. i have taken mine out altogether no problems since. if you make sure all contacts are covered with electrical tape or similar riding in rain is fine. post some pics soon cheers crimsonsnake.

  3. #3
    Senior Member nwmtnbkr's Avatar
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    Congratulations. If you didn't get torque arms, you might consider buying some. (To be safe, torque arms should be used on any hub motor, front or rear mounted. Even steel dropouts can fail, just not as frequently as aluminum.) One of the biggest complaints about Chinese manufacturing standards on electric motors is that gauge of wire they use is too small. Over time, you could experience some problems so you might want to hit the throttle gently. I suspect the red button is a kill switch, a good safety feature to have. Remember to make sure everything is waterproof, including the thumb throttle (they can get stuck in the open position, which can be bad). There are some videos on You Tube posted by Power-In-Motion on how to waterproof your e-bike. (Standard, electrical tape or silicon on wires; you can use regular plastic wrap you get at the grocery store along with a hair dryer for the thumb throttle.) Here's a link to the video describing using plastic wrap to waterproof the thumb throttle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Cl96QyfAOw Enjoy but ride safe.

  4. #4
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    Dont remove the covers on that kit. You wont like what you see. Everything is kept in place with industrail glue...

    I am very interested in how you are going to mount your battery. With that kit you are looking at a 48v/20ah at minimum. I have built a good few Trek hybrids for people. I try to deter them from running a 48v/1000w setup because of the frames on those bikes. With a good rack and bag the bikes always twist hardcore and they are known to crack the frames at the back of the crank with heavy riders and or touring loadouts.

    I highly recomend a backpack for your battery in your situation.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    I took some pictures of the kit, partially mounted on a Trek 7500.

    See them at http://endless-sphere.com/forums/vie...hp?f=3&t=14231 .
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  6. #6
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    The part of the rim where the brake pads actually press, is unusual: Where most wheel rim surfaces are shiny and smooth, this rim has very thin groove running circumferentially. [...] I don't know if this will accelerate brake wear or not - the grooves run in the direction the wheel in spinning, so one would think they would simply carve tiny grooves in the brake pads themselves.
    These tiny grooves actually improve the braking effect (ever so slightly). It's used to increase the "swept area" of the brake contact surface.


  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    ausGeoff, sounds good. I was wondering if they also improve braking in the rain.

    Here in San Diego, I'm not too likely to be riding in the rain. But my wife and I went to China last June, got caught in a thunderstorm during a bicycle trip... and still saw some people buzzing merrily by on powered bikes, rain or no rain. Fewer than during dry weather, but they didn't all vanish. It's a fact of life there.

    The older bikes I used to ride (steel or aluminum rims), had pretty good brakes in dry weather... but when they got wet, the brakes completely vanished. Scary. Riding in a big city like Beijing or Shanghai, in heavy traffic including LOTS of bikes, and having your brakes go away, would make me get off and walk. If I could get it stopped.

    BTW, some friends over at endless-sphere just pointed out, that mine is the only rear hubmotor they've ever seen that has the cables coming out of the axle on the SAME side as the freewheel. I took a quick look at a lot of other pictures of various hubmotors, and every single one had the cables on the OTHER side from the freewheel. That, plus the fact that this hubmotor appears to have two screw-on mounts for a freewheel (maybe one is for a disc brake?), one on each side... made me drop a line to the people I bought it from. Should be an interesting answer.
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  8. #8
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
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    If it's many parallel grooves, it may increase brake pad wear a lot, and here's why:

    if the wheel were absolutely round, there would be no problem. But the wheel is guaranteed to be a tiny bit out of round no matter what you do. The grooves potentially pull little bits off of the brake pad, in similar fashion to if you had a rim whose outer surface was covered in DIAGONAL grooves or shallow razor blades running diagonally.
    Some awesome folks who are working to give Haitians the ability to manage their safety and their lives:
    Haiti Partners

  9. #9
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    I would not worry about brake pads to much. With a 48v/1000w kit you should be looking into a disc brake kit asap.

  10. #10
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    Today, Christmas Eve Day, the postman (looking very tired) delivered a heavy package, rather scrunched looking, with Chinese writing all over it. Inside was the 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 battery, a BMS with a big Vpower sticker on it, and a charger with another Vpower sticker.

