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  1. #1
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Cute Q100 stealth builds – lightweight mountain bike, lightweight road bike

    I’m building two bikes. Power is 36V10Ah:
    1) Mountain bike (slow speed) which I would like to top out with pedal assist at 20. Motor is slow wind (210) Q100. Goal: Motor optimized for 5-20mph.
    2) Road bike (higher speed) which I would like to top out with pedal assist around 26. Wheel build is in process (waiting for rim to be shipped). Motor is Fast wind (328) Q100. Goal: Motor optimized for 15-25+ mph. Note: this motor is not recommended for a 26”/700c wheel because it will not be happy below 15mph.

    Both bikes are about 23lbs with the hub motor. Battery either on a small camelback style backpack or on a rear rack. Those bottle batteries look nice, but I hear they don’t have much power (i.e. not much current capacity).

    I hope it turns out well! Stay tuned.

    Link to Kit ($320 + $180 shipping):
    http://www.greenbikekit.com/index.ph...k-battery.html

    Bike #1 - the mountain bike
    (click for larger version)
    ebike1 pst 2.jpg

    Bike #2: Fast road bike.
    Specialized Turbo for less than $1,000 total (including price of new specialized bike), but with similar specs to the $6,000 Specialized Turbo
    (click for larger version)
    specialized turbo.jpg
    Last edited by chas58; 06-28-13 at 10:15 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member coolio's Avatar
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    Looking forward to hearing about these builds as I'm looking to do the same.

  3. #3
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    I’ll post a link to the kit I got, but their website seems down. I ordered from Greenbikekit.com (GBK). They sell the same motors that BMSbattery (and that elifebike) sells, but seem to have better feedback than the BMS battery guys. They can also pack a bit more in a box before charging you extra shipping, so I got an extra motor. Hint: they can send you two front wheel builds for the shipping price of one! Unfortunately I am building two rear wheels, so I am getting the 26” wheel Chinese built, and the 700” bare motor that I will build with a nice deep V wheel. For the cost of building and shipping a second wheel, I would rather get the motor with free shipping and build the wheel here. (Shipping alone on the wheel build is $100-$150)

    Don’t expect too much customer support as these are basically just distributers/wholesalers. You are going to need a voltmeter to troubleshoot potential problems, so be prepared to get one of these if you don’t have one. You are not going to get anything useful for instructions, just a simple wiring diagram. It took me 4 days (and lots of troubleshooting) to get the bike running after the kit was installed. If you don’t have the inclination to figure this out by yourself (with help from forums), buy it from North America (assuming that is local to you).

    Don’t be fooled by the prices. Shipping is going to about double the price of anything you order, especially if you have a battery. My basic kit cost $320, but was $500 delivered. A small 36v motor is a great starter kit if you like to pedal. I was tempted to get a bottle battery, but these batteries cannot deliver more than 9-10amps. That is tiny (other battery sellers might have bottles with more than 1C capacity, but not BMS and green bike kit).

    My Kit: Cute Q100 36v 250-350 Watt motor and battery kit with 36V10Ah (LiFePO4) battery. Controller is a small 14amp, battery can put out 20amps. If I was to do it again, I might have gotten the headway batteries which at 10Ah, can actually put out 100 amps (10c). But that would only be useful with a bigger motor and controller. 20amps should be plenty with this kit.

    Kit shipped with DHL (because of the battery) and arrived about 5 days after I ordered it. That was a nice surprise!

    This should be an easy build, but never having done this before, I am coming into some problems that make me scratch my head.

    Problem #1. The rear “tai light” of the rack mounted battery pack turned on and I can’t find a way to turn it off. With some emails with GBK, I find there is a hidden (almost invisible) switch under the battery handle to turn this light on and off. Never would have found that on my own.

    Problem #2: bike is all wired up, and nothing happens. Grrr. Time to get the voltmeter out. Turns out I am getting no power from the battery, even though it has a full charge. So, I take the battery pack apart. There is a key that locks the case to the bike rack, but it turns out that the key has to be in the locked position for the battery to give power. Pretty easy answer. Wouldn’t a simple instruction manual be nice for small crap like this?

    Problem #3 turned out to be even more aggravating…
    Last edited by chas58; 05-09-13 at 11:27 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Problem #3

    Problem #3 was the most aggravating:

    Now I have power from the battery (with the key turned on), and still nothing. I have two controllers, and 4 throttles to choose from, but nothing is working I’m not sure if I am wiring something up wrong, or if something is defective (guess which? Yep it is a quality control problem, but not from me).

