Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Electric Bikes Here's a place to discuss ebikes, from home grown to high-tech.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-02-13, 04:08 PM   #26
dgk02
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NYC
Bikes:
Posts: 268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Would a kit like this be ok: http://elifebike.com/peng/iview.asp?...-43-GR8W.234ME ?

Hall Sensorless 201 24v - so I just get a 36 volt battery and I guess I'd need a different controller to hook it to that kit? I'm not sure how one runs a 24 volt motor at 36 volts. It doesn't burn out?

The LiFePo4 might be overkill but I suspect the battery will be around longer than the motor. Would another type of battery be significantly lighter and provide around the same power? 30 miles is likely overkill since I do pedal a lot.

Or this kit, which is a 300 motor already at 36 volts?
http://elifebike.com/peng/iview.asp?...-5S-Q4BS.2MJSV

Last edited by dgk02; 09-03-13 at 04:11 AM. Reason: Add Bafang
dgk02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-13, 12:47 PM   #27
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Yep, that first kit will work. The controller will work with 24 or 36 volts (some people run them at 48 volts).

The 24volt and 26 volt motor are basically the same (Well the internal gears are a little different, but the electronics are the same). That motor will run fine on 44 volts nominal (12s lipo) and plenty of people run it at 48v. Its really the current where people run into problems. 15amps is good, 17 is max.

My current favorite battery (as of mid 2013) is the Samsung batteries sold at EM3ev. Its probably 60% of the size and weight of LiFePo4, but only has about 1/3 of the recharge cycles. Choose your poison (size-weight vs recycle times).

If you only need 20+ mile range, a 36v10AH is fine. 25 miles, 12AH, 30 miles 15AH. You can extend this by pedaling of course. (I’m doing 24 miles on 10AH)


You can either use the PAS & thumb-brakes or use the throttle, or use both. Whatever your preferred method, it is a good idea to order spares as they are very cheap, and will take a lot of time (and extra shipping $$$) to order them later. Cheap insurance to buy some spares now.

You basically need:
∑ Motor
∑ Controller
∑ Throttle (if using PAS as a throttle, you need the brake levers to ensure it cuts off under braking)
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-13, 06:45 PM   #28
dgk02
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NYC
Bikes:
Posts: 268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So the controller and throttle limit the amps? If I don't push it too far it should be ok then. And the motor really isn't that expensive but I'd prefer not to kill it.
dgk02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-13, 03:12 PM   #29
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
the controller limits the amps (although the throttle also controls the power delivery). Generally you need to fit a controller that won't burn out your motor. Roughly speaking, Amps is torque, Volts is speed. 36V is 50% faster than 24v, and 48V is 33% faster than 36v. The speed of a motor itself is determined by the number of windings of the motor (i.e. Turns), and the voltage of the battery. But most kits have that matched up pretty well so you don't have to worry about it too much. Just make sure your target top speed is about 85% of the noload speed of the motor (in other words a 200 rpm motor on a 26" wheel will do about 18mph noload, or about 15 mph on the bike with no assistance). Nothing you can do to change that for a given hub motor, unless you increase the voltage.
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 10:40 AM   #30
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Chas, I have a couple questions...

I'm thinking of doing a similar build to speed up my 12 mile commute. I'm in a similar position...reasonably strong rider, cruise in the 15-20mph range on a normal road bike/commuter. Zero hills where I'm at...with the exception of a few small overpasses that I don't mind using leg power to power over.

Can you elaborate on the differences between the 24v 201rpm@36v motor VS the 36v 328rpm motor at 36v?

Lastly...what can you tell me about the Q100H motor? Is it possible the new Q100H at 260rpm would now be better than both the above options for this application?

Thanks in advance

edit: I should probably add I will be running 700c wheels with fast rolling largeish tires...likely 32-38mm.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:08 PM   #31
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
I am currently trying to accomplish something similar...

Would this kit be reasonable if I just want a hill assist at lower speeds? I intend to always be pedaling, and I don't feel like I need any/much assistance at higher speeds on flat ground. Really just want a boost up the hills.

https://bmsbattery.com/ebike-kit/616...ebike-kit.html

I would like to run it with disc brakes, and a 10-speed cassette. Ideally on an aluminum road frame as well!