    Right out of the shipping box, the battery voltage measured 52.9V, occasionally showed 53A (digital Fluke multimeter). Plugged the battery into the charger and plugged it all in. There are two LEDs on the charger, one showed red and the other showed yellow. After about 10 minutes, the yellow one turned green. A few minutes after that, it turned yellow again, and kept cycling every minute or two. Unplugged everything, wondering if the battery were already charged, even after nearly 2 months at sea. Battery voltage at this point was around 57V.

    Whipped out the tools, put a plywood pad on the back rack, connected up what was needed, bungeed the battery onto the back rack, and did thisanthat until I felt ready to try it out. Plugged in the thick black/red wires from the BMS to the conttroller, and the three lights on the thumb throttle came on brightly. Cables hanging all over the place, a few VERY bad solder joints, but I just hadda. Pressed the thumb throttle very gently, nothing. Pressed it further, still nothing. Pressed all the way, nada.

    Noticed I still had a lot of black plastic electricians tape around the thumb throttle, left from when I was standing the bike on its handlebars and seat, installing electrical things. Some of it was wrapped around the red mystery button. Peeled it all off, tried the thumb throttle lightly, still nothing. Pressed the red mystery button, which went in, clicked, and then stayed most of the way in. Pressed the thumb throttle slightly, and the bike bumped forward and made a humming sound.

    Making my own humming sound, I trundled it out into the driveway (this e-bike ain't light), checked over everything fearfully, straddled it, and pushed offf. Pedalled up to speed, pressed the thumb throttle, and it picked up nicely. Tooled around the neighborhood with wires etc. flapping in the breeze, then pulled onto a nearby straight stretch. Sun was well down by now, and I kept a lookout for low-flying reindeer. Pedalled from a standing start, then opened the throttle. Bike was up to 15-20 pretty quickly. Went down to the end of the street, slowed down for a U-turn, and came back. This time I held the throttle wide open. As I passed under a street light near the end, saw the speedometer saying 23.3 MPH.

    Not as much as I expected, but which that disgracefully sloppy, slapdash installation I had done, I was grateful it ran at all. This answers one question: the power cables do indeed come out the correct side of the hubmotor, even if they have to go through the chain.

    A VERY satisfying day. Put the bike away, after removing the battery (with all that weight so high, it falls over with the original kickstand, that's next on the wish list). Took the family to see San Diego's Christmas Card Lane, which is about 2 miles from my house.

    Ho ho ho! My first e-bike is a reality! Needs some adjustments and a lot of cleaning up, but the eagle has landed!

    Coupla questions for you gurus out there:

    What do the LEDs mean on this 5A 48V VPower charger? One stayed red all the time I had it powered. The other started out yellow as it charged the battery for a bit, then started cycling between yellow and green, about once per minute. Does this mean the battery is fully charged?

    Andd, should all three lights on the thumb throttle, be on at the same time? I thought the top one (green) meant the battery was fairly full; middle one (yellow) means it's starting to run out, and bottom one (red) means it is getting near exhausted. Do I have the wrong idea about this? What does it mean when all three are on at once, and staying that way?

    Thanks, all!
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  11. #11
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    Well, did some cleaning up, replaced a connector for the Hall-effect-sensor wires I had messed up, mounted the WattsUp Meter on the handlebars (ran the high-amperage 12ga drive wires all the way from the battery to the handlebars and back to the controller under the seat, not elegant but did not seem to affect performance), faired all Ebike wires under a shield mounted under the top tube. Bought a BUNCH of zip ties, both white and black to blend in with the bike's paint job (obvious tiewraps look tacky), folded all the too-long wires fairly neatly on top of the controller and ziptied them, got rid of the power-brake handles and put back the original brake levers that came on this Trek 7500, MUCH better braking. Two bungee cords holding the battery down (battery box is on next-to-build list), tucked in the charger cord, made everything nice and pretty. Also inflated the tires - rear from the 30psi I found it at (oops!) to 75, front to the 116psi it's rated for.

