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  1. #1
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    Cadence meter -- need large digits

    I'm looking for a cadence meter that reads cadence in the large digits where speed is usually displayed, instead of in smaller digits up or down in a corner or separate info bar. Ideally I'd like a computer that I can switch from reading speed in the big digits to reading cadence. I know I can jerry-rig a cadence meter with a cheap cmputer, but is there a ready made option out there for me?

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    Ari Gabinet

  2. #2
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
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    You are going to need one magnet and sensor for measuring cadence from your crankset and another magnet and sensor for reading speed from your wheel. You will also need some sort of slide switch that disconnects the wires from one sensor and connects the wires from the other sensor to the display unit. Jerry rigging such a cyclometer would not be too hard. Good luck on finding a commercial version.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member dunningrb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agabinet View Post
    I'm looking for a cadence meter that reads cadence in the large digits where speed is usually displayed, instead of in smaller digits up or down in a corner or separate info bar. Ideally I'd like a computer that I can switch from reading speed in the big digits to reading cadence. I know I can jerry-rig a cadence meter with a cheap cmputer, but is there a ready made option out there for me?

    Vision going in PA

    Ari Gabinet
    Ari, the CatEye Astrale 8 does exactly what you want. I think CatEye is replacing the Astrale 8 with the Strada, which does *not* do this. Unfortunately, the Astrale 8 has become difficult to find. There are a few for sale on Ebay.

  4. #4
    pedalphile
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    Just out of curiosity, why does one need a cadenceometer? (Is that a word?)

    I would think you have a pretty good idea how fast you are spinning, or is serious training improved by close tracking of one's cadence?

  5. #5
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    The Cateye Astrale 8 does this, as the previous poster said, and the Garmin Forerunner 305 will do this as well, but that might be more than you're willing to spend. There are plenty of places selling the Astrale 8 for around $40. I used one for about 4 years before the wiring harness died (was installed without any slack in the wires, they eventually shorted).

    Pete, seeing your cadence is objective; rather than just thinking you're spinning fast, you can see that you've maintained 102rpm for the last few miles. I'd rather know my cadence than my speed.

  6. #6
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekker pete View Post
    Just out of curiosity, why does one need a cadenceometer? (Is that a word?)

    I would think you have a pretty good idea how fast you are spinning, or is serious training improved by close tracking of one's cadence?
    If you know your cadence continuously in real time, you can use it to guide your shifting. You will find yourself shifting down earlier and more often. When your cadence falls below a certain number you shift. When you shift down your cadence suddenly jumps up 10 - 15 rpms. The end result will be that you will actually turn in a faster time for the same course. You can also determine what cadence is most sustainable for you over a period of hours, not just a momentary spurt. You can also work at increasing your cadence a very few rpm. at a time. In the end you will reap the benefits of a consistently faster cadence. I also thought I did not need to know until I got my hands on a cadence meter. Now two of my three bikes have one. I may soon have one on the third bike, too.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekker pete View Post
    ... a cadenceometer? (Is that a word?)
    Could use "tachometer" if you prefer ...

  8. #8
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    A very simple and cheap way to do this is purchase a $10 cycle computer in Wal-mart and set it up to read cadence instead of speed. Here is how to do it.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Very...-Your-Bike-12/

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekker pete View Post
    Just out of curiosity, why does one need a cadenceometer? (Is that a word?)

    I would think you have a pretty good idea how fast you are spinning, or is serious training improved by close tracking of one's cadence?
    It's actually for my wife, who is in her second real season of riding and now understands that cadence is important. She wants to be able to work on cadence but can't see the little numbers on her Cat Eye. So, it's either the $12 mph to rpm conversion, or the Astrale. I've been riding long enough to know my cadence within a few rpm usually. I'm a real spinner, I like to stay in the high 90's.

    Thanks to all for guidance.

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