Or maybe a 250W motor is a better option? Or will that have a hard time pushing me up steeper inclines even at lower speeds like 10-15MPH?
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:10 PM   #32
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
LOL, isnít this post 3 years old?

They are almost the same motor. I think the reduction gears are a little different.

At 300rpm, Iím riding about 23-24mph (mountain bike)
At 328rpm, Iím riding about 25-26mph. About 10% faster (road bike).

I dunno. For some reason I loved the 300rpm unit for a couple of years, but now ride the 328rpm unit. What I really love is having my new light weight battery I had custom built. For 36v10ah, I went from 10lbs to just over 3lbs. Gotta love technology improvements!

To give my standard answer:
Quote:
for the Q100 (or most any small/medium hub motor)
201 rpm has a road speed of roughly 15 mph
260 rpm has a road speed of roughly 20 mph
328 rpm has a road speed of roughly 25 mph (assuming you have enough power).

A stock (36v15amp) Q100 doesn't want to do much more than about 22mph by itself, so getting to 25mph is going to require some help, some extra power.

You can take any of these motors that have a rating at 36v, and multiply it by 1.33 (48/36 = 1.33) to get the speed increase from overvolting it to 48v. Obviously you do this at your own risk.
They didnít make a 260rpm motor 3 years ago Ė although I desperately tried to find a manufacturer that did. I created the 300rpm version (overvolting the 24v version) in an attempt to get as close as I good to 260rpm. So yes, that is a good choice if you want to go about 20mph.

The H motor is a new and improved version that is reported to have a little more torque than the original. I'm not clear on how they could do that, but there are some efficiencies to gain if they really wanted to.

They also have come out with a cassette version (Q100c) if you need more than 7 speeds. That motor is necessarily narrower than the standard freewheel version, so it is a little less happy with running more current or voltage through it than it is rated for. In other words, you can abuse the Q100H version a little more.
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:11 PM   #33
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tegnamo View Post
I am currently trying to accomplish something similar...

Would this kit be reasonable if I just want a hill assist at lower speeds? I intend to always be pedaling, and I don't feel like I need any/much assistance at higher speeds on flat ground. Really just want a boost up the hills.

https://bmsbattery.com/ebike-kit/616...ebike-kit.html

I would like to run it with disc brakes, and a 10-speed cassette. Ideally on an aluminum road frame as well!

Or maybe a 250W motor is a better option? Or will that have a hard time pushing me up steeper inclines even at lower speeds like 10-15MPH?
I'm not sure, but I think that IS a 250 watt motor...the one other sites list as 250-350 watt depending on what voltage you run them at.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:17 PM   #34
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tegnamo View Post
I am currently trying to accomplish something similar...

Would this kit be reasonable if I just want a hill assist at lower speeds? I intend to always be pedaling, and I don't feel like I need any/much assistance at higher speeds on flat ground. Really just want a boost up the hills.

https://bmsbattery.com/ebike-kit/616...ebike-kit.html

I would like to run it with disc brakes, and a 10-speed cassette. Ideally on an aluminum road frame as well!

Or maybe a 250W motor is a better option? Or will that have a hard time pushing me up steeper inclines even at lower speeds like 10-15MPH?
Yes, that is a great option. It will go about 15-16mph by itself. I did full throttle on a 30 minute commute, and hardly used any battery because I was riding at 18mph. Once a hub motor reaches its max road speed, the power falls off sharply (to its noload speed). Above 18mph, the 201rpm motor was not doing anything at all to power the bike. It was all me.

You can go full throttle as long as you keep it above 7mph. If you need to crawl up a hill slower than that, it will eventually overheat.

Yeah, running at 24volts will reduce the tendency to overheat at high load and low speed, but you have 50% more power at 36v versus 24v (that is basically the difference between a 250 watt and a 350 watt motor - its the battery voltage).
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:17 PM   #35
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
LOL, isnít this post 3 years old?

They are almost the same motor. I think the reduction gears are a little different.

At 300rpm, Iím riding about 23-24mph (mountain bike)
At 328rpm, Iím riding about 25-26mph. About 10% faster (road bike).

I dunno. For some reason I loved the 300rpm unit for a couple of years, but now ride the 328rpm unit. What I really love is having my new light weight battery I had custom built. For 36v10ah, I went from 10lbs to just over 3lbs. Gotta love technology improvements!