    I’m trying to figure out why it isn't working, if I am doing something wrong, and what is the minimum needed to get this damn thing running.

    Here is the basic answer on the minimal wiring needed to get it running:
    - Controller obviously have to be wired to the battery and to the motor.
    - Controllerc need a throttle (or something to turn them on)
    - Halls sensors - once controller needs them, the other does not. The CON61 (AKA KU65 with LED meter) is sensored, and needs the halls wires hooked up. It will not run without this wiring. The CON 62 (AKA KU63) does not required the halls sensors to run.

    I’m concentrating on the CON62 as my controller as it is simpler without the PAS, LED sensor or need for the Halls wires. So, after a couple of days of head scratching and really understanding the 3 points above, I am getting closer to the solution. It is pretty frustrating that I can’t get this bike on the road. As I understand the wiring requirements better, I am getting closer to the solution.

    The answer it takes me a couple of days to find: Looking at the red/green/black wiring on the controllers and the throttles, I notice the two throttles and the two controllers are wired differently, and one pair actually matches (the other throttle and other controller don’t match anything). Of course, the throttle and controller I am using for my testing are both wired wrong, and will not work with anything. That is the problem.

    So, after days of frustration and investigation, I finally rewire the throttle wires for both the controller (CON62) and the throttle I have put on the bike, and it runs! Yahoo! Finally!

    So, Plug and play it is not. If I had to build another bike, I could probably do it in 30 minutes, but this took me days.

  5. #5
    Senior Member coolio's Avatar
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    Glad you were able to overcome your issues . I guess you're still going with the backpack battery?

    I got a shipping quote from BMS battery for a q100 motor and the bottle battery. I think it was $300 or so for the materials. However, the big shock was almost $200 for shipping. That bites. Still mulling it over.

    My goal is to have a stealth lightweight bike that I can leave outside for short periods. No major mileage and just short jaunts on roughly flat ground.

  6. #6
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Yeah, the shipping price feels like bait and switch when you see it doubles the cost. However its like that for everyone, the wholesalers and a couple of the high quality places. Some people used to ship surface which was like $40, but sometimes it took 3 months to arrive.

    Green Bike Kit managed to stuff some extra stuff in my box for basically the same price, so I got a second kit (motor and extras) for free shipping. Had to build the wheel myself though.

  7. #7
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    While the 210 motor goes slower than I normally pedal (15 on mtb on dirt path, 20 on road bike),
    The 320rpm motor feels like a different beast. The slow motor is lazy and relaxed, like riding a 2 wheeled golf cart. The 320 motor is a speed demond. It likes to go 25mph where the slow motor likes to go 16mph. Big difference. I think for many people something in the middle would be nice, but Cute doesn't offer that. I did see a little Bafang on GreenBikeKit that was 260rpm. That might be nice for some people.

    While my initial impression is that the 320 motor fits very nice on a 700c wheel, with the important caveats:
    • Only use the motor above 15mph
    • no sustained hills
    • rider willing to help out with the pedaling to sustain 20-25mph pace



    I need to do some experimenting, but the 320 motor looks to be a nice solution for a fast rider who is willing to do some good pedaling.

    Attached thumbnail shows the 201 motor riding at 15mph, and the 320 motor (road bike) riding at 25mph
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    As much as I was dissapointed with the standard 36V 250 watt hub motor (which at 200rpm and a max of 18mph, isn't giving me much boost), the 320rpm version is just a blast to ride. With a small 14amp controller, it is a nice complement to my legs. It boosts my normal road bike speed of 20mph up to 25mph. If this is what the Specialized Turbo is like, that must be a fun bike. Of course my custom Specialized turbo is more than $6,000 cheaper and weighs 20lbs less. But the specifications are pretty similar. The one caveat is that my motor isn't a hill climber and really should not be used below 10-15mph. But as a higher speed cruising motor, it is a nice complement to a pair of legs. Its not for everyone though.

  9. #9
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    Great thread. I've been looking at GreenBikeKit wondering why things were so cheap - shipping. But still pretty cheap. My major problem is that I would like something between the 15 and 25 mph options. Mostly I go around 15 but I would like it to make it up to 20. Something only happy above 15 would not be suitable.

    I'm thinking about just plugging down $500 or so to get a kit and play with it. I have a BionX but would like something more generic. I'm not sure that I want to figure out all the crap you did, but since you did it already maybe I won't have to.

