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Thread: Cross Chain

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    Cross Chain

    My Domane has an Ultegra Compact double on front and 10 speed on the back. I was wondering while I am in the little ring on the front how far I can expect to down in gears on the back before getting the chain crossed. I thought I should be able to go half way down but, when I do that my front derailer starts to make noise.

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    not sure, mine is an ultegra 6800 version but I get no real noise from cross chaining...I do not think mid-range should be an issue

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    in the smallest ring in the front, you should be able to use pretty much all of them but the last, if it's set up right. Are you using the trim position to move the front derailleur over when you get midway down the cassette. If you cant, all that it probably needs is a lower limit adjustment + some sufficient cable tension.

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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Yup -- if the chain is rubbing on the front derailleur cage, you have a derailleur lateral positioning / "trim" problem.

    With a 2x10 I would expect every combination to work, except for large-large cross and possibly small-small cross.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    Old. Slow. Happy. MileHighMark's Avatar
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    If you can't go more than half-way across the cassette w/o it rubbing, it sounds like there's an adjustment issue. The last Shimano-equipped (10s) bike I had could use 8-9 of the cogs w/o rubbing.
    I like bikes. Oh, and doughnuts, too.

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    Thanks for the input. For some reason, I thought I had the half step trim on the big ring only now I know it is on big and small ring.

    Lol - I have been missing out on some gears I could have used a time or two

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    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
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    I think with modern compacts and derailleurs, you should be able to use virtually all the gear combinations. I seldom find myself using the small/small (34/12) combination, but commonly use the large/large (50/27) at least for brief periods - e.g., going up a significant but not outrageous hill in the big ring, and slowly moving up the cassette, if I find the 50/23, then 50/25 combinations too much, I'll just go for the 50/27 for a while. If it were a longer haul, I'd switch to the small ring.

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    afraid of whales Mr IGH's Avatar
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    Cross chaining, the biggest non-issue to seize up bikeforums. Cross-chain all you want/need, nobody has ever proved it has any bad effects. As for power loss, low angle offsets cost little, do the trigonometry if you don't understand....
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    I never give it any thought. If I can't shift, I know I'm in the wrong ring!

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    your god hates me Bob Ross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
    Cross chaining, the biggest non-issue to seize up bikeforums. Cross-chain all you want/need, nobody has ever proved it has any bad effects. As for power loss, low angle offsets cost little, do the trigonometry if you don't understand....
    I think most of the "Cross-Chaining Is Bad!" aphorisms are holdovers from the days of 5- and 6-cog clusters; I agree that a modern (10- or 11-speed) drivetrain with compact 50/34 chainrings is pretty much immune from any possible equipment damage or performance degradations when cross-chained

    ...but that doesn't necessarily mean that "Cross-Chaining Is Good". The biggest problem I see with people who habitually cross-chain is that they essentially back themselves into a corner gear-wise: They run out of cogs before the terrain they're on runs out of challenges, and then they're forced to do an inopportune front shift, usually with disasterous results (huge change in cadence, or dropped chains). If they'd been more aware of what gear they were in and better anticipated how to maximize their efficiency on the terrain, they would've done some preemptive shifting earlier to prevent ever being in that dramatically cross-chained condition.
    Last edited by Bob Ross; 04-16-15 at 09:41 AM.

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    afraid of whales Mr IGH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    ...but that doesn't necessarily mean that "Cross-Chaining Is Good"....
    Most riders have indicators on their brake levers/shifters and always know what gear they're in. As stated above by others, the usual case to be cross-chained is in the big front ring because the ride is cresting a small hill/rise and needs it for a short burst. If someone is dropping a chain whilst shifting, the issue is mechanical and has nothing to do with poor bikesmanship.
    IGH's, Dyno Hubs, LED lights and old frames

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    your god hates me Bob Ross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
    Most riders have indicators on their brake levers/shifters and always know what gear they're in.

    I just laughed so hard I passed coffee through my nose!

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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
    Cross chaining, the biggest non-issue to seize up bikeforums. Cross-chain all you want/need, nobody has ever proved it has any bad effects. As for power loss, low angle offsets cost little, do the trigonometry if you don't understand....
    Today's ultraflexible chains help alot, but cross chaining still does accelerate chainring wear. I run 2x6 with SRAM PC-58 chains on all of my road bikes, and I use 11 of the 12 gears -- everything but large-large, which tends to run noticeably roughly, even though my chains are not overly taut.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    I just laughed so hard I passed coffee through my nose!
    I hate it when that happens to me.

    Agree -- I know what gear I am in solely from the positions of the shift levers, since my road bikes are all friction shift and I run my mountain bike in friction mode, which allowed me to upgrade from a 7-speed freewheel to an 8-speed cassette simply by swaping the rear wheel and tweaking the limit screws on the derailleur.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
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    USMC Veteran qcpmsame's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    I just laughed so hard I passed coffee through my nose!
    Same here, must be riding a hybrid with flat bars to have a gear indicator on a brake or shift lever. Didn't Shimano try, and fail, at having indicators on the Flight Deck stuff, a few years back? And, poor bike skills can certainly cause a dropped chain, pushing for another shift really hard can do the trick, on some brifter or double tap systems.

    Bill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
    Most riders have indicators on their brake levers/shifters and always know what gear they're in. As stated above by others, the usual case to be cross-chained is in the big front ring because the ride is cresting a small hill/rise and needs it for a short burst. If someone is dropping a chain whilst shifting, the issue is mechanical and has nothing to do with poor bikesmanship.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    I just laughed so hard I passed coffee through my nose!
    I wasn't drinking coffee, but I agree!

    J.

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