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  1. #1
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Gearing Up The Trek For Winter

    Tonight I picked up a Zephal LED headlight/taillight combo for the ridiculous price of 25.00 at Walmart. Headlight packs a good 180 lumens of see-me. The tailight is brighter than the blinkie I have used the past 4 summers. This bike is my commuter to work which is a whopping 250 yards to the shop door. It's a shame to drive so it's the MTB (will not ride my vintage babes) or walk when it bottoms out at subzero. Hopefully it will be that breakout winter of no more Arctic Vortexes (sp).

    Question: how many snow riders do we have that use studded tires on a MTB for streets and sidewalks? Which ones do you recommend and is this an overall enjoyable experience?
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jim from Boston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
    ...Question: how many snow riders do we have that use studded tires on a MTB for streets and sidewalks? Which ones do you recommend and is this an overall enjoyable experience?
    IME, and from reading BF threads, Schwalbe Marathon Winters are the best, for up to about three inches of new-fallen snow. My urban routes are usually plowed, with hardpack snow, and they are reliable for black ice. I don’t feel any significant increased rolling resistance, as described for more “aggressive" treads.

    I keep them on all winter, as I have for about six years, though most of my riding is on pavement, with no appreciable loss of studs.
    Last edited by Jim from Boston; 10-30-15 at 09:08 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
    IME, and from reading BF threads, Schwalbe Marathon Winters are the best, for up to about three inches of new-fallen snow. My urban routes are usually plowed, with hardpack snow, and they are reliable for black ice. I don’t feel any significant increased rolling resistance, as described for more “aggressive: treads.

    I keep them on all winter, as I have for about six years, though most of my riding is on pavement, with no appreciable loss of studs.
    Excellent. I will look them up.
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Schwalbe marathon winters are good tires; I use them. I mainly ride my bridgestone BB1 in the winter. This is the build thread on the bike, Heinz 57 Winter Commuter Build

    Winter commuting is fun.

  5. #5
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    Schwalbe marathon winters are good tires; I use them. I mainly ride my bridgestone BB1 in the winter. This is the build thread on the bike, Heinz 57 Winter Commuter Build

    Winter commuting is fun.
    Cool bike! What is the coldest temp you will ride in?
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

  6. #6
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    I commuted every day last winter. With the right clothes you can ride in any weather.

  7. #7
    Senior Member eatontkd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    I commuted every day last winter. With the right clothes you can ride in any weather.
    So, a beginners question; do you use clips/cleats with winter riding or just "bare" pedals? I feel like I'd want to be able to dismount faster in slid potential...
    Surround yourself with people who make you hungry for life, touch your heart, and nourish your soul...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jim from Boston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatontkd View Post
    So, a beginners question; do you use clips/cleats with winter riding or just "bare" pedals? I feel like I'd want to be able to dismount faster in slid potential...
    I ride clipless on my road bike, but on my winter bike I use toe cages without straps.

    Pannier.jpg

  9. #9
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatontkd View Post
    So, a beginners question; do you use clips/cleats with winter riding or just "bare" pedals? I feel like I'd want to be able to dismount faster in slid potential...
    I use platform pedals; bmx pedals work well with metal studs. I like MKS lambda pedals as well.

    The great thing about platform pedals is that you can use any shoes that you want. You can use your hiking shoes, your boots, whatever. In cold weather, that's a big plus in my book.

  10. #10
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    I'm just using the standard pedal that came with the 2002 Trek 820.

    Here is an internet pic of the same...
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

  11. #11
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    I use platform pedals; bmx pedals work well with metal studs. I like MKS lambda pedals as well.

    The great thing about platform pedals is that you can use any shoes that you want. You can use your hiking shoes, your boots, whatever. In cold weather, that's a big plus in my book.
    My commute is a 45sec ride down a hill at 8am, a ride back up the hill for lunch and repeat for afternoon/5pm. If it becomes too treacherous I can always ride the sidewalk or walk. I am totally blessed to work so near to my home.
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

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