Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets HRM, GPS, MP3, HID. Whether it's got an acronym or not, here's where you'll find discussions on all sorts of tools, toys and gadgets.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-16-08, 08:57 PM   #1
Binski99`
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Schwinn Bike Computer HELP!!!!

So I bought one of those 12 function bike computers made by schwinn. My tires are 26x2.3. So what should my wheel factor be. It says to multiply the wheel diameter in milimeters by 3.1416. I gave the chart below but I want it as accurate as possible.

Thanks in advance!!!



Schwinn Bike Computer Wheel Size numbers
Wheel Diameter Number
20" 1596
22" 1759
24" 1916
26" (650A) 2073
26.5" (Tubular) 2117
26.6" (700x25C) 2124
26.8" (700x28C) 2136
27" (700x32C) 2155
28" (700B) 2237

w/ tire
ATB 24X1.75 1888
ATB 26x1.4 1995
ATB 26x1.5 2030
ATB 26x1.75 2045
ATB 26x2 (650B) 2099
27x1 2136
27x1 1/4 2155

Last edited by Binski99`; 09-17-08 at 06:01 PM.
Binski99` is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-08, 09:14 PM   #2
Big_e
Strong with the Fred
 
Big_e's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Dallas, TX
Bikes:
Posts: 970
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a newer schwinn computer and an older one that lists a size of Wheel diameter w/tire: 26x2 (650B)- Wheel factor: 2099. That looks to be the closest, hope that helps.
Ernest

PS: Wonder if your list is a misprint since it says that factor for a 23x2 is 2099 which wouldn't really make sense. Now that I read both of my lists closely, they both say the same thing with the 26x2 wheel. Yours must be a misprint. 26x2 is the closest to your wheel with tire size.

Last edited by Big_e; 09-16-08 at 09:22 PM.
Big_e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-08, 09:22 PM   #3
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
but I want it as accurate as possible.
If you want it as accurate as possible, then inflate your front tire to your normal riding pressure, sit on the bike, and measure how far it rolls in one wheel rotation while you're sitting on it.

The usual method is to make a mark on the tire, align the mark to a starting mark on the floor, then roll forward until the mark on the tire is pointing at the floor again, jump off, and mark the floor with your ending point. Now measure the distance between the starting and ending marks.
mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-08, 09:27 PM   #4
bottlecape30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
that is so weird i bought the same unit the other day.
the thing i can't figure out is where on the spoke to put the magnet?
in my mind where this is placed should make a big difference.
bottlecape30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-08, 11:56 PM   #5
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlecape30 View Post
that is so weird i bought the same unit the other day.
the thing i can't figure out is where on the spoke to put the magnet?
in my mind where this is placed should make a big difference.
It doesn't matter where you put the magnet on the spoke. The magnet will still trigger the sensor at the same frequency when the wheel's turning, no matter where on the spoke you've placed the magnet. So don't sweat it
mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 01:41 PM   #6
Binski99`
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I measured one full rotation and that was a distance of 2100 mm so that is what I set it as. Oh yeah that was a typo I made it is 26x2

Thanks for all the help
Binski99` is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 07:30 PM   #7
Big_e
Strong with the Fred
 
Big_e's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Dallas, TX
Bikes:
Posts: 970
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
It doesn't matter where you put the magnet on the spoke. The magnet will still trigger the sensor at the same frequency when the wheel's turning, no matter where on the spoke you've placed the magnet. So don't sweat it
With all due respect, are you sure about that? I would think that different placements could give false readings on the speed. I placed mine right above the spot where the spokes cross as they near the axle. That's kinda how the small illustration has it placed.
Ernest
Big_e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 07:51 PM   #8
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_e View Post
With all due respect, are you sure about that? I would think that different placements could give false readings on the speed. I placed mine right above the spot where the spokes cross as they near the axle. That's kinda how the small illustration has it placed.
Ernest

Absolutely certain, yeah It's a question I have to answer a lot (LBS mechanic since 1989).

If the computer were trying to detect the linear velocity at which the magnet is travelling, then it would matter, because the further out the magnet is located, the faster its linear velocity. But that's not how the computer computes speed. It looks at the frequency of sensor impulses, which is independent of the magnet's location on the spoke. For a given ground speed, any point on the spoke will pass by the sensor at the same frequency.