To give my standard answer:


They didnít make a 260rpm motor 3 years ago Ė although I desperately tried to find a manufacturer that did. I created the 300rpm version (overvolting the 24v version) in an attempt to get as close as I good to 260rpm. So yes, that is a good choice if you want to go about 20mph.

The H motor is a new and improved version that is reported to have a little more torque than the original. I'm not clear on how they could do that, but there are some efficiencies to gain if they really wanted to.

They also have come out with a cassette version (Q100c) if you need more than 7 speeds. That motor is necessarily narrower than the standard freewheel version, so it is a little less happy with running more current or voltage through it than it is rated for. In other words, you can abuse the Q100H version a little more.
Wow these little motors will hold up to 22mph with no help?

I guess my real question is this: Will the 260 rpm motor at 36v push you to 25ish if you switch it on while already pedaling at 20mph, or is the speed limited because of the lower rpm? I have shaky grasp on how these things function lol.

And yeah...old thread, but you seem to still have the best info up on the forums regarding this.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:20 PM   #36
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
I'm not sure, but I think that IS a 250 watt motor...the one other sites list as 250-350 watt depending on what voltage you run them at.
Amusingly, this actually makes sense, because I see on other vendor sites the same basic kit but rated at 250W.

It seems that overall pricing is cheapest from BMS, and sounds like they are able to deliver the goods from what I've read. I have seen some unhappy customer reports, too, but I guess it's part of the game when ordering from China!
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:23 PM   #37
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tegnamo View Post
Amusingly, this actually makes sense, because I see on other vendor sites the same basic kit but rated at 250W.

It seems that shipping is cheapest from BMS, and sounds like they are able to deliver the goods from what I've read. I have seen some unhappy customer reports, too, but I guess it's part of the game when ordering from China!
It also seems like you could order once from China, have it fall in the ocean without being reimbursed, order a second time and still not really pay anymore than with a local store.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:32 PM   #38
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
It also seems like you could order once from China, have it fall in the ocean without being reimbursed, order a second time and still not really pay anymore than with a local store.
Noted. Where is a good place to get a complete kit a la the one from BMS? I am not located near any brick and mortar store, so a US-based distributor with mail/internet order would be preferred.
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:34 PM   #39
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
I don't have an answer for that....I had been planning on going the Chinese route and crossing my fingers.

I've seen more than a few people here get orders fulfilled seemingly with few issues.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:36 PM   #40
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
I don't have an answer for that....I had been planning on going the Chinese route and crossing my fingers.

I've seen more than a few people here get orders fulfilled seemingly with few issues.
The LEED USA Electric Bike Kit | Shop E-Bike Kits Online seems competent and I just talked to their customer support. My friend bought their 250W 10aH kit and it's great I hear. But they do not carry a freehub style rear hub that accepts a more modern cassette. That is a deal killer for me. I know I could probably get away with a 7-speed freewheel but I want to have a finer selection of gears since the ebike system I'm considering isn't super powerful.
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:41 PM   #41
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
It also seems like you could order once from China, have it fall in the ocean without being reimbursed, order a second time and still not really pay anymore than with a local store.
Kinda, maybe. The shipping from BMS battery is going to DOUBLE the price you see listed on the web site. Its still cheap, but not as cheap as it first looks.

BMSBattery sells quality items with almost zero customer support. It is great if you are sure of what you want, and know the right questions to ask. Getting a kit is usually pretty straight forward. But with those shipping prices - I've never heard of anyone returning anything.

EM3ev has very good prices and great customer service - still in China, but with Western type customer service.
Luna cycles is in the US and has great service and prices. Neither of them have these tiny motors though.

If you want this motor, alternatives are elifebike and greenbikekit. Both in China though (marginally better customer service - I think the time and language barrier gets in the way).
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:44 PM   #42
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tegnamo View Post
Amusingly, this actually makes sense, because I see on other vendor sites the same basic kit but rated at 250W.
Roughly the same motor. The difference is the motor speed.

For a 36v and the same 24v motor to have the same 200rpm, the number of windings in the motor are different.

Voltage = speed. If you change the voltage, you change the speed (unless you also change the windings in the motor)

36v and 48volt are pretty close to each other. Something that is sold as a 250rpm 36v motor and as a 330rpm 48volt motor is typically going to be exactly the same motor.
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:48 PM   #43
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Oh I know about the shipping haha. I'm looking at about $450-$550 shipping included depending on what I end up getting.

