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View Poll Results: Which country of the EU do your most often cycle within...
The U.K. 9 7.69%
Ireland 7 5.98%
Scandavia 13 11.11%
Denmark 3 2.56%
Germany 16 13.68%
France 11 9.40%
Italy 7 5.98%
Spain 3 2.56%
The Low Countries. 16 13.68%
Other 32 27.35%
Voters: 117. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-03-10, 12:29 PM   #26
Urthwhyte
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Stram F'en op! ("Danglish" for HTFU :wink: )

But the paths here, at least between my house and the university, are fine. I saw two sweepers on the way home last night, and one passed behind our house two or three times before I went off to bed.

Are you in CPH? DTU or KU?
If I could find my knobbies I'd have no qualms over riding in the snow, but with a 28mm slick even with lower tire pressure on my commuter, I'd rather not risk having to sit through class in wet pants if I were to wipe out while cornering. They finally got around to clearing the roads, although it took them until ~11:00, and even then traffic was fairly bad on Strandvejen for cars, only saw two or three cyclists on my walk home.

I am in CPH, albeit not in university quite yet, although I am looking at DTU once I graduate.
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Old 02-03-10, 01:18 PM   #27
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If I could find my knobbies I'd have no qualms over riding in the snow, but with a 28mm slick even with lower tire pressure on my commuter, I'd rather not risk having to sit through class in wet pants if I were to wipe out while cornering. They finally got around to clearing the roads, although it took them until ~11:00, and even then traffic was fairly bad on Strandvejen for cars, only saw two or three cyclists on my walk home.

I am in CPH, albeit not in university quite yet, although I am looking at DTU once I graduate.
Yeah, that's why I keep my bike with the 2x26's on it. Occassionally it comes in handy.
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Old 09-21-10, 01:29 PM   #28
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Ride most of the times in Switzerland, where I live. I also lived in the Netherlands, so I love the contrast between these two cycling "cultures": my personal opinion is that one is more around cycling for leisure and sports (quite popular though) while the other treats bicycles as a fundamental part of their daily lives. The latter (Holland) has much better cycle lanes and paths while scenery in Switzerland is quite breadth taking.
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Old 09-22-10, 04:51 AM   #29
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I live and work in Ireland but I tour mostly in France.

Urban cycling in Ireland is dangerous but if you have been doing it long enough like I have you develop a survival instinct. We do have cycle paths/lanes but many are poorly designed. Many motorists are inconsiderate of cyclists. I always wear a helmet cycling at home.

On the otherhand, when touring (mostly in France) I never feel the need to wear a helmet as motorists are invariably considerate and courteous towards cyclists. The food is better, the wine cheaper and the secondary roads quieter.
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Old 10-04-10, 02:40 AM   #30
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u ride in France- I can understand that...
. We just got back from a trip to Ireland. ( the west coast.. especially the Ring of Kerry.._) Saw a couple cyclists about.. Dam few.. Those narrow roads are terrible. And traffic Ridiculously fast for such curvy, narrow roads- hardly ever with shoulders....... The only bike friendly city we saw was Limerick... If I were to ride in the Ireland, I saw: I'd have to wear body armor and and put a jigger of Jamison in my water bottle, in order to calm me nerves.
Other than that, Ireland was great. I just not take my bike when visiting the Emerald Isle..
ps. You take the ferry to France..?. Do they charge an arm and a leg to put your bike on board.. Crossing by boat many times gets a bit pricey.?
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Old 10-04-10, 12:17 PM   #31
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We just got back from a cycling trip in France. Loved it! Most cities we've been to had bike lanes, I also noticed a lot of people riding the bike sharing bikes (Bixi here), even in smaller cities.

I found drivers a lot more comfortable around bikes, and a lot more patient and respectful than what I'm used to. And we were on some pretty busy roads, some with shoulders and some without. In almost three weeks of riding in cities and countryside, we only got honked at once. My theory is that it was a North American tourist. ;-) We had cars, buses and huge trucks patiently waiting for a good time to pass us, quite amazing.

Also, it's worth asking local cyclists about bike paths in the area. There were more of them around that I was able to find while planning our trip.

Can't wait to go back!
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Old 10-05-10, 02:58 PM   #32
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ps. You take the ferry to France..?. Do they charge an arm and a leg to put your bike on board.. Crossing by boat many times gets a bit pricey.?
No, I generally fly Aer Lingus. This summer I flew Dublin to Bordeaux and returned Lyon to Dublin. Bike was €40 each way. I never box bike flying Aer Lingus in Europe and bike always arrives in good shape. Flying works out cheaper especially in the summer.

I have taken ferry in past both to Cherbourg (Normandy)and to Roscoff (Brittany) and find it a bit of a pain getting to ferry port and then an overnight onboard. Current ferry prices for bikes are €10/€5 Irishferries/Brittanyferries eachway.

