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  1. #1
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    Turned 60 and need help picking new wheels

    I grew up in Chicago and practically lived on a bike as a kid. A three-speed Schwinn Corvette. As a grown-up, I continued to ride fairly regularly, using a Gitane and a Trek. For the past 15-20 years I've been riding a chrome-moly Schwinn Voyageur 11.9 with upgraded cranks, brakes, etc. Which I loved. However...

    I hate to admit it, but, dang, I'm getting old. That old Avocet saddle that I loved for years isn't comfortable the way it once was. And bending over the drops has become too much for my back. Yeah, and my weight too.

    Anyhow, rather than give up on biking, I'm looking for good advice on how to choose a "seniors" bike - but I'm not ready for big balloon tires and a "paper route" bike either. Hybrids look like they might be where I need to go. Honestly, I'm not going to be doing mountain trails. More likely are comfort rides of 15-20 miles or less on roads or bike trails. Some grades, but nothing that will put me into heart failure :-)

    I want to sit up, I guess - and avoid a sore butt at the end of the day. Enough gears to spread across road demands. Capacity to mount some medium size panniers if I decided to work up to something longer. But mostly I want something that can grow old(er) with me and be comfortable, yet allow as much work out as I'm in the mood for on any given day. It can be a new bike - or I'm willing to look around for the right used one. I bought the Voyageur used - it was in mint condition and I got an incredible deal way back then for $250. I know we're talking a fair bit more now for a chrome-moly frame...!!!

    I look forward to any and all advice. I'm just starting to research now, with a motive of providing my family some options for Father's Day!

    Thanks!
    Dr. Gary Axelson
    Oakton, Virginia

  2. #2
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    You briefly mentioned your weight. Would dropping a couple pounds help you to feel more comfortable on the bike you have? After all, you're only 60--kinda young to start giving up things you love!

  3. #3
    Banned wagathon's Avatar
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    CrMo isn't that expensive anymore. Bianchi is a big name that you probably remember from way back, but their steel frames are now made in Taiwan since at least '02.

    I checked out Bianchi's site for an example and only one of their "cross-terrain" bikes even had drop bars so that seemed like the only one you'd be interested in. It looks pretty good: the Castro Valley. It is only $800, comes with fenders and rack mounts and "big" 28 mm tires.

    I wouldn't get it though. Just 9 gears and not that low either (lowest, a 42-26 option? Not much of a hill-climbing gear there).

    You definitely better pick out exactly what you think you want. There's so many options out there, I can't imagine trusting to the family's choice about what you may be looking for.

    I would suggest that you make them spend a bundle and check out the Trek Pilot with a carbon fiber (not aluminum) frame (e.g., tell'm you want something made in the good ole U.S.A. like your old Schwinn. How can they turn you down?), except that, I don't see putting a rack and panniers on a Pilot's carbon fiber frame, i.e., it is supposed to be a performance "comfort" bike, not a tour bike. But, reading about it might help you refine what you want.

  4. #4
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
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    You might check out the listing of bikes at this thread. They are bikes ridden by 50+rs


    I hate to admit it, but, dang, I'm getting old.
    Really? It is all in the mind. You are as old as you think you are, IMHO.

    I'm 65, and not at all anxious to give up the road bikes. However, I have made some adjustments for my "classic" style body.

    I might suggest you see a good local bike shop for a "fitting." I did, and we made some changes that made things more comfortable.

    I would sure miss the nimbleness and responsiveness of my road bikes.

    You might also consider a recumbent.
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 04-26-05 at 06:27 AM.
    Gone - email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for new group of old 50+ folks

  5. #5
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    I hate to admit it, but, dang, I'm getting old.
    You are? I'm 60 and I'm not old.


    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    ...bending over the drops has become too much for my back. Yeah, and my weight too.
    Drop the extra weight and you may be able to bend over comfortably.


    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    I'm looking for good advice on how to choose a "seniors" bike...
    Not sure what a "seniors" bike is, but you can see my bikes below.
    My bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---
    2013 Cannondale CAAD 10 2 "Racing Edition"--The bike shop owner said it's toast after the car-bike accident. R.I.P.
    * * 2014 or 2015 CAAD 10 3 coming soon. Decision time. * *

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  6. #6
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    I'm almost 60 as well. I also have a few extra pounds, but I love my new Lemond with carbon/steel frame, Campy Chorus grouppo.

  7. #7
    Senior Member izgod's Avatar
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    Test ride a recumbent bike. Compact long wheel base is good to start. Cannondale makes one that is supremely comfortable and will definitely get you where you want to go. It also will get you a lot of attention. I started riding bents a few years back when I got some spinal neck problems. No more pain, anywhere, ever. I can stay out longer and go farther than I ever could before. So I've really gotten better as I've gotten older.