  10. #10
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    There are some options.

    Bafang makes a small motor like the Q100 that spins at 260rpm. That is going to take you up to 19mph without pedaling.

    some people run the 36v 201rpm version at 48v, increasing the speed by 30% and should also get you around 19-20mph.

    Or, you could take the 24v 201rpm version at 36v, and that would increase the speed by 50%, and get you to about 22mph without pedaling.

    Of course with any of these 4lb 250watt motors, pedaling does help.

  11. #11
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Back from my hiatus…

    Things are finally coming together nicely after all this research and work.

    The road bike is just wonderful, but the mountain bike was kind of pathetic. Given that 15mph is a casual walking pace for me, using a motor that pulls to 15mph, and has a no load speed of 18mph is just adding dead weight to my bike.

    However, that is not really a surprise though. Just doing the math shows something similar. The 201 rpm motor was originally targeted for a 12s lipo battery which is proven to do ~20mph.

    Then I had the brainstorm. Instead, why not try using the 201rpm 24v at 36 volts? That should give me a no load speed of 27mph (300rpm) and fit my needs pretty close. So instead of getting a lipo battery pack, I ordered up the 201rpm 24v hub, and just swapped out the core of the 201rpm36v wheel.

    Of course, this is what d8veh suggested many months ago in the first place. :-O

    Results: very nice. It’s just what I am looking for!

    Tested motor speeds at no load:
    210 = 18mph no load; 15mph loaded
    201 24v = 28.3 mph noload; 20mph loaded
    328 = 29.0 mph noload; 20mph loaded.

    Interestingly the 328rpm36v motor has almost identical performance characteristics to the 201rpm24v motor running with 36v.

    Both of these last two motors pull to 20mph on their own, have peak power at at 23/24mph, and are still doing 300W at 25/26mph. Since they are still pulling strong at 26mph, that gives me incentive to pedal and make up the 5mph difference.

    As for overheating, the 201rpm 36v motor (noload speed 18mph) begins to run into risk of overheating below 7.5mph, while the 328rpm 36v motor begins to run the risk of overheating below 12mph. So, a torquey hill climber this is not.

    Bottom line – since I like to pedal and have a relatively flat commute, I can cruise at 25mph. With 14amps, these motors are pretty low on torque, but they do roughly double the power output of my legs. All of that in a pair of bikes that weigh about 24lbs (not including battery). Makes for a nice pedal assist rapid commuter.

  12. #12
    Used & Abused
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    Nice projects. Glad they're working out for you. Can't wait to get my ebike going. Unfortunately a little financial set back has put that project on hold. Guess I'll have to get around the old fashioned way.

  13. #13
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Problem #4

    Problem #4

    The China wheel is really a crappy build. I noticed some spokes were loose, but because of the heavy gauge of the spokes, none of my spoke tools worked. I kept riding the bike, but unfortunately most of the spokes unthreaded making the wheel unusable. @#$%$

    A couple of hours after this happened, my LBS called and said my spoke wrench was in, so I was able to redo all of the spokes, and also dish the wheel. The original Chinese build was undished, making the tire almost touch the frame (and requiring the brakes to be realigned).

    Now the wheel is dished, centered, and properly centered in the frame.

    Obviously none of this was an issue on the wheel I had built locally.

    Moral of the story:

    Chinese parts are inexpensive, but shipping a full built wheel costs a fortune. Its just not worth it for a crappy build. For any future wheel builds, I will just order the motor, and use the $$$ saved with shipping to build the wheel locally. That way I can get any wheel I want, and support local businesses.

  14. #14
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    Chas et.al, looking for some help on deciding on my next E-bike system. This thread seems to be discussing one of my options, a Q100 36v/350 with a 48v battery, 328 to get the speed I need. My BionX is failing, and I am looking to replace it with a different system. The Q100 is on my list, but not sure if it will do what I need, but I love the stealth look of it, the lightweight, freewheeling etc. It will go on a Steintrike w/a 26" rear wheel, and I am planning on a system using the torque sensing bottom bracket and the new Cycle Analyst 3 so that it will work as a pedal assist. I'm a 135lb women, in mid 50's, in pretty decent shape. I always pedal, I ride for exercise, but, I can't ride as fast as my husband, so I use the pedal assist so we can ride together. I need to get to the mid 20's w/some assist riding a slight downgrade w/a tailwind. Windless flats I'd guess is around 15-17 mph, but there isn't anywhere we ride that is actually flat and no wind - so I'm not really certain. There is a frequent ride we do that starts w/a 3 mile hill. Average grade of 5-6%. After that, it turns to rolling hills. My concern w/the Q100 is whether it can take this hill... husband is riding a trike too, and our average speed up the hill is maybe 7-9mph. In the steepest sections we are going 4-6MPH, I think it is about 35 minutes total to the top. Occasionally we do longer climbs. A favorite is Artists Palette in Death Valley: http://www.mapmyride.com/us/pahrump-...route-63839510. I'm guessing the Q100 wouldn't handle that. Another common ride is this Uvas loop: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/226320653. I'm wondering if I could do a setup with maybe two different motor/wheels. On is my day to day "stealth" version, and then get a beefier Bafang or MAC for those more taxing climbs. Is it possible to do a setup using same battery, controller, CA, etc., and just switch out the rear wheel? Any thoughts, advice would be appreciated.. -cjr-