Wanna see my holiday pics?

http://cid-ee2d580a9b948dff.photos.l...%20July%202010

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Old 10-05-10, 03:16 PM   #33
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One location I'd like to cycle Caretaker is Scotland. Scenic, quite, I expect the roads are not heavily traveled.. . 40 euros is not a bad price , considering what many charge..
I've seen some wrap their bikes in plastic.. It's reasonably priced. Looks like it would offer some protection.. Wish I could say I've had the same luck on B/A.. Once they ruined about 6 spokes on my front wheel and bent my handlebar, even though I had it quite well protected within a bike box.
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Old 10-06-10, 04:32 AM   #34
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Wish I could say I've had the same luck on B/A.. Once they ruined about 6 spokes on my front wheel and bent my handlebar, even though I had it quite well protected within a bike box.
There you go. To box or not to box that is the question.

If you box the temptation for baggage handlers is to use this nice flat box as a platform to put heavy cases etc. on top of, whereas leaving your bike unboxed it probably has a better chance of ending up top of the pile. I may be proved wrong next time but it's a theory that's worked for me up till now.
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Old 10-22-10, 07:15 AM   #35
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I live near Bourg d'Oisans and cycle in the area most of the time... and I tend to cycle on some flatter areas near Grenoble.
If by any chance anyone needed any advise regarding the French Alps or l'Alpe d'Huez please feel free to ask ! Ced x
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Old 10-27-10, 01:30 AM   #36
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I live near Bourg d'Oisans and cycle in the area most of the time... and I tend to cycle on some flatter areas near Grenoble.
If by any chance anyone needed any advise regarding the French Alps or l'Alpe d'Huez please feel free to ask ! Ced x
I've always wanted to know if there is any way to get between Grenoble and Bourg d'Oisans, or further up the valley, by public transport with a bike. I live in Switzerland, so I can get to Grenoble by train quite easily, but getting around most of the rest of the French Alps without a car seems quite difficult.

Of course, I could ride my bike, but this is not so easy with a racing bike and luggage, or I sometimes want to skip the boring sections in the big valleys to save some time on shorter trips.
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Old 11-04-10, 03:44 AM   #37
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I do nearly all my regular cycling in Languedoc, France. The infrastructure is excellent, if what you mean by infrastructure are lots of small, quiet roads. If you mean cycling lanes and paths then, well, it's not Holland or Denmark, to put it mildly.

Riding in France is probably the best in Europe, but not because of cycling paths or greenways. It is because of the thousands of tiny roads that take you everywhere you want to go - and plus the incredible diversity in landscapes, climate and culture that exist here. But, I would love to see a few more places I can ride without ever having to worry about things with motors.

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Old 11-04-10, 12:06 PM   #38
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Agree Gerry , follow the D roads. They are almost always perfect for cycling.. Low traffic flows , small scenic villages. I"ll second Roussillon. Down here adjacent the Pyrenees we have a bike path for every mood. Here we can bike the hills adjacent the coast , mountain roads , or one area, it even sort of looks like America's wild west.
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Old 11-04-10, 12:30 PM   #39
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Agree Gerry , follow the D roads. They are almost always perfect for cycling.. Low traffic flows , small scenic villages. I"ll second Roussillon. Down here adjacent the Pyrenees we have a bike path for every mood. Here we can bike the hills adjacent the coast , mountain roads , or one area, it even sort of looks like America's wild west.
Not all D roads have been created equal. From my experience, they go from tiny roads through the vineyards (also canal du Midi had a D road marking) to quite busy highways. Still, even on those busy roads we got way more space and respect from drivers, than we would here at home.
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Old 11-18-10, 01:48 AM   #40
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Which country of the EU do your most often cycle within...
I cycle in the Netherlands, and while I accept the nickname 'Holland' some of the time, I do not want to vote for the 'country' "The Low Countries" as they do not exist.
It might have been right if it was asking for regions, but even then I would not have been sure whether to tick the thing or not.

A very disapointed Dutch cyclist.
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Old 11-18-10, 07:10 AM   #41
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I cycle in the Netherlands, and while I accept the nickname 'Holland' some of the time, I do not want to vote for the 'country' "The Low Countries" as they do not exist.
It might have been right if it was asking for regions, but even then I would not have been sure whether to tick the thing or not.