And that's a good thing, or else it would be very difficult to set up bike computers accurately!

On a separate note, I like to put the magnet at the crossing point of the spokes too, for wired computers (for wireless, I put the sensor as close to the bars as possible). Many spoke magnets can engage two spokes at the crossing point, keeping the magnet from getting bumped out of position as time goes by.

Last edited by mechBgon; 09-17-08 at 07:55 PM.
mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 08:49 PM   #9
bicycleflyer
747 Freight Pilot
 
bicycleflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ohio, USA
Bikes: Rivendell, Bike-Friday Pocket-Rocket and one home made fixed gear
Posts: 458
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
All you are doing is multiplying diameter by 3.14 (aka "Pie") to get circumference. Basic math. Some computers want centimeters, some want millimeters, others want some goofy formula. Your's just wants millimeters which is not uncommon. A roll out test will give you the most accurate results.

But for future reference, Sheldon Brown has a master-chart of most all wheel sizes.

http://sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer-calibration.html

In your case...use column "F"

Don't get too anal about this. Even if you only use the chart instead of a roll out, you still have better accuracy than the speedometer/odometer on most autos. FWIW .... I just use charts myself.
bicycleflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 09:49 PM   #10
bottlecape30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
Absolutely certain, yeah It's a question I have to answer a lot (LBS mechanic since 1989).

If the computer were trying to detect the linear velocity at which the magnet is travelling, then it would matter, because the further out the magnet is located, the faster its linear velocity. But that's not how the computer computes speed. It looks at the frequency of sensor impulses, which is independent of the magnet's location on the spoke. For a given ground speed, any point on the spoke will pass by the sensor at the same frequency.

And that's a good thing, or else it would be very difficult to set up bike computers accurately!

On a separate note, I like to put the magnet at the crossing point of the spokes too, for wired computers (for wireless, I put the sensor as close to the bars as possible). Many spoke magnets can engage two spokes at the crossing point, keeping the magnet from getting bumped out of position as time goes by.

Hey thanks,
that makes sence. I remember hooking one of these up to my brothers bike years ago and they had you messure a point on the spoke. Good to know that is no longer nessary.
Cheers
bottlecape30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-08, 08:17 AM   #11
dalesd
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
It doesn't matter where you put the magnet on the spoke. The magnet will still trigger the sensor at the same frequency when the wheel's turning, no matter where on the spoke you've placed the magnet. So don't sweat it
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
With one-magnet cyclecomputers, you usually have a choice of several places on the wheel to attach the spoke magnet, depending on the spoke pattern of the wheel. Generally, it is best to mount the magnet as close in toward the hub as possible. The closer in you mount it, the more slowly it will pass by the sensor, giving the sensor's magnetic switch more time to respond. If the magnet is too far out, the computer may give erratic readings at higher speeds.
http://sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer-installation.html
[emphasis added]
dalesd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-08, 09:10 AM   #12
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalesd View Post
On my commuting mountain bike, I have the sensor located halfway up the fork blade, and it has no problem reading speeds approaching 60mph. Having installed thousands of computers in my career, I'd probably know by now if this were actually an issue Put the magnet where you prefer (unless it's a wireless sensor, in which case I suggest placing it as close to the handlebars as practical, for obvious reasons).


Last edited by mechBgon; 09-18-08 at 09:29 AM.
mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-10, 05:57 PM   #13
robert1234
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlecape30 View Post
that is so weird i bought the same unit the other day.
the thing i can't figure out is where on the spoke to put the magnet?
in my mind where this is placed should make a big difference.
All the thing does is count the times the wheel goes around so it doesn't matter at all where the magnet is located.
robert1234 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-10, 06:27 PM   #14
bktourer1
Senior Member
 
bktourer1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western Ma.
Bikes: Diamondback "parkway" Spec. "expedition
Posts: 786
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To make sure I had the right #'s in the computer, I found a road marker that started in 0 and rode till I hit 1 mile.
I was a fraction off, not enough to make a difference
bktourer1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:49 AM.