  15. #15
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Yeah, the Q100 is a bit small for hills.

    The 210rpm version works well at 48v (20+mph) and might be OK on hills.
    You don’t want the 3238rpm version at 24volts. That would be pretty unhappy below 30mph. Running the 328rpm version (or 201rpm24volt version at 36 volts) is going to start to have problems (heat, noise) under 10mph.

    I would just put something bigger on there if I was climbing hills, or get a slow Q100 just to use as assist with climbing.

    Yes, you can share the battery, but you can’t share controllers. The Q100 uses 14amps and can (with modification to the controller) take 17amps, but anything over that will burn out the motor. If you are doing hilly stuff, a physically bigger motor with more power will give you the torque and flexibility you need. Something like a 36v 500watt 25amp motor/controller. Of course that is more weight, and the motor is going to be a lot stronger than you are, but you can run it at slower speeds if you want to do some pedaling too. No reason why you can’t run a 500w motor at 250 watts (via the throttle), and then turn it up to 500 watts for the hills.

  16. #16
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    Thanks Chas58.. that was the conclusion I was coming to... your comments w/your experience is sort of the nail in the coffin.. so, I'll look at the beefier motors.. -cjr-

  17. #17
    Senior Member coolio's Avatar
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    Who's got the lowest shipping prices if I wanted to just order the hub and have a local wheel built up?

  18. #18
    Daily Rider Robert C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
    Given that 15mph is a casual walking pace for me. . .
    When you say something like that, it undermines your entire creditability.

    Straight from wikipedia
    Although walking speeds can vary greatly depending on factors such as height, weight, age, terrain, surface, load, culture, effort, and fitness, the average human walking speed is about 5.0 kilometres per hour (km/h), or about 3.1 miles per hour (mph). Specific studies have found pedestrian walking speeds ranging from 4.51 kilometres per hour (2.80 mph) to 4.75 kilometres per hour (2.95 mph) for older individuals and from 5.32 kilometres per hour (3.31 mph) to 5.43 kilometres per hour (3.37 mph) for younger individuals;[2][3] a brisk walking speed can be around 6.5 kilometres per hour (4.0 mph).[4] Champion racewalkers can average more than 14 kilometres per hour (8.7 mph) over a distance of 20 kilometres (12 mi).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking
    As a nation we still continue to enjoy a literally unprecedented prosperity; and it is probable that only reckless speculation and disregard of legitimate business methods on the part of the business world can materially mar this prosperity. – Theodore Roosevelt, Sixth Annual Message, December 3, 1906

  19. #19
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert C View Post
    When you say something like that {i.e. about walking**, it undermines your entire creditability.
    Robert,

    Sorry, something must have got lost in translation. Maybe the implied part is missing:

    15mph is a casual “walking pace” for me when I am on a bike. (Bold was the implied part, in a paragraph talking about bicycling).

    If I choose to jog for a workout, I’ll walk at the end to cool off. If I work out on the bike, I’ll go slow at the end to cool off. For me, that is 15mph on a bike. 15mph on a bike is my cool down, cool off, idle speed, bicycle walking pace. I mentioned that because I know it does not apply to everyone.

    My wife made an interesting comment yesterday. We were riding along at 15mph; she looked at me and said, “look at you; I’m over here huffing and puffing, and you look like you are just taking a walk through the park.” Ergo, when I’m doing 15mph on a bike, for me it is like taking a walk and for her it is a workout.

    Obviously 15mph on a bike is not a casual (i.e. walking pace) for everyone while riding a bicycle.

    Long explanation there. Back on topic in the next post.