  8. #8
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    I just turned 60, too, and here are a few things I've found that really helped:
    I was pretty proud of myself for having gained "only" 2 or 3 pounds a year, until I realized I'd been doing it since the Reagan administration. That amounted to almost 40 pounds. Last summer I lost 35 of them, and I felt MUCH better--I could ride longer, I was more comfortable and I could even use the drops. Significantly, I gained about 20 back over the winter, and I can really feel the difference. I'm back on the diet-and-exercise plan now.
    Raising your handlebars to about level with the saddle makes a big difference. You may need a new stem, but it's well worth it. I built up my Atlantis that way on Rivendell's recommendation, and it was so dramatic a difference that I did the same thing to my other road bikes (a beater with fenders and an old Trek converted to singlespeed). More on this at www.rivbike.com, if you want to see some reasons.
    If you're using boy-racer 23mm tires, consider swapping to much larger ones. Somebody recommended 28s, which is a start, but I do nearly all my riding on 32s or 35s these days. You can run the 32s at 100-105 psi, and they're no slower, for me, than skinnier tires. My Panaracer Pasela 35s go to 75-80 psi, and they're really cushy but still roll fine. I weigh about 230, and 23 or 25mm tires just don't make any sense for anybody over 175 or so. I've timed myself on my 22-mile commute on different tires, and there's not a measureable difference--how I feel on a given day is a much better predictor of time than the tire size is.
    Check your bike before you go too big, to make sure there's room between the fork blades and under the brakes. Some bikes won't take tires much larger than 25mm.

  9. #9
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Velo gives good advice. I'm riding on 28m tires and they flex too much for me. Next set I'm going to get ones that will take more than 60psi. I had them overinflated at 90psi and ride was great.

    I'm not sure brand makes too much difference. It's all in what assembled together. Key considerations if I was getting a new bike would be:

    1. 9 speed, or 10 speed triple
    2. smoothest transitions between gears. Many manufacturers will put together sets where you jump more than 12% in changing from one gear to next. If not touring, something like a standard 30-42-5[2|3] with 23-27 9 speed cassette would be nice. If going to tour, consider a lower front end with something like 24-38-48 front. Find out what gear inches you need. Get your needed range from the gears you use now: what's the lowest you use, and what's the highest combo you use? Plan ahead for aging and go a bit lower on the low end.
    3. Use at least 105 quality components
    4. have a local shop configure so the bars are high: you can ride on the levers and on the bars so you'd have 2 positions and not have to face the drops. I agree with you, I can't handle the drops, but I didn't want the heavy tires of a hybrid.

    An excellent used bike would be the Giant Touring. It will take the wider tires and as much touring gear as you desire. Weren't that many sold so Giant has discontinued the line. Google "giant OCR touring". Last fall they were about $1150 and now 2004's run about $999. They have the component strength of a hybrid but use road tires for easier riding.
    Trek, Cannondale and a few others make good bikes like this.

    Good luck and have fun. Don't forget you can always suggest a gift certificate at your favorite bike shop.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  10. #10
    Senior Member skydive69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    I grew up in Chicago and practically lived on a bike as a kid. A three-speed Schwinn Corvette. As a grown-up, I continued to ride fairly regularly, using a Gitane and a Trek. For the past 15-20 years I've been riding a chrome-moly Schwinn Voyageur 11.9 with upgraded cranks, brakes, etc. Which I loved. However...

    I hate to admit it, but, dang, I'm getting old. That old Avocet saddle that I loved for years isn't comfortable the way it once was. And bending over the drops has become too much for my back. Yeah, and my weight too.

    Anyhow, rather than give up on biking, I'm looking for good advice on how to choose a "seniors" bike - but I'm not ready for big balloon tires and a "paper route" bike either. Hybrids look like they might be where I need to go. Honestly, I'm not going to be doing mountain trails. More likely are comfort rides of 15-20 miles or less on roads or bike trails. Some grades, but nothing that will put me into heart failure :-)

    I want to sit up, I guess - and avoid a sore butt at the end of the day. Enough gears to spread across road demands. Capacity to mount some medium size panniers if I decided to work up to something longer. But mostly I want something that can grow old(er) with me and be comfortable, yet allow as much work out as I'm in the mood for on any given day. It can be a new bike - or I'm willing to look around for the right used one. I bought the Voyageur used - it was in mint condition and I got an incredible deal way back then for $250. I know we're talking a fair bit more now for a chrome-moly frame...!!!

    I look forward to any and all advice. I'm just starting to research now, with a motive of providing my family some options for Father's Day!

