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Thread: Self-discharge

  1. #1
    Senior Member degnaw's Avatar
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    Self-discharge

    I was trying to choose between regular NiMH batteries and Sanyo eneloops; do regular NiMHs, discharged to about 60% power during my commutes and recharged for the next day, self discharge as fast as they would if they are stored the entire time? I read alot about eneloops being good for low power consumption or extended-time storage, but are they worth the extra cost if I use them everyday?

  2. #2
    The Fenix Shillboy varuscelli's Avatar
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    Personally, in your usage situation as described, I'd probably consider using higher-capacity NiMHs as opposed to Eneloops.

    Even though you probably won't be pushing the limits of their capacity (since you only typically discharge them to about 60%), you'll get longer run time if you ever want or need it and the higher capacity batteries will leave you in with less chance of ever fully discharging them via your use. Since the Eneloops are relatively to the lower capacity side (by today's standards), you might push them more than you would a 2500-2700 mAh battery.

    Another consideration might be as Wanderer pointed out in the "Battery charger -- what fits my needs?" thread where he cited the Eneloops as better cold-weather performers than hot-weather performers. Those considerations might be worth a look, too, as part of your evaluation.

    Personally, I use mostly the higher-capacity NiMH batteries, but I also keep some Eneloops in reserve.

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    I always seem to get burned whenever higher capacity NiMHs come out - I've been buying them since AAs were 1200mAh, and it seems to me that the highest capacity cells at a given time die and go bad prematurely on me. The personal exceptions have been Sanyos - pre-Eneloop, and now Eneloops. I wonder if the reduced capacity is related to the LSD and better reliability. YMMV.
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    Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk znomit's Avatar
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    Given 2500mAh normals versus 2000mAh eneloops the break even point is around 2-3 weeks.
    Eneloops for remotes, blinkies etc where you want them to last 3+ months.

  5. #5
    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
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    If you have to recharge daily anyway, I'd suggest you take the higher capacity normal NiMH. Unless you have specific cold weather use where the Eneloops might fare better, as mentioned. Maybe get a pair of Eneloops for reserve.

    I had some initial problems with a Fenix L2D light and my oldish NiMH batteries. I now have a couple of "hybrid" NiMHs (GP Battery's version of Eneloops) in reserve. They don't need to be freshly charged to help me home in the event of my primary NiMHs failing.

    --J
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    Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


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