Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    The White Mountains of AZ
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Shimano dynohub water entry - Plug position important?

    I've done some googling for advice on orienting the plug on my new Shimano DH-3D72 dynohub without any luck.

    For a clean install and short wire loop I would like to orient the plug pointing up but I wonder if I'll run into problems with gravity leading water into the plug.

    Is this something I need to worry about?

  2. #2
    Randomhead
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like to point mine back and down because I like to have some slack for when I'm taking off my wheel. However, as far as I can tell there is no way to get water intrusion from the hub half of the connector

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    northern Deep South
    My Bikes
    Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
    Posts
    1,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I usually point mine up, on the theory that it disconnects when I take the wheel off. After changing a flat, I usually don't care which direction it ends up in. But honestly, I haven't had problems with it in any orientation (so far!).

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    3,946
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
    I usually point mine up, on the theory that it disconnects when I take the wheel off. After changing a flat, I usually don't care which direction it ends up in. But honestly, I haven't had problems with it in any orientation (so far!).
    Yeah, ditto. The plug is an electrical connection - I'm not sure there's any way to get water into the hub via it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    The White Mountains of AZ
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the input. I oriented the plug the way I wanted to (up) but couldn't resist packing the connector with dielectric grease.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Aushiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia
    My Bikes
    LoGo P-38, Bacchetta Giro ATT 20, Look 555, Giant XTC 2, Surly Long Haul Trucker
    Posts
    971
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have mine pointing up simply for convenience. I do the same with my SON hub as well. Neither have caused me any problems so far.

    Andrew

  7. #7
    Senior Member Rob_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    My Bikes
    Surly Longhaul Trucker, Dahon Boardwalk, Raleigh 20
    Posts
    1,496
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bug Shield View Post
    Thanks for the input. I oriented the plug the way I wanted to (up) but couldn't resist packing the connector with dielectric grease.
    Does that conduct electricity? I'd be worried about putting anything in hat might short the connection.

  8. #8
    Randomhead
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    dielectric grease is commonly used to keep electrical contacts from corroding. This is a perfect application

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    3,946
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    dielectric grease is commonly used to keep electrical contacts from corroding. This is a perfect application
    I don't really know if this matters for a dynamo, but I found this amusing. From wikipedia -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease


    Dielectric Grease

    Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.

    A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces has the advantage of sealing the contact area against corrosion.

    Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector because it could interfere with the electrical signals passing through the connector in cases where the contact pressure is very low. Products designed as electronic connector lubricants, on the other hand, should be applied to such connector contacts and can dramatically extend their useful life. Polyphenyl Ether, rather than silicone grease, is the active ingredient in some such connector lubricants.

    Silicone grease should not be applied to (or next to) any switch contact that might experience arcing, as silicone can convert to silicon-carbide under arcing conditions, and accumulation of the silicon-carbide can cause the contacts to prematurely fail. (British Telecom had this problem in the 1970s when silicone SymelŪ sleeving was used in telephone exchanges. Vapour from the sleeving migrated to relay contacts and the resultant silicon-carbide caused intermittent connection.)

  10. #10
    Randomhead
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have seen dielectric grease used in a lot of applications other than car ignition. The contacts on my oldest dyno are fairly corroded, a little dielectric grease wouldn't have hurt

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •