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Old 07-22-16, 07:41 AM   #1
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Dutch bike parts interchangeability

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Is there a good chance parts from different Dutch bike brand are interchanebility?

For example, if I take the rear wheel from a Delta Nostagia, will it bolt onto a Gazelle Tour Populair?
Both of these bikes look exactly the same from a distance.
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Old 07-22-16, 08:17 AM   #2
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Probably, I don't know Delta, but it looks like quite a cheap mark that just buys standard parts of the shelf, maybe the chain tensioners or the gazelle nuts won't fit, but that's not a real problem. Almost all important sizes have been standard, either it fits, or it's an entirely different size you will notice from 10 yards distance. Crankcases might be very different, and the way the handlebars are fitted into the headtube could be different. If the Gazelle is half a century old, there also might be some fitting issues, but then I wouldn't want to change parts anyway, because you would be exchanging very good parts for nothing special, to put it mildly.

If it's a young tour populair, the difference is much smaller. But still Gazelle has high end pretences and they still know how to make a wheel turn lightly and put it together well, so it would be downgrade. It's not an internal hub gear Gazelle I presume?
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Old 07-22-16, 08:22 AM   #3
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Yes, the Gazelle is modern, and has 3 speed with hand brake (drum).

I saw a Delta with coaster brake for sale, and I was wondering if I can put the Delta rear wheel on the Gazelle. Just for a little bit of nostalgia fun.
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Old 07-22-16, 09:39 AM   #4
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It's highely likely you can. But it would be fake nostalgia, not because Delta is probably not even Dutch, didn't manufacture in the Netherlands and doesn't meet nostalgic Dutch quality standards. But because there are traditional Dutch frames with coaster brake and with double drum brakes (rod or cable operated). The combinaton of coaster and front drum has never existed. The combination of a coaster and a handbrake has existed, but that was one of the dumbest designs ever, as the front handbrake was a rod operated brake that landed vertically on the tire itself.

The tour populair is about as nostalgic and traditional as it gets, it has been in continous production for almost 100 years, it has changed little, cable drum brakes are also used for 50 years. It isn't build to traditional quality standards either, and probably won't last a 100 years like the old ones and Gazelle is living of it's reputation a bit, but it's still a pretty good bike and better than less traditonal Gazelle models. Also if you take out the rear wheel with the 3 speed hub, the axl will probably need re-adjusting if you put it back in, it can be quite tricky to get that just right.
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Old 07-22-16, 09:45 AM   #5
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Why is Measuring things so difficult, for this forum?

how wide is the back of the frame , where the wheels go?
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Old 07-22-16, 09:51 AM   #6
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Why is Measuring things so difficult, for this forum?

how wide is the back of the frame , where the wheels go?
Haha...I don't have the bike.

To measure the frame, you have to remove the chain cover...which I haven't figure out how to do yet. It looks very complex. And I don't know to measure accurately the sprocket offset.

The seller will probably balk, if I take his bike apart to measure it.
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Old 07-22-16, 11:28 AM   #7
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Haha...I don't have the bike.

To measure the frame, you have to remove the chain cover...which I haven't figure out how to do yet. It looks very complex. And I don't know to measure accurately the sprocket offset.
That's another thing, if you do maintenance and repairs on a mtb or road bike, to be thorough you take it apart completely and put it back together. A Dutch bike you don't take apart unless you really need to, it's not really complicated, but putting it back together is full of fiddly jobs. And if you do it really well, it is very difficult to get it as tight as it was and to come close to that, you have to do the taking apart bit very carefully, not just the putting on. If it's not tight enough, it is going to wear out very fast. To oil the chain for example, you just open it a bit once every year (which is often), you don't take the whole cover off. Keeping the chain clean comes at a price.

I have a 10 year old tour populair with an aftermarket 3/4 chain case (I bought it used, probably the former owner made a mess of it and decided to replace it with something cheaper), it's a 28" oma, I can measure it for you if you decide to ignore my advice.

Here's a video of German who tells how easy it is, but by the looks of it, if he does it 3 more times like that he will need a new chain guard too.
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Old 07-22-16, 02:51 PM   #8
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Why is Measuring things so difficult, for this forum?
how wide is the back of the frame , where the wheels go?
I held up a ruler and eyeballed the frame width at the rear axle...and I think it's 120mm.
Based on my research, most traditional coaster hub for 635mm wheel has 110mm width.

Is it okay to flex the steel frame 10mm to fit the smaller hub size?

And what if the sprocket no longer lines up with the chain ring?

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That's another thing, if you do maintenance and repairs on a mtb or road bike, to be thorough you take it apart completely and put it back together. A Dutch bike you don't take apart unless you really need to, it's not really complicated, but putting it back together is full of fiddly jobs. And if you do it really well, it is very difficult to get it as tight as it was and to come close to that, you have to do the taking apart bit very carefully, not just the putting on. If it's not tight enough, it is going to wear out very fast. To oil the chain for example, you just open it a bit once every year (which is often), you don't take the whole cover off. Keeping the chain clean comes at a price.

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Old 07-23-16, 11:11 AM   #9
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Thought it was a fit problem with the saddle , last week

this sounds like you have one issue after another on this Bike.

Figure out what You want and go look for a new bike, that resolves all your dissatisfactions .
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Old 07-23-16, 11:27 AM   #10
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Thought it was a fit problem with the saddle , last week

this sounds like you have one issue after another on this Bike.

Figure out what You want and go look for a new bike, that resolves all your dissatisfactions .


Not really an issue...more like customizing.


Yeah...I could just buy a bike that has everything I want...but then I would be just like one of thousands of people who have that bike.

Part of being cool is customizing your own ride. Nobody has what you have. And satisfaction of owning something that is perfect for your exact taste and fit.

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Old 07-23-16, 11:43 AM   #11
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Contract a frameBuilder give him a list . hand over the bike .
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Old 07-23-16, 12:10 PM   #12
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It might interest you that there's a Dutch manufacturer these days who does all his bikes custom made, you can't choose anything you want because they have their own quality parts selected and refuse to use parts that might break. They have all kind of frames, some really eyecatching, and a lot of other parts to choose from, adding up to millions of different bikes that could be build. It is surprisingly inexpensive considering the durable quality and that it's made to your preferences, not cheap of course but nothing extreme for good quality commuter/utility bikes.

I really like them, I have rule that I don't buy new bikes because they are likely to get stolen and I shouldn't get too attached to one, but they tempt me.
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