A very disapointed Dutch cyclist.
you'll get over it.
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Old 11-18-10, 01:08 PM   #42
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you'll get over it.
I have not gotten over it in 46 years.
It does not get less, it gets worse.
So I fight to get the name of my country known, and within reason I manage.
It is a long fight, but if all Dutch help, we will finally be known by our proper name.
In the end we might even get the whole world to recognize the name Nederland and the people as Nederlander.
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Old 11-18-10, 02:39 PM   #43
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I have not gotten over it in 46 years.
It does not get less, it gets worse.
So I fight to get the name of my country known, and within reason I manage.
It is a long fight, but if all Dutch help, we will finally be known by our proper name.
In the end we might even get the whole world to recognize the name Nederland and the people as Nederlander.
you really should find something relevant to worry about.

here's a suggestion -

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Old 11-27-10, 10:51 PM   #44
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Agree Gerry , follow the D roads. They are almost always perfect for cycling.. Low traffic flows , small scenic villages. I"ll second Roussillon. Down here adjacent the Pyrenees we have a bike path for every mood. Here we can bike the hills adjacent the coast , mountain roads , or one area, it even sort of looks like America's wild west.
The trouble in the South is the Mistral which can be tiring and goes on for ever--but the South does not remind me of the American West because after 5 or 10km you will be in a beautiful quaint little village! Some "D" (departementale) can be very busy unfortunately, but there is a subset of roads smaller than the departementale that are also incredibly enjoyable!
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Old 11-28-10, 12:55 PM   #45
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The trouble in the South is the Mistral which can be tiring and goes on for ever--but the South does not remind me of the American West because after 5 or 10km you will be in a beautiful quaint little village! Some "D" (departementale) can be very busy unfortunately, but there is a subset of roads smaller than the departementale that are also incredibly enjoyable!
In Roussillon , the winds are called the tremontes. I think they are slightly warmer and weaker than the mistral. Normally at least.. In the winter it's not so bad.. Bad weather ( freezing and sub zero cold) is rarely a problem.. But those Tremontes. Unless you are comfortable with 50 plus mph winds, those winds will cause you to usually loose about 6-8 days a month.. Out of 31, that's not too bad..
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Old 11-29-10, 03:43 AM   #46
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Not all D roads have been created equal. From my experience, they go from tiny roads through the vineyards (also canal du Midi had a D road marking) to quite busy highways. Still, even on those busy roads we got way more space and respect from drivers, than we would here at home.
You're right, Lucille. D roads can be very busy. The best thing I've found is to look for the 'white Ds' on the Michelin map. I've only ever been on a handful of white roads that I'd consider too busy to ride on and I've been cycling here for 2.5 years. The 'yellow Ds' are often much straighter, avoiding many of the smaller villages, and therefore busier and faster.
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Old 12-04-10, 02:00 AM   #47
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Well, since I live in Germany I ride in Germany. Duh?

I'm looking into some biking vacation tours next spring/summer in other countries.
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Old 12-04-10, 09:09 AM   #48
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You're right, Lucille. D roads can be very busy. The best thing I've found is to look for the 'white Ds' on the Michelin map. I've only ever been on a handful of white roads that I'd consider too busy to ride on and I've been cycling here for 2.5 years. The 'yellow Ds' are often much straighter, avoiding many of the smaller villages, and therefore busier and faster.
Thanks, I will be definitely looking for those next time. And while we never had any close calls, some of those roads were just too busy to enjoy the ride.
One thing I would suggest for everybody to have, is a reflective vest. We were given some on the Loire trail, and wore them every time we found ourselves on a busy road. We figured that the more visible we are, the better chance of survival we have. And you can't miss those highlighter yellow vests!
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Old 01-10-11, 03:32 AM   #49
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I've always wanted to know if there is any way to get between Grenoble and Bourg d'Oisans, or further up the valley, by public transport with a bike. I live in Switzerland, so I can get to Grenoble by train quite easily, but getting around most of the rest of the French Alps without a car seems quite difficult.

Of course, I could ride my bike, but this is not so easy with a racing bike and luggage, or I sometimes want to skip the boring sections in the big valleys to save some time on shorter trips.
Hello Chris, sorry it took so long to reply... To answer your question, there is only 1 direct road from Grenoble to Bourg d'Oisans I'm affraid, there are parts where you can take some back roads but not often... I personally live in St Colomban which is between St Jean de Maurienne and Bourg d'Oisans via the Col du Glandon/Croix de Fer. so I never cycle that busy road.
In this case, get a train to St Jean de Maurienne and cycle the Col du Glandon ! It will be much quieter but harder... I'll wait for you half way up with a beer if you like !!

To answer your other question, you can get to various place by train quite easily... From Annecy, Modane, Grenoble you can cycle straight from the train stations and hit the climbs quite fast. From Grenoble to Bourg d'Oisans, I am pretty sure there are buses, especially in the summer... I can find out for you if you like.
I am planning to bike ride from Evian to Nice next summer if this is of any interest to anyone ?

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Old 02-01-11, 11:25 AM   #50
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Those narrow roads are terrible. And traffic Ridiculously fast for such curvy, narrow roads- hardly ever with shoulders....... The only bike friendly city we saw was Limerick... If I were to ride in the Ireland, I saw: I'd have to wear body armor and and put a jigger of Jamison in my water bottle, in order to calm me nerves.
Its true and its such a shame as well, we've some spectacular scenery in Ireland, you're taking your life into your hands going down the boreens (little roads) with rustic boy racers belting along at a buck ten. The cities aren't much better, but of course there's been a rise in car ownership over the last ten years and the infrastructure just hasn't been upgraded.
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