    Thanks!
    Dr. Gary Axelson
    Oakton, Virginia
    A great bike, and worth a test ride, that meets your stated needs is the Specialized Sequoia. It has a relaxed, incredibly comfortable geometry without sacrificing performance - I have hit 37.2 mph on the flats with mine (slight tail wind). The stem is fully adjustable obviating the need for changing stems as flexibility/needs change. It has a triple chainring. Try it - you'll love it!

    I guess I am going the opposite from you. I just turned 65 this month, and just went incredibly aggressive with a dedicated racing bike - see attached.
    www.brokennecktobrokenrecords.com

  11. #11
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    Boy I'm glad I stumbled across this site. What a great bunch of welcoming, friendly folks! I really appreciate all of the useful input about possibilities, including the advice about dropping a few pounds (at 5'9" and 200 lbs, it's a matter of doc cure yourself!!) and the encouragement. Inside, I still feel about 42 - it's the external frame that sometimes argues with me to the contrary! You've all given me new enthusiasm about getting serious and resuming a more active commitment to a long time love. Of course if I buy some of the hardware some of you are recommending - and maybe more than one - my spouse is going to come after your kneecaps. After she gets mine. :-) May be 60, but Lord I still love my toys! See you all soon.
    Gar

  12. #12
    Senior Member Dchiefransom's Avatar
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    One of the guys in my club rides a Trek 5200, full Postal paint job. It left the bike shop brand new, with an MTB handlebar and shifters. Being "over 60", many of us have learned that sometimes "conventional" doesn't work, and being "old" means people don't expect us to be.

  13. #13
    Senior Member bernmart's Avatar
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    I second Skydive's recommendation re the Specialized Sequoia. I just bought the "Elite" version of the Sequoia, and at 66 I'm utterly comfortable on it. And is it fast! Way faster than my old Trek 520 touring bike.

    Isn't this a great forum, though?

    And you're not old!!!

  14. #14
    Just Senior cgod's Avatar
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    I just turned 55 and I'm not about to give up the aggressive riding position I've long enjoyed. If anything, I'm working to get even lower and more stretched-out. Got to keep the gut from getting in the way of the thighs, and work on lower back flexibility (along with everything else), and keep the abs reasonably strong.

    Last year I began to move more toward the larger diameter tires and more upright position, but as I got more fit the bike felt more and more like a boat anchor compared to my racing setup. Now I've got a newer, lighter, 10-speed setup (a Felt F55), self-built climbing wheels, and I'm really enjoying it. Yeah, that's more like it!

    Then, we've got nothing but hills where I live - SF Bay Area - East Bay. I really see no options for it but to gear way down and creep up the grades, or go all-out and attack them. Only the latter is any fun, as far as I'm concerned!

    Cam

  15. #15
    Papa Wheelie Sigurdd50's Avatar
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    Something like this might be a good compromise:

    http://feltracing.com/2005_bikes/2005_sr81.html

    Felt makes great bikes
    There are three models in this style. They seem to offer some aggressive components with an upright, hybrid/comfort position.

  16. #16
    Senior Curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    ...but I'm not ready for big balloon tires and a "paper route" bike either. Hybrids look like they might be where I need to go..
    I know I'll get flamed for even suggesting it, Dr. Gary, but at least look at the Electra Townie. If you fit it with 1.25" high-pressure tires, it is comfortable and fun.

  17. #17
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    I know I'll get flamed for even suggesting it, Dr. Gary, but at least look at the Electra Townie. If you fit it with 1.25" high-pressure tires, it is comfortable and fun.
    Electra Townie??? I think this thread should be moved to the Recreational & Family forum.
    My bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---
    2013 Cannondale CAAD 10 2 "Racing Edition"--The bike shop owner said it's toast after the car-bike accident. R.I.P.
    * * 2014 or 2015 CAAD 10 3 coming soon. Decision time. * *

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  18. #18
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    I don't know guys. Lots of good choices, but I almost didn't make it alive out of the Felt website. After checking out some of the babes they have modeling their bicycles, my blood pressure shot up a couple of dozen points. On the other hand, I felt like 21 again :-)

    If the blonde comes with the bike, I'm buying.

    Was looking online at some interesting looking bikes made by Marin. Anybody have any experience with them?

  19. #19
    Ridin' a Long Time.
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    I'm looking too. I'm 61, female and have laid off quite some time. I'm thinking about a Terry. Does anyone have any experience with that model?

  20. #20
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    The Schwinn Voyaguer was,and still is,one of the best bikes Schwinn sold. That said, unless you
    really want a different bike change to Voyager to "fit" you now. Change the bars, seat,etc. until
    you get the comfort you once enjoyed on that great frame. I know when my older schwinn became
    uncomfortable that's the route I took and it still one sweet ride now.

