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Old 04-20-10, 08:14 AM   #1
GTR2EBIKE
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Hi-power cycles Anyone have experience with them

Does any one here have past experiences with hi-power cycles, good or bad looking to hear it all.
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Old 04-20-10, 02:15 PM   #2
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Is there anyone else or another company someone would recommend looking into?
I'm looking for a fast reliable e-bike and there "40 mph" bike sounds like a good amount of speed to me. Anyone you know of that builds one with a similar or higher speed?
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Old 04-20-10, 04:50 PM   #3
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Hi-power Cycles has been around a while. They seem to be a pretty good company except for being pretty expensive. I think they are in Australia so that's one reason why the prices are higher. If you want to go 40 mph, I think you are better off with a motorcycle. The wind resistance above about 28 mph is really rough on your range and speed. Above 28 mph, the amount of money you spend to go faster is pretty much exponential and is the power required.

I haven't looked at their prices lately but I know from the past that their batteries are pretty much 3x more expensive than if you bought them yourself from hobbyking.com . The batteries they sell are basically just LIPO but they sell $400 batteries for $1000. You could put your own bike together for probably half the cost unless you are buying one of their custom made ones. In the beginning, I wanted to go 40 mph but it's just so expensive and after riding my electric bike for a year, I don't mind going 25 mph. If you do want to go 40 mph, LIPO batteries is probably your best bet, though.

You could probably do 40 mph with probably 72v 15AH LIPO pack and 48amp controller with a 5303 hub motor or a 2806 nine continent. I've gotten my 5303 hub motor bike up to 35 mph on 48v with a 35 amp controller but it took a while.

EDIT: I just looked at their website. I guess some of their batteries are lifepo4. If you want to go 40 mph, I'd still probably use LIPO to do it. If you want to go slower, I'd use lifepo4.
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Old 04-20-10, 04:58 PM   #4
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Is there anyone else or another company someone would recommend looking into?
I'm looking for a fast reliable e-bike and there "40 mph" bike sounds like a good amount of speed to me. Anyone you know of that builds one with a similar or higher speed?
First, if you're in the US, federal law requires that ready made e-bikes with motors over 750W or that can travel at speeds of over 20 MPH meet moped/motorcyle safety regulations promulgated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). There aren't many of these types of e-bikes ready-made and in many, many states an e-bike this powerful will be classified as a moped and have to be licensed and insured (you may have to have a motorcycle license to operate it, too). The vast majority of ready-made e-bikes sold in the US meet the definition of "low-speed electric bicycles," which is defined as "a two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph." These bicycles only have to meet safety standards for regular bicycles set by the Consumer Product Safety Administration. (This distinction between e-bikes was contained in Public Law 107-319, enacted in 2002, and was the result of lobbying by big bicycle manufacturers after the NHTSA asserted the right to set safety standards for all electric bicycles sold in the US. The definition of low-speed electric bicycles meets the fairly uniform manufacturing standards that the industry has set to ensure that the electric bicycles rolling off their production lines can be shipped anywhere, including the EU and those parts of Asia that have strict limits on the power and speed of street-legal e-bikes. At present, conversion kits aren't covered by these safety regulations, but I expect to see that change as more powerful hub motor kits get shipped from China. FYI, Congress has left it up to the 50 states to determine whether e-bikes should be allowed to operate on public roads. One state, New York, bans the use of e-bikes on public roads.)

Now, if you truly want a high-speed, ready-made e-bike be prepared to open up your wallet. You will pay a premium because these bikes must meet NHTSA standards. They will have beefier, better frames and brakes. One such bike, which is also hand-made in the US, is the Optibike. You will pay almost as much as you would for a motorcycle. Again, your state may treat it as a moped, too. These bikes get a good review, but I would hope so since many models sell for $10,000 or more. http://optibike.com/

E+ Electric Bikes, based in Reston, VA, sells e-bikes that have been converted with high-speed motors. They used to market bikes with special frames but seem to now use bike frames they've bought off the economy (whether this is a sign that their sales have fallen significantly in the recession, I don't know). I'm not sure how they're able to meet NHTSA standards. It really doesn't look like they've modified the bikes frames and brakes to meet moped safety standards. However, their prices are more reasonable. http://epluselectricbike.com/

You should be concerned about safety with any bike, but especially an e-bike and more importantly one that can go extremely fast. I'd be hesitant to buy an e-bike that can travel over 20 MPH if it doesn't have a beefier frame and brakes. Putting a powerful motor on an unmodified bicycle engineered for human power, not a motor, is a disaster in the making, IMHO.

