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  1. #1
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    Adapting a Bicycle light for use in heavy fog.

    I posted the following over in Touring Tips but though that pehaps people here would find it interesting too.

    Converting a Bicycle light for use in heavy fog.

    This winter has given our area a lot of heavy fog some nights when I'm riding in the country. My CygoLite Rover II has a maxinum of 250 lumens output and has a low, high, super-high and a flashing (NOT strobe) modes. However even on the low setting the light beams do not pentrate far into the fog but bounce back. I had some clear ambe acrylic here that I bought years ago at a Goodwill store. I think that amber acrylic was originally a car visor.

    I cut a piece off of the acrylic. Then I radiused the four corners. Next i cut 2 notches on each side of the cut off amber acrylic. Two rubber bands are used to hold the amber acrylic over the lens.

    Here are 2 images that show the light on high beam without and with the amber acrylic in place.


    Without:

    IMG_3553 by Miele Man, on Flickr

    With:

    IMG_3554 by Miele Man, on Flickr
    IMG_3554 by Miele Man, on Flickr

    There's only one problem. Since I decided to do this there's been no more fog!

    BTW, if your light is round you might be able to simply fit a trailer light amber lens cover over it.

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    I wonder if it might be worthwhile to try mounting a set lower on the front forks, say down around the axle. I know cars with fog lamps generally have them mounted lower and much closer to the pavement than head lights. Just thinking out loud.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    I wonder if it might be worthwhile to try mounting a set lower on the front forks, say down around the axle. I know cars with fog lamps generally have them mounted lower and much closer to the pavement than head lights. Just thinking out loud.
    It'd be hard to mount my Cygolite Rover II on the fork let alone down low on a fork. The Rover II has Crossfire (trademark) and is two lenses in one housing and each light beam crosses the other one. in fog you can clearly see that crossover. Another thing with mounting that light on the fork is that I'd no longer be able to reach tthe top of the light to change tthe setting.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Ground fog here is so thick I won't ride it with any lights.
    My Concern is Being seen from Behind.
    Last edited by 10 Wheels; 01-15-16 at 05:41 PM.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
    Ground fog here is so thick I won't ride it with any lights.
    Sometimes the fog rolls in/forms when you're out riding. With a bit of luck it might be thin enough that you can see into it with an amber light. This amber cover of mine will live in the seatbag of my bike in case I need it. however, I'm lucky that in my area the fog gets thick but not absolutely inpenetrable like it can be on the coast.

    Cheers

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
    It'd be hard to mount my Cygolite Rover II on the fork let alone down low on a fork. The Rover II has Crossfire (trademark) and is two lenses in one housing and each light beam crosses the other one. in fog you can clearly see that crossover. Another thing with mounting that light on the fork is that I'd no longer be able to reach tthe top of the light to change tthe setting.

    Cheers
    My apologies. I wasn't aware keeping the current lights was a requirement, though I can see it would be preferable.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
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    Most all bike lights have round beams which shine light upward. This illuminates the fog in front of you making it harder to see. A light with a sharp cutoff will work much better in the fog. It's like the difference between car high and low beams in the fog.
    Eschew simplistic dogma.

  8. #8
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    My hint about using the amber acrylic to cut fog was intended as an inexpensive fix/modification that could be easily attached or removed to/from a light. it was intended for those who encounter fog but don't want to have to replace what could be an expensive light they already own.

    Cheers

  9. #9
    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
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    It might be fun to ride in the fog. Like whiteout when skiing, until you hit a tree.

    Sonny Bono dies:

    Sonny Bono Dies in Ski Accident - latimes

  10. #10
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    A round beam definitely is at a disadvantage compared to aimed optics like cars use in the fog. The only thing you can do is aim the beam pattern so that it's circle is on the ground and not into the fog. There a very few lights slowly coming into the market now that do use aimed optics, my Philips Saferide is one such light, which is no surprise that Philips would do that since they make motorcycle and car headlights.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF4MIEkIBZs

  11. #11
    Daily Rider Robert C's Avatar
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    Fog is one of the reasons I modified my light. It is mounted lower than a normal bike light, as you can see, it is just on top of the fender. I also added a defusing lens, this reduces the conical light pattern that s common to bike lights.
    IMG_1335.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    As a nation we still continue to enjoy a literally unprecedented prosperity; and it is probable that only reckless speculation and disregard of legitimate business methods on the part of the business world can materially mar this prosperity. Theodore Roosevelt, Sixth Annual Message, December 3, 1906

  12. #12
    Senior Member no motor?'s Avatar
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    The diffusing lens on my my Magicshine worked great when we had heavy fog last year.

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