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  1. #26
    Senior Member overbyte's Avatar
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    Another way to mount a camera for a better point of view.

    I've ordered a Mobius action camera to mount on my bike, so I've been watching a lot of videos about the different ways to mount cameras. The one I like the best is a pole mount behind the rider, known as a 3rd person POV (point of view). Here's a search showing several of these and one about how a guy (Colin M.) made his mount.
    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...on+bike+camera
    Here's the bracket that Colin M used: http://www.x8drums.com/Gibraltar-Pea...-p/sc-pugc.htm
    SC-PUGC-2T.jpg

    Here he explains how he used the bracket:


    You don't necessarily have to buy a carbon-fiber pole like he did. An aluminum tube or even a wooden push-broom replacement handle would work. I'm going to try it out with 3/4" PVC conduit that has a flared end for the fitting of the next piece without any separate coupling. I found a seatpost clamp that exactly fits around the stretched end. I'll make a slit in the outer tube (terminated with a round hole for stress relief) so the extra seatpost clamp can compress the outer tube around the inner one to hold securely. That way, I'll have a 2-piece pole that can be taken apart quickly and stored in a pannier or backpack or on the rear rack when not in use. PVC may be too flexible and therefore bouncy. I'll see. Also, he mentions using a piece of rubber or cloth to keep the clamp from scratching the seatpost. In other projects, I found that black friction tape is the best because it is slightly sticky, made of rubber impregnated cloth that doesn't ooze or stretch like vinyl electrical tape. Hardware stores sell it. It's not vinyl electrical tape, but something different. The friction tape keeps the clamp from slipping around the seatpost.

    This POV lets you see the rider and his immediate surroundings as well as the scenery.
    Watch a little of this example:

    I like that the video shows what the rider is doing, so you get a sense of the effort and that it's really a bike ride video, not a motorcycle or car or whatever. The main annoyance with it though is that the bike rocks side to side when you're pedaling hard or standing, and this causes the horizon to rock. You don't notice this rocking horizon when you're the rider on the bike because your head tilts and actually your eyeballs can rotate to maintain a horizontal horizon. I'm working on a swiveling bracket for a pole mount so the camera can remain more upright in spite of the rocking. If I figure one out, I'll post a sample video and a how-to instruction.

    Compare that video with this one taken from a handlebar position:


    And here are more points of view:


    There are other YouTube videos that demonstrate comparisons of the various mounting positions: helmet, handlebar, chest, bike frame, telescoping pole on handlebar mount, 3rd person backpack, and 3rd person pole. The handlebar has a lot of vibration and side-to-side (left-right turning) motion at times, and you often don't see any of the bike in the picture. The helmet suffers from showing where you're looking rather than where you're going. Chest mount has problem that its view is affected by your riding position which changes from time to time during a ride (leaned way forward, more upright, depending on hand position) and the picture is framed by two big arms. Bike frame mount is not too bad, but has more vibration than chest mount.
    Last edited by overbyte; 05-07-14 at 03:56 PM.

  2. #27
    Senior Member overbyte's Avatar
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    I called a local musical instrument store and asked. They had the drum bracket in stock, and they would match the online price, so I rode down there and got it. It weighs 1 lb 3.0 oz (540 grams) out of the package. Very sturdy and rigid. I hope to have a test video using one of my ordinary cameras tomorrow and then with the action camera when it arrives.

  3. #28
    Senior Member overbyte's Avatar
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    My Mobius camera arrived yesterday, so today I mounted it on my touring bike with a handlebar mount (designed by Arkon Resources, Inc., Arcadia, California; made in China; model CMP227) and took a test video. Here's the mount:
    $T2eC16RHJHUFFisSw87qBSHPNwUK2w~~60_12.JPG

    It seems more appropriate for me to post my experiences with the Mobius on its own thread, so I will post a test video there after I've uploaded it to YouTube. All I'm showing here is a still photo I took of the produce department at a supermarket with the camera handheld after I parked my bike and went shopping. This is the wide-angle version of Mobius (lens B), which has roughly 116 degree horizontal field of view. I notice now that the camera date-time clock needs to be set to current value, which I'll do with the settings utility program.
    IMAG0006.jpg
    (Click photo to enlarge.)
    Last edited by overbyte; 05-10-14 at 11:50 PM.

  4. #29
    Senior Member overbyte's Avatar
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    I said (above):
    You don't necessarily have to buy a carbon-fiber pole like he did. An aluminum tube or even a wooden push-broom replacement handle would work. I'm going to try it out with 3/4" PVC conduit that has a flared end for the fitting of the next piece without any separate coupling. I found a seatpost clamp that exactly fits around the stretched end. I'll make a slit in the outer tube (terminated with a round hole for stress relief) so the extra seatpost clamp can compress the outer tube around the inner one to hold securely. That way, I'll have a 2-piece pole that can be taken apart quickly and stored in a pannier or backpack or on the rear rack when not in use. PVC may be too flexible and therefore bouncy. I'll see.
    I tried the 3/4" PVC. Indeed, it is too flexible. The end bounces like a spring for a long time when I pluck it. I looked up the Young's modulus of various materials: Modulus of Elasticity - Young Modulus for some common Materials PVC is too flexible because of a very low modulus, around 2 to 4. Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, which is what Colin M used, is stiffer, with a modulus of 150. Aluminum has modulus 69; steel 200; stainless steel 180. For the same cross-section and length, a pole made of higher Young's modulus material is stiffer than lower modulus material.