Good luck. Take time to educate yourself. I would suggest you do some reading on the Endless Sphere forums. http://endless-sphere.com/forums
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Old 04-20-10, 07:07 PM   #5
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I am not to concerned with getting pulled over for riding a bicycle. However safety is another issue
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Old 04-21-10, 12:22 PM   #6
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I am not to concerned with getting pulled over for riding a bicycle. However safety is another issue
My point is those vendors selling ready-made (i.e., fully-assembled e-bikes) must comply with federal law. If you're wanting to buy one already assembled that can travel over 20MPH, to be sold legally, the e-bike must comply with NHTSA's moped/motorcycle safety regulations. That's why most hobbyists who want greater speeds build their own. Again, at present conversion kits aren't caught up by these safety regulations.
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Old 04-21-10, 12:35 PM   #7
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I am not to concerned with getting pulled over for riding a bicycle. However safety is another issue
You'll require a full suspension frame for that kind of speed. Make sure you have disc brakes, etc. I'd want to wear a DOT motorcycle helmet for those speeds too. Also it is not cheap to go that fast.
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Old 04-22-10, 06:25 PM   #8
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True that, from first hand experience - you can think of a lot when you are flying through the air. I suggest taking a few days of Judo lessons to learn how to land properly.

My two cents'
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Old 10-29-14, 07:08 PM   #9
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ATTENTION: HPC is terrible; do not buy from them. DO NOT BUY FROM HPC


I recently bought the hardtail bike from HPC. They would not listen to me when I requested they make my tires tubeless; instead they said they would put triple-thick tubes and kevlar liners in there. They did not put the kevlar liners, and I just got a flat. They continued to make excuses for not putting in the kevlar liners. They also forgot to send the rack with the bike, which I had ordered.


One ****ty thing about the hub motors is they have a lot of drag to them. This means pedaling the bike without power is absolutely terrible. It's like pedaling through very thick mud. The bike is essentially useless unless you have power.


HPC exaggerates their range by about 100%, meaning you can bet on an actual range of about 1/2 the number they report.


They do not understand discharge rates of batteries, so they produce sub-optimal battery systems.


They are very disorganized. Every time I would call to ask a question or request something, it would take them 10 minutes to look up my order. They said the only record tracking they have is in quickbooks.


Although the bike works and wasn't too terrible to set up, I feel very ripped off buying this bike. I bet you could build one yourself, with minimal effort (maybe takes a day or two) for 2K, when the bike from HPC costs 4K. How does 1K/day pay sound to you? You could probably also pay a bike shop to set up the bike for less than $500.


I'm pretty sure these are just some socal brats, the sons of rich mofos, who wanted to ride electric bikes and not work, so they got some money from their parents to start an electric bike company to make it appear to their parents they were working, when in fact, they dick around on e-bikes all day. They do not appear to give a single **** about the customer. So far, Derek is the only one at the company who seems to actually care a little bit.


Oh yeah, and one more thing. For their hardtail, they use the ALITE 500, worth about 800 bucks. This bike is not easy to fit with a rack or fenders, making the bike even more useless and less robust.


So, $800 for the bike, around 1K-1.5K for the battery / motor / charger, 50 bucks for a light, and these guys charge 4K for that. Total rip off and not worth it. Might as well custom build it for now. Although I would recommend a mid-drive so you don't have the ridiculous drag from the hub motor, although I'm not sure there's kits out there for that.


The whole experience has pissed me off so much though that I might start making some of my own. Will let you know asap. :twisted:
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