I've definitely decided on a q100 of some sort, 700c road bike with something in the realm of 36v 10ah battery. I'd like to build the hub into the wheel myself, but I'm not sure how confident I am in ordering and getting all the electronics to work together if I don't get one of the wheel kits.

Sadly...finances have gotten a bit tight lately with my wife going back to school and a 2yr old...so I may have to start socking away over the winter and have this as a spring project.
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:49 PM   #44
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tegnamo View Post
The LEED USA Electric Bike Kit | Shop E-Bike Kits Online seems competent and I just talked to their customer support. My friend bought their 250W 10aH kit and it's great I hear. But they do not carry a freehub style rear hub that accepts a more modern cassette. That is a deal killer for me. I know I could probably get away with a 7-speed freewheel but I want to have a finer selection of gears since the ebike system I'm considering isn't super powerful.
Is there a reason you don't want a front hub, and just keep your existing drivetrain intact?
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:50 PM   #45
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Roughly the same motor. The difference is the motor speed.

For a 36v and the same 24v motor to have the same 200rpm, the number of windings in the motor are different.

Voltage = speed. If you change the voltage, you change the speed (unless you also change the windings in the motor)

36v and 48volt are pretty close to each other. Something that is sold as a 250rpm 36v motor and as a 330rpm 48volt motor is typically going to be exactly the same motor.
The kit I am looking at is sold as a 350W 36V system. Is that suspicious or anything?

edit: kind of too late. just purchased this kit. will report back after the build, i hope!

Last edited by tegnamo; 10-26-16 at 02:58 PM.
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 02:59 PM   #46
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
Is there a reason you don't want a front hub, and just keep your existing drivetrain intact?
Yeah...it's just a personal preference thing in terms of keeping my front wheel as is, and I'm worried it will impact the steering too, to have an extra 4lb up front. Maybe it's unwarranted concern, of course.
tegnamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 03:11 PM   #47
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
The only real problem with a small motor on the front hub is that you need a steel fork. If not steel, sooner or later the fork will crack, and losing the front wheel leads to a very painful crash.
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 03:14 PM   #48
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
Oh I know about the shipping haha. I'm looking at about $450-$550 shipping included depending on what I end up getting.

I've definitely decided on a q100 of some sort, 700c road bike with something in the realm of 36v 10ah battery. I'd like to build the hub into the wheel myself, but I'm not sure how confident I am in ordering and getting all the electronics to work together if I don't get one of the wheel kits.

Sadly...finances have gotten a bit tight lately with my wife going back to school and a 2yr old...so I may have to start socking away over the winter and have this as a spring project.
I thought the shipping on a wheel was insane, so on my second one I bought a bare motor and built that up.
You can piece the kit together yourself if you don't want to purchase the whole wheel and motor package.
Interestingly, you can swap the core of these out, so if you get a 200rpm one and don't like it, you can get a 260rpm and replace the core without having to build a whole new wheel (and how do I know this...? LOL).
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 03:20 PM   #49
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.
Posts: 475
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 919 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
I thought the shipping on a wheel was insane, so on my second one I bought a bare motor and built that up.
You can piece the kit together yourself if you don't want to purchase the whole wheel and motor package.
Interestingly, you can swap the core of these out, so if you get a 200rpm one and don't like it, you can get a 260rpm and replace the core without having to build a whole new wheel (and how do I know this...? LOL).
Man, if I did that I would have to order both at the same time. I'm not paying big time shipping twice!

In your opinion then, a 260rpm 36vQ100H with a 36v battery would still pull with pedal assist up to 25mph+? Or am I at risk of having the motor spin out, for lack of a better term, and would do better with a 328rpm?
Abe_Froman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-16, 03:37 PM   #50
chas58
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Bikes: too many of all kinds
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Yeah, Greenbikekit shipped the second motor for free (since it fit in the box with my wheel/battery kit).

No, 260rpm is good for about 20mph on the road (peak power is about 18mph, then it falls off...

the 328rpm will do 22mph on its own, or ~25 if you can put in 200 watts. The motor power peaks at about 23mph, and then falls linearly to zero at about 30mph (its noload speed)
the 260rpm has a no load speed of 23mph. Above 23mph you are all on your own. The motor isn't helping at all.
chas58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:02 PM.