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Old 03-10-09, 03:49 PM   #1
ebrady
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Cateye Strada Cadence Sensor Mounting

Has anyone ever mounted the wheel sensor for a wired Cateye Strada Cadence computer on the front fork instead of the rear? This should be easy, it requires separating the cadence/speed sensor wires so they can be mounted further apart. I would like to know if anyone has done this.

Why? I noticed that readings taken off my front wheel are more accurate. I believe this is because less weight sits over the front wheel then the rear. This makes it less prone to circumference fluctuations based upon weight, gear, tire pressure, and weather conditions.
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Old 03-10-09, 04:02 PM   #2
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Why? I noticed that readings taken off my front wheel are more accurate. I believe this is because less weight sits over the front wheel then the rear. This makes it less prone to circumference fluctuations based upon weight, gear, tire pressure, and weather conditions.
The biggest fluctuation will be the effective radius of the wheels when you lean the bike over.

As you lean the contact area of the tyre moves and the wheel effectively gets smaller.

For accuracy I recommend that you do all your cycling in a straight line.

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Old 03-10-09, 04:53 PM   #3
ebrady
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The biggest fluctuation will be the effective radius of the wheels when you lean the bike over.

Not to get on a tangent to my original question, I would tend to think when you lean you reduce the contact size of both wheels together. So, even though leaning effects the accuracy, the rear wheel, having more weight distributed over will still exhibit a higher degree of circumference change. This would still result in a higher degree of inaccuracy on the rear.
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Old 03-10-09, 05:06 PM   #4
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So, even though leaning effects the accuracy, the rear wheel, having more weight distributed over will still exhibit a higher degree of circumference change. This would still result in a higher degree of inaccuracy on the rear.
For the best road holding ideally you want similar amounts of tyre deformation front and back.

I trust you are measuring this when setting your tyre pressures ?
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