  20. #20
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolio View Post
    Who's got the lowest shipping prices if I wanted to just order the hub and have a local wheel built up?
    coolio,

    I think it is going to be about the same anywhere, unless you are ordering multiple pieces (I got a spare hub shipped for free from greenbike kit because it fit in the box with my order, while BMSbattery would have just tacked on the extra shipping charge to my order.) BMS battery also has a minimum charge of roughly $50 for shipping while other vendors can ship small shipments for much less.

    Comparing the shipping cost of a wheel vs a hub (shippping from Asia to US) the hub ($80) + shipping ($40) was $120. Purchasing a wheel + shipping is $240.

    So in effect you are paying $120 for an offbrand wheel. If you throw a battery into your shipping box, the cost of shipping is even worse. There is nothing particularly wrong with that wheel (well, I got stranded on the side of the road because most of the spokes unloosened all at once), but consider spending that $100+ having your local bike shop build up a wheel of choice for ya.
    Last edited by chas58; 07-22-13 at 12:25 PM.

  21. #21
    Transportation Cyclist turbo1889's Avatar
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    Been a while since I checked this thread but I understood the walk pacing on a bike thing as on a bike (just like riding a horse at a walk pace rather then a gallop is how I took it). I do understand though how that implication could be lost and many people could take it as on foot, and therefore incorrect (15mph on foot is known as a 4 minute mile, AKA Olympic level runner performance level).

    I often caution people who side-walk ride their bicycles under pedestrian rules rather then riding on the road under vehicular rules to:
    Slow to pedestrian walking speed (5-mph) before entering crosswalks since motorists are not expecting a cyclist to race out into the crosswalks at many times the speed that pedestrians normally enter them and not slowing down to pedestrian walking speed before entering crosswalks is one of the most common ways sidewalk bike riders get clobbered by cars.
    By the information provided apparently my foot walking speed of about 5-mph is above average (I routinely hike 12 minute miles on a decent trail that isn't too steep). For me on flat paved roads without a head-wind I also run about 15-mph as a comfortable pedal only bike "walking pace" and my pedal only bike "gallop pace" is a little over 20-mph. So those numbers aren't that far off.

    I would disagree though that a motor set to run at only 15-mph is just useless dead weight. Depends on what one intends to use the motor for, if one wanted a motor just to maintain decent speed while climbing hills a motor that ran at that speed or even slower depending on how steep the hills in your area could be just the ticket. I've got a hill-climber only set-up that although it isn't a hub-motor but a second chain loop drive is set-up to run the motor so that its maximum power point of the motor is at a speed just a little less then 10-mph and its free spinning no load speed is a little more then 10-mph which works great to help me maintain about 10-mph speed while hill climbing through the use of the motor and the motor runs slow enough that on the flat I can go faster by pedaling alone easily enough so their is no temptation to use the motor except for when I'm climbing a hill which lets me get away with using a very small and light weight battery pack that is only good for a little over 30 minutes of power spaced out in short bursts while hill climbing.

    Long story short, if you set them up correctly motors that run at lower speeds can be useful if you want just a hill helper motor set-up and pedal only on the flat. Problem is though that most hub-motors aren't built for the low end speed, high torque application of using a motor just as a boost for hill climbing. There have been several guys over on the endless-sphere forum that have changed the winding set-up on stock hub motors to "star" winding configuration which apparently nearly doubles the torque while cutting the motor RPM's almost in half to turn these kind of small geared hub motors into hill climber helper motors but I don't have the electrical skills to change the winding set-up on motors like that which is why I just went with a second chain loop gear down set-up on my hill climber build. But apparently, if you know what your doing, you can change the motor winds in "star" configuration and that works to turn a hub-motor into a hill climber helper motor.
    Last edited by turbo1889; 07-22-13 at 03:48 PM.

  22. #22
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    Agreed, that is why I try to put my comments in context (strong rider on flat terrain). 36v motors will disappoint a lot of people unless you understand their strengths and weaknesses.

    What you describe for hillclimbing is similar to what they have done with the hilltopper motor
    http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx

    Although to lower the speed and chances of overheating, they are just using 24v power (a 36v battery would have 50% more power and speed). For many people that will give them assistance on hills, but not much on the flats. (my 24v motor at 24volts is good for about 10mph).


