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  1. #1
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    Ecoped City45, is it worthy?

    Hello!
    I lived in Montreal since last August. Until the winter arrive, I used a hybrid bike for commuting, but for longer distances I've been using public transportation. I've been thinking of using a scooter or an ebike, for longer distances or when I have to carry groceries.
    Since I'm not interested on buying a car, I decided to buy a scooter or an ebike, not decided which one yet.
    I want to know your opinions about Ecoped City45. It's not expensive, price is $1000.
    Which are pros and cons of scooters compare with ebikes?
    Thanks in advance for your help.

  2. #2
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    You know what I think are the best kind of commercial e-bikes? The ones where you can replace wheels with regular off-the-shelf wheels. Because eventually the motor or something will break on it, and it would nice to be able to eventually upgrade the motor by yourself and keep riding it.

    E-mail them and ask them what size the front wheel is and ask them if the front rim breaks, can it be replaced by a normal/standard mountain bike rim or cycling rim that you buy at a normal bike shop. If he says yes, then if the motor breaks down or you want to upgrade it to make it faster, you can buy a front wheel hub motor and motor batteries and make it a lot faster or just maintain it. In other words, it would still have value if it breaks down. You could take out the front rim/wheel and put a hub motor in it and keep using it as an electric bike. Great thing about this bike is that there is plenty of room for batteries. That's why I think the eGO cycle is also a good bike because it looks like you could take one of those wheels out and put in your own motor and make it faster if you wanted to. Might check out the eGO cycle also but I'm not sure if they are still being sold.

  3. #3
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    The only way I'd ever buy a commercial e-bike is if it was modifiable in some way. The Ecoped bike looks like it has moped wheels so it might not very easy to install a front hub motor on it. Moped wheels are different from bicycle wheels.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your advice. I have about 20 years biking (conventional bikes), but my knowledge of ebikes is scarced. Could you tell me which are pros and cons of scooters compare with ebikes?

  5. #5
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    I live in Indianapolis. Do you live in Indianapolis? If you live in Indiana, you probably don't live in an area that's very friendly toward bicycles or e-bikes. There's virtually no bicycle lanes in Indianapolis. I've built two electric bikes. My #1 priority for both of them was that it had to be fast because cars don't want to wait on you and the less cars that pass you, the safer you are in the long run.

    If you are talking about electric scooters that are commercial and ready-to-use then most of them are going to be very slow with a top speed of 20 mph. One of my ebikes goes 31 mph at 60v and the other goes 35 mph at 48v. I just think 20 mph is too slow unless you live in a city that is friendly toward bicycles. If indianapolis had bicycle lanes, I wouldn't mind buying a commercial e-bike or commercially made scooter.


    Pros of commercially made scooters or e-bikes

    ****************************

    lockable battery box.....comes with pretty much theft proof design

    very easy to use, just switch it on....ride...park it ....then ride again...


    Cons of comercially made

    ********************

    too slow for non-friendly bicycle areas...worst feeling in the world is getting your new e-bike out on the road and realize that you are getting your ass kicked by traffic because you're too slow.

    might even be too slow for your own personal satisfaction

    Expensive...for the same price you can build one of your own that has twice the power and twice the range

    Is it possible to actually pedal it? some commercial e-bikes have pedals but are way too heavy to pedal.


    Pros of Do-it-yourself

    ********************

    cheaper

    you can make it as powerful as you want

    Easy to pedal because it's just a bike with a 15 lb motor on it and some batteries. I can pedal mine at 15 mph easily and I'm not even a strong bike rider.


    Cons of DIY

    ***********

    need to make batteries theft-proof or at least some kind of quick-release to take batteries with you


    My biggest worry is just theft. I still haven't theft-proof my e-bike yet but I will do that this year. It will only cost me about $80. I just need to buy a lockable box and a piece for my rack and then that's it. I had to buy a chain for it too but I already bought that. If I live in like Seattle, I might consider buying a commercial e-bike because they have bike paths everywhere but here in Indiana, it's just not a bike friendly area. However, if you have some specific plan of where you want to ride your bike and it doesn't involve dangerous roads, I don't see anything wrong with buying a commercial bike. If I bought one, though I'd like it to be modifiable so I can at least upgrade it myself or work on it myself rather than to have to ship it somewhere or take it to a bike shop. The whole reason I got into e-bikes was because I hated taking my car in and getting some outrageous repair bill. I like the idea that I can work on my e-bike by myself and fix whatever is needed. Here is my e-bike if you are interested.



    Last edited by morph999; 02-15-10 at 10:45 PM.

  6. #6
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    I bought one of these to secure my bike....I love this chain. It's over 5 ft long, I can lock my bike to any telephone pole or just about anything anywhere and you see the mid-frame bag on my bike? It fits in there just barely. The mid-frame bag is a bag that I got from Nashbar (online website).
    It's Onguard 5018 chain...it's one of the thickest you can find. It's either 14mm or 12mm thick, can't remember. The thickest one you can buy is something called The Immboliser and it's about 16 mm thick. Anyway, what I'm going to do is buy a lockable box for my lifepo4 batteries then loop this chain through the handle of the box...around a tree then back through the frame or rim of my bike and then secure it that way.

  7. #7
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    Well, you can't pedal scooters, so you might as well get a small motorcycle. Electric bikes are bicycles first, so if the motor quits or you want to increase distance or get some exercise, just pedal.

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