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  1. #26
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    Would a kit like this be ok: http://elifebike.com/peng/iview.asp?...-43-GR8W.234ME ?

    Hall Sensorless 201 24v - so I just get a 36 volt battery and I guess I'd need a different controller to hook it to that kit? I'm not sure how one runs a 24 volt motor at 36 volts. It doesn't burn out?

    The LiFePo4 might be overkill but I suspect the battery will be around longer than the motor. Would another type of battery be significantly lighter and provide around the same power? 30 miles is likely overkill since I do pedal a lot.

    Or this kit, which is a 300 motor already at 36 volts?
    http://elifebike.com/peng/iview.asp?...-5S-Q4BS.2MJSV
    Last edited by dgk02; 09-03-13 at 04:11 AM. Reason: Add Bafang

  2. #27
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Yep, that first kit will work. The controller will work with 24 or 36 volts (some people run them at 48 volts).

    The 24volt and 26 volt motor are basically the same (Well the internal gears are a little different, but the electronics are the same). That motor will run fine on 44 volts nominal (12s lipo) and plenty of people run it at 48v. Its really the current where people run into problems. 15amps is good, 17 is max.

    My current favorite battery (as of mid 2013) is the Samsung batteries sold at EM3ev. Its probably 60% of the size and weight of LiFePo4, but only has about 1/3 of the recharge cycles. Choose your poison (size-weight vs recycle times).

    If you only need 20+ mile range, a 36v10AH is fine. 25 miles, 12AH, 30 miles 15AH. You can extend this by pedaling of course. (I’m doing 24 miles on 10AH)


    You can either use the PAS & thumb-brakes or use the throttle, or use both. Whatever your preferred method, it is a good idea to order spares as they are very cheap, and will take a lot of time (and extra shipping $$$) to order them later. Cheap insurance to buy some spares now.

    You basically need:
    Motor
    Controller
    Throttle (if using PAS as a throttle, you need the brake levers to ensure it cuts off under braking)

  3. #28
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    So the controller and throttle limit the amps? If I don't push it too far it should be ok then. And the motor really isn't that expensive but I'd prefer not to kill it.

  4. #29
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    the controller limits the amps (although the throttle also controls the power delivery). Generally you need to fit a controller that won't burn out your motor. Roughly speaking, Amps is torque, Volts is speed. 36V is 50% faster than 24v, and 48V is 33% faster than 36v. The speed of a motor itself is determined by the number of windings of the motor (i.e. Turns), and the voltage of the battery. But most kits have that matched up pretty well so you don't have to worry about it too much. Just make sure your target top speed is about 85% of the noload speed of the motor (in other words a 200 rpm motor on a 26" wheel will do about 18mph noload, or about 15 mph on the bike with no assistance). Nothing you can do to change that for a given hub motor, unless you increase the voltage.

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