    Quote Originally Posted by turbo1889 View Post
    ... I would disagree though that a motor set to run at only 15-mph is just useless dead weight. Depends on what one intends to use the motor for, if one wanted a motor just to maintain decent speed while climbing hills a motor that ran at that speed or even slower depending on how steep the hills in your area could be just the ticket. I've got a hill-climber only set-up that although it isn't a hub-motor but a second chain loop drive is set-up to run the motor so that its maximum power point of the motor is at a speed just a little less then 10-mph and its free spinning no load speed is a little more then 10-mph which works great to help me maintain about 10-mph speed while hill climbing through the use of the motor and the motor runs slow enough that on the flat I can go faster by pedaling alone easily enough so their is no temptation to use the motor except for when I'm climbing a hill which lets me get away with using a very small and light weight battery pack that is only good for a little over 30 minutes of power spaced out in short bursts while hill climbing.

    Long story short, if you set them up correctly motors that run at lower speeds can be useful if you want just a hill helper motor set-up and pedal only on the flat. Problem is though that most hub-motors aren't built for the low end speed, high torque application of using a motor just as a boost for hill climbing. There have been several guys over on the endless-sphere forum that have changed the winding set-up on stock hub motors to "star" winding configuration which apparently nearly doubles the torque while cutting the motor RPM's almost in half to turn these kind of small geared hub motors into hill climber helper motors but I don't have the electrical skills to change the winding set-up on motors like that which is why I just went with a second chain loop gear down set-up on my hill climber build. But apparently, if you know what your doing, you can change the motor winds in "star" configuration and that works to turn a hub-motor into a hill climber helper motor.

  23. #23
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    It is interesting to compare these two bikes and these two motors. The clear winner for me (a strong rider in flat terrain) is the 24v201rpm Q100 build running at 36V 300rpm.

    The 36V328rpm motor is good on a road bike, but it does growl at low speeds. It does seem to have more torque and more “kick” when it engages at moderate speeds. On a fast road bike it makes a fun combination.
    The 24v201rpm motor at 300rpm is a lot smoother and quieter. It seems much more flexible and useable, even if it doesn’t seem to have the kick of the 36v328 motor.

    My goal with E-assist was to have 50% power input from me, 50% power input from the motor, and an increase of 5mph top speed of both bikes. That is pretty much what I have ended up with:

    Average Cruising speed in MPH:
    MTB-P 17.5 (pedal only)
    Road-P 20.5 (pedal only)
    MTB-e 23 (Max ~25) (e-assist)
    Road-P 25 (Max ~28) (e-assist)

    The other little surprise is range. For my average commute, the MTB at 23mph has a range of about 24 miles. The road bike at 25mph has a range of 32 miles. The road bike has 33% longer range than the mountain bike. Both bikes are fairly stiff and fast bikes that weigh about 24lbs without battery. Obviously the road bike is a lot more efficient in pedal only or e-assist mode.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
    It is interesting to compare these two bikes and these two motors. The clear winner for me (a strong rider in flat terrain) is the 24v201rpm Q100 build running at 36V 300rpm.
    Ok, so I think a 24v running at 36 works for my little project which is a mountain bike frame that will give me some assist up to 20mph or so. It will usually get recharged after 12 miles and I can pedal more if not. I would like a front drive but I guess that isn't really a major concern. I'm a bit concerned about the rear wheel being more complicated and being stuck with a freewheel instead of a cassette.

    I would like a local wheel build (at least if rear wheel) so is there a kit that will have all the parts needed but just the motor and not the whole wheel? Or a list of parts that I can order that would include the necessary controller and throttle? I'll take any throttle at the start and can always substitute another if I don't like how it works. Thanks for this thread.

    Oh, and maybe this battery? http://www.pingbattery.com/servlet/t...lithium/Detail

  25. #25
    Senior Member chas58's Avatar
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    I think the small Q100 would be fine in a front wheel as long as you have a steel fork. There is a Q140 (I think) that is similar to a Q100, but accepts cassettes instead of a 7 speed freewheel. I rather like the rear installation because the rear is a stronger place to mount the motor and you don't have to worry about the front wheel washing out under power. but with a light small electric motor, its not a big difference either way, and a motor on the front wheel can help balance out the bike and does allow you to keep your original gearing.

    For the kit, look at greenbikekit, elifebike, bmsbattery and see what is in their kit. That will give you a packing list of what you need to order. The motor is about $79 (plus lots of shipping). Throttles are about $5, so you can get one of each (thumb and twist).

    That battery would be fine. It will probably give you a 30 mile range. Do you need that much? LiFePo4 is great because it can be recharged thousands of times, but I find them a little heavy.

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