  21. #21
    Ridin' a Long Time.
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    I took my Raleigh CitySport (1987) in to the LBS today for a tuneup. I'm also getting a new seat designed for women --- with the cutout. The bike has always been quite comfortable for my purposes so I'm going to see if it will get me through a bit longer. In the meantime, I'm going to continue looking.

  22. #22
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    I did an organised road ride this week and I did it on the Tandem, Offroad Tandem of course and all we did was change the tyres. We are an accomplished team, and we work. We were definitely the fastest bike out there on the ride, even if we did not have the ideal bike for the ride, but were probably the fittest two out there. On the flat we were averaging 27mph. which is about right for us. Now on the ride there were 3 hybrids. All the same manufacture and model, but completely different grades of rider. This Hybrid is a Specialised Cirrus. All 3 riders had bought their bikes independantly of each other, and there was another Specialised that appeared the same but with Drop handlebars. At one point we got a chain working of the 5 bikes-3 hybrids, one road bike and the tandem. It was unbelievable. Top speed of 33 mph and a higher average for about 5 miles.
    None of the owners had a bad word about the Cirrus model, Effort involved at all stages of the ride were well within their fitness levels, and they finished the ride in pretty good shape. All of them had Graduated to this top end Hybrid bike from full race bikes but realised that the body cannot cope with a full Race model any longer. Not MY recommendation from riding, but if that Model of Hybrid can stay with the Tandem, and match it for speed, then this is one bike that any speed/comfort freaks should be looking at.

  23. #23
    'Bent Brian
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    As was posted earlier don't rule out a good recumbent. These bikes can be fast, fun, and are very comfortable. I went 'bent last spring and I seriously wonder why I didn't do it much sooner.

  24. #24
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    I purchased a Trek 520 in 2003 and I found it to be an excellent bike to ride. I will soon be 56 however and found that the saddle was too high in comparison with the handlebar. I had a riser stem installed and that helped considerably. As has been frequently commented on in this forum, the gearing is not recommended for loaded touring. If you credit card tour, I would say it would be fine. I decided to purchase another bike and get a similar one for my wife. We ordered custom made bikes, the specifications of which follow. As we wanted to ride in a more upright position, we had the head tubes extended by a few inches. In addition, the bike shop installed riser stems. While I find this set-up a little high for my liking, I could always replace the stems. All in all the bike is very comfortable. I was planning to get STI, but this would have required travel agents to be installed. Again, I was swayed by the arguments found in the various fora that I have read and opted for bar end shifters and a brake system not using travel agents. STI could always be installed later. For me at least, the Brooks B-17 is extremely comfortable.


    FRAMESET:
    FRAME: Columbus Zona Cro-Moly steel tubes and fork by Marinoni (Montreal).

    WHEELS:Mavic A719 (36); Shimano Deore XT hubs; 14G stainless spokes
    TIRES: Continental Top Touring 2000, 700x37c

    COMPONENTS:
    SADDLE: Brooks B-17
    SEATPOST: Kalloy SP 248F Black Aluminum
    HANDLEBARS: 3T THE 46 cm
    STEM: Pazzaz atb 895, 1, 9 cm
    HEADSET: Orbit X, non integrated

    DRIVETRAIN:
    SHIFTERS: Shimano Dura-Ace, bar end control
    FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano 105
    REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano XT Long
    CRANKSET: Shimano XT
    CASSETTE: XT 9 speed, 11x34
    Chainrings: 22,32,44 175 mm

    OTHER:
    BRAKESET: Avid 5 Single Digit 5
    PEDALS: Shimano PD-540, clipless
    Brake Handle: Dia-Compe
    Bar Tape: Bike Rib gel pad .
    Mud Guards Mirry Mirror clamped to handlebar
    Kick Stand
    3rd Bottle Holder

    EXTRAS: Rear Rack Stainless Steel - Interloc Racing Designs (IRD) Khyber
    Front Rack Jandd Expedition - Arkel Panniers and handlebar bag
    Cat Eye 8 - Topeak Road Morph pump - bell

  25. #25
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    I want to sit up, I guess
    Why? Road bikes are VERY comfortable if they FIT.


    Quote Originally Posted by gaxelson
    Enough gears to spread across road demands. Capacity to mount some medium size panniers if I decided to work up to something longer. But mostly I want something that can grow old(er) with me and be comfortable, yet allow as much work out as I'm in the mood for on any given day.
    Look at the pictures of my bikes below. I got the Jamis last December for my 60th bday.
    My bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---
    2013 Cannondale CAAD 10 2 "Racing Edition"--The bike shop owner said it's toast after the car-bike accident. R.I.P.
    * * 2014 or 2015 CAAD 10 3 coming soon. Decision time. * *

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

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