    It was dark once again, so I ran it up and down the same street, this time the street light showed me 27mph. Pretty smooth, motor seemed a little torquey-er, though maybe that was the rear tire. This thing is starting to feel like a bike. Still pretty heavy, though, and that won't change.

    Then today, I just got back from screwing around in the parking lot at work during lunch. That parking lot sure seems big when I'm walking across it after work, but got small pretty fast as e-bike speeds exceeded 25mph. The 11-32 7-speed freewheel from Pat at San Diego Electric Bike (619-216-8572) is a BIG help when accelerating to a top speed, before backing off to coast at full throttle and see if the bike holds that speed. Pat is a great guy, very knowledgeable on e-bikes, but laid back and humorous at the same time.

    Got it up to 25mph in the parking lot (mostly empty during the Christmas holiday), and it seemed to be trying to accelerate further when I coasted with full throttle, but I had to back down to slow to turning speed. WattsUp meter told me the battery was putting out from 49.9 to 51 volts throughout, even when accelerating. Maximum amps I saw were 28A briefly, 27A more often during acceleration, then dropping off of course as I slowed (this bike has no regeneration capability, KISS).

    Then took it over to a nearby street in an industrial area, which was pretty much empty during this holiday. It looked pretty much level to me, but I did runs in both directions just in case (they turned out to be nearly identical anyway, wind was across the road at an almost perfect right angle). Highest continuous speed I got out of it was 29.6 MPH, same in both directions. And it would frequently get up to that speed with no pedaling at all! Pretty awesome. When going that speed, I saw 23 Amps on the WattsUp Meter, and battery voltage of 49.7V. The lowest battery voltage I ever saw, while beating on it repeatedly, was 48.6V. I LOVE this 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 battery!!!

    Biggest problem I'm now having, is that when the bike hits a bump, I hear a loud WHACK from behind me, soounds like the battery bouncing up and down on the plywood platform I put on the back rack. This happens even at lower speeds, like 8mph. I have some dense foam material from Walmart (camping ground pad, about 1/2" thick), and will cut a piece to go between battery and platform. Eventually I'll build a battery box, probably folding it out of 1/16" aluminum so it can mount the On/Off switch and fusible link, both of which aren't being used yet.

    So far so good - a VERY cool ebike. Top speed nearly 30mph on level ground with no pedaling, even when hauling my sizeable posterior (I'm 265#) and the heavy battery and motor. I'll get some total weights soon.

    Don't have any total-range figures yet. I want to fix that loud WHACK before taking it anyplace serious, public roads around here are often bumpy and broken, especially at the sides. Also want to mount the WattsUp meter properly, rubberbanding it to the handlebars like it is now is _so_ uncool.
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  12. #12
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    First cruise of any length today. Actually it was more of a let's-beat-on-it-for-long-times-and-see-how-it-does run. Started from my house, pulled onto a long, fairly new dedicated bike path leading to near the sea. A few upsies, some long, gentle downsies, there just isn't much level ground of any kind in San Diego. Net elevation change was down, maybe a hundred feet or so over four miles. Did most of it at full throttle. 20mph up the brief upsies, exceeding 30mph on the long, gentle downsies.

    Blew by a husband and wife on their drop-bar road bikes like they were standing still, they were going maybe 20mph on one of the long gentle downsies. Ran another mile to my turnaround spot, and stopped to take some notes. The husband and wife came along, and slowed to look closely at my bike. He asked, "How did you do that?" I replied, "I cheated." We had a talk about ebikes, they seemed encouraged.

    They turned around and started back up, I finished my notes and started back up too. They were cranking earnestly in fairly low gears up the slope that had been a gentle downsie and was now an upsie, I blew by again with no pedaling, could hear them laughing.

    On the way back, I was going mostly uphill of course, up long, gentle slopes that occasionally got less gentle, plus a few shorter downsies. The ebike never went below 19mph, and me not pedalling (deliberately). Passed my house, kept going up a long, somewhat-steeper hill about a mile long, to a street intersection.

    Stopped and got off at that point, and felt the motor housing, controller, BMS, and battery. The motor was warm to the touch, but not hot at all. Everything else was cool. Air temperature outside was around +55F. The WattsUp meter had never shown a battery voltage below 48V. Currents on the long, gentle downsies were around 20-23A, full throttle all the way of course. Going the other way, speeds around 20mph, currents were 27-28A.

