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Old 11-27-09, 10:23 PM   #1
cvenstrom
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Mounting cyclone motor

I mounted my 1200 watt cyclone 3 chain motor on an old bike. I think I am going to love it when I find a better way to mount the motor. I used the bracket that comes with it, tightened up the bolt & the set screws securely, but when I start out if I don't pedal a little & give very little power to the motor it rotates & throws the chain from the motor off. I have the bolts so tight that when the chain came off a few blocks from home, I laid the bike over on its side & stood on the motor trying to rotate it back to the correct position, but it didn't budge. The point is I had the motor brackets were pretty tight, but the motor still rotates on the bike frame.
Any suggestions other than welding the motor bracket to the frame?

Thanks Carlsbad Carl
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Old 11-27-09, 11:19 PM   #2
nwmtnbkr
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I mounted my 1200 watt cyclone 3 chain motor on an old bike. I think I am going to love it when I find a better way to mount the motor. I used the bracket that comes with it, tightened up the bolt & the set screws securely, but when I start out if I don't pedal a little & give very little power to the motor it rotates & throws the chain from the motor off. I have the bolts so tight that when the chain came off a few blocks from home, I laid the bike over on its side & stood on the motor trying to rotate it back to the correct position, but it didn't budge. The point is I had the motor brackets were pretty tight, but the motor still rotates on the bike frame.
Any suggestions other than welding the motor bracket to the frame?

Thanks Carlsbad Carl
Slippage is a known problem. Here's a thread from another forum where cyclone owners discuss possible solutions. Good luck. I think you'll love your e-bike. http://endless-sphere.com/forums/vie...p?f=28&t=13733
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Old 11-28-09, 07:53 AM   #3
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1200 watts on a crankwheel? This is the stuff that will get us legislated out of existence IMO. Your frame is probably not up to the forces involved. You're dealing with a level of power that your frame was never intended to endure on that mounting location. My suggestion is to find and/or build a suitable frame - obviously the one you're using isn't. be very careful...
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Old 11-28-09, 06:53 PM   #4
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1200 watts on a crankwheel? This is the stuff that will get us legislated out of existence IMO. Your frame is probably not up to the forces involved. You're dealing with a level of power that your frame was never intended to endure on that mounting location. My suggestion is to find and/or build a suitable frame - obviously the one you're using isn't. be very careful...
I'm more worried about the over-powered hub motors people are using, especially on front wheels since no forks were designed to hand that kind of torque. In several threads, I've posted a link to a picture of failed drop outs on an aluminum fork--torque arms didn't prevent that failure. Steel forks are vulnerable to failure due to torque, too.
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Old 11-28-09, 08:28 PM   #5
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I'm more worried about the over-powered hub motors people are using, especially on front wheels since no forks were designed to hand that kind of torque. In several threads, I've posted a link to a picture of failed drop outs on an aluminum fork--torque arms didn't prevent that failure. Steel forks are vulnerable to failure due to torque, too.
Do you know what would be the upper limit for a hub motor on the front? Mine is 400 watts.
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Old 11-28-09, 09:30 PM   #6
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Do you know what would be the upper limit for a hub motor on the front? Mine is 400 watts.
With torque arms, you're probably fine. There are some 1000W motors that some people are mounting on front wheels. I'd be worried about the level of torque they produce. Heck, I'd be worried about the level of torque they'd produce on a rear wheel too, but at least the rear wheel area might be able to better handle it. I don't really want to go motorcycle speeds on an e-bike, but there are some who seem to want to go as fast as they can. I'd really want to have disc brakes on both wheels if I put a 1000W kit of any kind on a bike.
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