    I found a closet pole at a hardware store today, made of thin stainless steel, telescoping from 30" to 48" length, approximately 1" diameter. It is called the Lido ExtendoLock Multi-Use Rod, made by Lido Designs of Valencia, California (manufactured in China), UPC 028705003218. At the top end, I clamped on a T-bar handlebar extension called "FIRSTCLASS" from China (find it on eBay):

    It is 2 pieces, and the T-bar top piece can mount onto the vertical clamp-tube at 90 degrees from the way it's illustrated here, which is what I did so that the top of the T is horizontal. To be sure the T won't come out of the tube, I drilled a small hole and inserted a screw to bind them together. Then I moved the handlebar camera mount to the T-bar. This lets me tilt the camera up and down for alignment with the view I want, just like on a handlebar. I used a seatpost clamp, that I had purchased for a different project, to tighten the grip at the sliding joint where the outer and inner metal tubes are held by a shim coupling. There is a gripping device inside the pole which tightens the hidden end of the inner pole to lock it in position after you've slid it to the desired length. The gripper tightens when you twist the poles, loosens when you twist the other direction. (Mine has gotten stuck at the full extension position where I locked it, apparently because the locking device has too much friction of the inner screw thread, so once I muscle it loose with some pliers, I'll take it apart and grease the screw threads to prevent this.) I added some black friction tape to the outer and inner tubes to give me better grip for doing the locking/unlocking twist.

    I've posted some photos of the whole assembly in my new thread on 3rd person POV with the Mobius camera. (See link below.)

    Another thing you can do with this pole mount is remove it from the drum clamp and carry it with you to take off-bike videos of your biking adventure. This is similar to the way that hikers use the Stickpic on a trekking pole to take walk-along videos of themselves on their hikes. See this article and embedded video for explanation: http://www.backpacker.com/gear-revie...ory/gear/14322

    I'm going to make some test videos with this 3rd person POV setup for comparison with the handlebar mounting position and post on YouTube and reference them in my Mobius thread: (3rd Person Point of View Videos with Mobius Action Camera).
    Last edited by overbyte; 05-11-14 at 09:33 AM.

  5. #30
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
    .......On a related note, I've thought the video would be more interesting if the camera was lower, perhaps mounted on the head tube with some sort of strap on bracket. Has anyone seen such a thing, or would I have to make it myself?

    BB
    The JVC cam has a similar shape to the ContourGPS I'm using.
    I don't use any specific mounts; just strips from an old inner tube.
    I notice the footage is more stable when not mounted on the bars.
    I've mounted my cam by the rear triangle, fork, seat post, etc. In
    this clip it's mounted on the top tube near the head tube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AopS...6zPoymgKaIoDLA

  6. #31
    Velocommuter Commando Sirrus Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
    My son gave me a JVC Adixxion camera (GoPro clone), and I've enjoyed using it, but the JVC handlebar mount has enough play in it that it actually amplifies road vibration, making video worthless if the road is rough enough (see attached clip). Unlike the GoPro, it uses a standard camera screw on mount, so that should open up lots of possibilities for a better mount, but the ones I've seen on Amazon all have reviews that talk about breaking and cheap construction.

    Can anyone recommend a good handlebar mount?

    On a related note, I've thought the video would be more interesting if the camera was lower, perhaps mounted on the head tube with some sort of strap on bracket. Has anyone seen such a thing, or would I have to make it myself?

    BB

    I use the chest mount and it works far better than the Gopro handlebar mount..
    Riding 19 Years of Specialized Sirrus Tradition.
    Live in Houston? Come to http://bicyclecommutehouston.blogspot.com/
    1988 Specialized Sirrus, 1989 Alpine Monitor Pass MTB, 2007 Specialized Sirrus 700C hybrid, 2007 Schwinn Town & Country trike, 1970 "Resto-Improved" Raleigh 20, 1970 "WIP" Raleigh 20, and 1980 "WIP" Schwinn Town & Country trike

  7. #32
    Senior Member Gus90's Avatar
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    Have you looked at these K-Edge mounts?

    K-EDGE GO BIG Mounts

  8. #33
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    The nice thing about a head tube mount is that it eliminates handlebar motion and improving stability. Even if you pedal smoothly the bars move back and forth slightly with each stroke, which becomes very noticeable if you speed up the video. I made this one a few years ago clamping a pole onto my head tube with the camera pointed backwards. That clamp only fit the head tube on one of my bikes though. I keep meaning to find another way to attach a camera to the head tube. Would be nice to have a couple threaded bosses there.


  9. #34
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    overbyte - nice pass
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

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