    Went back home from the street intersection at the top of the hill, letting the bike coast with throttle mostly closed. From the bottom of that hill to the house was maybe 1/2 mile, more upsies than downsies for the last short stretch.

    Total distance for this excursion was 11.2 miles. The WattsUp meter said I had used 8.175 Ampere-hours, all of it at 48 to 50 volts.

    From this, I figure that, when beating on the bike as hard as possible and riding lots of hills, I'd get maybe 25 miles on a full charge in this 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 battery, before the BMS started cutting out on me. If I stay on mostly-flatter roads and back off on the throttle a little, and cruise at maybe 25mph (as I will when communting to work), I hope a range of 30 miles on a full charge, isn't unreasonable.
    Last edited by Little-Acorn; 01-01-10 at 12:39 AM.
    '72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, original except for seat and 116psi tires
    48V 1000W black unbanded rear hubmotor kit from YXM Corp, 48V 20Ah LiFePO4 batt
    '79 Schwinn Twinn Sport 10sp tandem, 47#, now 14-speed with 12/34, aero wheels
    '07 Trek 7700 hybrid, 27sp, 20" frame, Conti UltraSport 700Cx28 116# tires, sweet
    '04 Trek 7500 hybrid, 17.5" frame, soon to be 48V 1000W rear-hubmotor electric bike

  13. #13
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    Hello. I also biought this same kit. Had some questions

    Hello. i bought this exact same kit off ebay and had some questions and was wondering if you could give me any pointers. I bought a TREK 800 to put it on and it's a rear wheel hub motor.

    - Should I get torque arms to put on the back?

    - Where's the best place to mount the controller?

    - Should I use the brake/motor-cutoffs it came with, or do I not need to worry about using them? Can I get away with just using the brake handles it came with, or do I really need the motor cutoff feature?

    - Should I use the thumb or twist throttle?

    - Should I mount the 48v 20AH battery on the rear rack, or would it be too heavy?

    - I finally found out that with the battery cable, the red goes to brown and the black goes to blue. What's the best way to connect these together? Should I use a couple wire screw caps? Should I solder it first? Is there a better connector to use?

    - What tips do I need to know for getting the FASTEST speed possible? Is there anything I need to note that will prevent me from obtaining the max speed? I would like to be able to get it up to 30mph. I live on a highway and am 3 miles out of town. I want to be able to ride at least 30mph down this stretch until I get to town. Any tips?

    - I'm not all too familiar with electronics. Would a WattsUp meter hurt my voltage or amps at all? What would be the easiest way to hook it up?

    Anyways....if you could answer any of these questions, that'd be excellent! I'd really appreciate it. I don't really expect you to answer all of them, as I know I asked a lot. But if you could answer some of the important ones if it's not too much trouble, that'd be great! Thanks again! I have a Youtube channel going documenting the process of my Ebike. It is:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/ebikeguy26

    Check it out. Email me! Post to me on youtube! Take care!

    -Mike

  14. #14
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    ive got the same kit..ordered it around jan of this year...

    I had one problem...the controller blew out on the first 5 miles of riding time...so i went ahead and spent $130 for a updated/upgraded lyen controller off of endless sphere forum...

    I weigh around 270 lbs and my bike weighs 70 lbs..and i can get up to 32 mph on flat/level paved surfaces/roads...but most of the time i stay around 18 mph for best efficiency and decent distance covered.

    I have solid airless tires and have my 20 lb battery mounted on back using a seatpost mounted rack and a strip[ of aluminium mounted to the rack and the rear axle stud. So far there havent been any problems from having the battery mounted this way...

    I also just rigged up a front rack coming off the handlebars , so I can carry a grocery bag. I will try to get pictures of its current state of being, on here this week.

  15. #15
    Newbie vpower.hk's Avatar
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    Hi Little-Acorn ,

    There are two led light on charger .
    Red : power light . It will be always on .
    Yellow : When charging , it turns orange .Full charged , it turns green.

    If you bought 48v 20ah , the charger is 5AH , you need to charge for 4 hours .

    If you have any questions, you can contact us at sosomum@gmail.com

    Vpower.hk

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